Scientists Find Fluoride Causes Hypothyroidism Leading To Depression, Weight Gain, and Worse


The tables are finally starting to turn in regard to the perception that the world has of water fluoridation following the release of at least two reputable studies over the past three years documenting the adverse health effects caused by the chemical.

Researchers from the University of Kent, a public research university based in the United Kingdom, conducted the latest and considerably groundbreaking study on the health effects potentially caused by adding fluoride to the public’s water.

After studying data obtained from nearly every medical practice in England, scientists found that fluoride may be increasing the risk for hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce enough hormones, resulting in symptoms such as fatigue, obesity and depression.

Published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the study included the largest population ever analyzed in relation to the adverse health effects caused by water fluoridation.

Recent UK study includes the “largest population ever studied in regard to adverse effects of elevated fluoride exposure”

After collecting data from 99 percent of England’s 8,020 general medical practices, researchers found that the locations with fluoridated water were 30 percent more likely to have high levels of hypothyroidism, compared to areas with low, natural levels of the chemical in the water.

This means that up to 15,000 people could be suffering from depression, weight gain, fatigue and aching muscles, all of which could theoretically be prevented if fluoride were removed from the water, according to The Telegraph.

“Overall, there were 9 percent more cases of underactive thyroid in fluoridated places,” reports Newsweek, which also notes that 10 percent of England’s water is fluoridated compared with nearly 70 percent of America’s.

The science paper also compared the fluoridated city of Birmingham with the city of Manchester, which refrains from fluoridating, and found that doctor’s offices in Birmingham were nearly twice as likely to report high levels of hypothyroidism.

The new report has some experts questioning their stance on water fluoridation.

“The study is an important one because it is large enough to detect differences of potential significance to the health of the population,” said Trevor Sheldon, a medical researcher and dean of the Hill York Medical School who has published numerous studies in this field.

Sheldon, who in the past supported fluoride, admits that the “case for general water fluoridation” is no longer clear.

New fluoride study contradicts last year’s report by Public Health England that states fluoride is “safe and effective” for improving dental health

Released in March of last year, Public Health England’s report states that “there is no evidence of harm to health in fluoridated areas,” and no differences were found between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas in regard to rates of hip fractures, osteosarcoma (a form of bone cancer), cancers overall, Down’s syndrome births and all other recorded causes of death.

New research, however, suggests that the spike in the number of cases of hypothyroidism in areas such as the West Midlands and the North East of England is “concerning for people living in those areas.”

“The difference between the West Midlands, which fluoridates, and Manchester, which doesn’t was particularly striking. There were nearly double the number of cases in Manchester,” said the study’s lead author Stephen Peckham.

Women 15 times more likely to develop underactive thyroid

“Underactive thyroid is a particularly nasty thing to have and it can lead to other long term health problems. I do think councils need to think again about putting fluoride in the water. There are far safer ways to improve dental health.”

Hypothyroidism is particularly a cause for concern for women, as they’re 15 times more likely than men to develop the condition. Previous studies suggest that fluoride inhibits the thyroid’s ability to use iodine, which is an essential mineral for a healthy thyroid, the master gland in the human body.

 

Sources:
http://www.newsweek.com
http://jech.bmj.com
http://www.telegraph.co.uk
https://www.gov.uk

Obesity, Weight Gain Linked to Fibrosis Progression in NAFLD


Obesity and weight gain are independently associated with an increased risk for fibrosis progression in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a large cohort study has found. Weight loss was negatively associated with fibrosis progression.

“This association remained significant after adjustment for confounders including baseline BMI [body mass index], indicating that weight change per se is an independent risk factor for fibrosis progression. Higher BMI at baseline was also positively associated with APRI [aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index] progression,” the researchers write.

The study, by Yejin Kim, MHS, Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, and colleagues, was published online July 15 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

The researchers analyzed data from 40,700 adults who received comprehensive annual or biennial examinations as part of the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study. They included participants with fatty liver, as evidenced on abdominal ultrasonography, who had undergone a health examination between 2002 and 2016 and who had had two or more follow-up visits through the end of 2016. Patients were followed for a median of 6 years.

The authors explain that they used APRI score to assess fibrosis progression because it is noninvasive and the formula includes neither BMI nor age. The study’s primary endpoint was the development of intermediate to high probability of advanced fibrosis, as assessed by APRI.

The researchers first adjusted for age and sex, and later adjusted for center, year of screening examination, smoking status, alcohol consumption, regular exercise, education level, BMI, diabetes history, cardiovascular disease history, and hypertension history. A second model also adjusted for homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP).

There were 275,421.5 person-years of follow-up, during which 5454 patients with low APRI progressed to intermediate or high APRI.

When stratified into quintiles by weight change, those with the greatest weight loss (-43.4 to -2.3 kg) had a significantly reduced risk for progression (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62 – 0.74), compared with those whose weight was stable. Similarly, patients with small degrees of weight loss (-2.2 to -0.6 kg) had a reduced risk for progression (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78 – 0.94).

By contrast, any weight gain appeared to increase progression risk. Specifically, those who gained a smaller amount of weight (0.7 to 2.1 kg) showed a 17% risk increase (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 – 1.28), and those who gained more (2.2 to 26.5 kg) had a 71% increased risk (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.58 – 1.85).

These associations were not mediated by inflammation or insulin resistance after adjustment for HOMA-IR and hsCRP.

Compared with those whose baseline BMI was from 18.5 to 22.9 kg/m2, the HRs for APRI progression were as follows: 1.67 (95% CI, 0.74 – 3.73) for BMI of <18.5 kg/m2; 1.13 (95% CI, 1.02 – 1.26) for BMI of 23 – 24.9 kg/m2; 1.41 (95% CI, 1.28 – 1.55) for BMI of 25 – 29.9 kg/m2; and 2.09 (95% CI, 1.86 – 2.36) for BMI of ≥ 30. All values were determined after adjusting for age, sex, health center, year of screening examination, smoking status, alcohol consumption, exercise, education, diabetes history, cardiovascular disease history, and hypertension history. These associations remained significant after adjustments for HOMA-IR and hsCRP.

“When the impact of weight change on APRI worsening was compared with that of other metabolic factors, increasing quintiles of weight change, triglyceride, uric acid, and HOMA-IR and decreasing quintiles of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with increased risk of APRI worsening in a dose-response manner (all P for trend <.001), with weight change showing the greatest magnitude of association among the metabolic factors evaluated,” the authors explain.

The associations of both weight change and BMI with APRI progression were still seen in patients with NAFLD who had no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

“Although the mechanisms underlying the association between excessive adiposity or fat gain and the fibrosis progression are not yet fully understood, insulin resistance and inflammation are thought to be involved,” the researchers write. “However, after adjustment for HOMA-IR and hsCRP, the association between obesity, weight gain, and fibrosis progression remained significant. Multiple other factors, including oxidative stress and lipotoxicity, have also been implicated in fibrosis progression.”

Study limitations include the use of ultrasonography to diagnose NAFLD. Although liver biopsy is considered the gold standard, it is not be feasible in a large, low-risk population, and abdominal ultrasound is acceptable, the authors say. Also, although APRI “has demonstrated a reasonable utility as a noninvasive method for the prediction of histologically confirmed advanced fibrosis…there are no currently available longitudinal data to support the use of worsening noninvasive fibrosis markers as an indicator of histologic progression of fibrosis stage over time.”

The study was conducted among fairly healthy young and middle-aged Koreans and may not be generalizable to those of other ages, or to groups in which comorbidities are more prevalent, or to other racial or ethnic groups.

“In this large cohort study of young and middle-aged adults with NAFLD, obesity and weight gain were significantly and independently associated with an increased risk of developing fibrosis progression. Strategies for maintaining a healthy weight and preventing weight gain may help reduce fibrosis progression and its associated consequences in individuals with NAFLD,” the researchers conclude.

The noodles that are linked to chronic inflammation, weight gain, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s


ramen noodles

Instant noodles are a popular go-to lunch or dinner for those who are strapped for time (or cash), like college students. While you probably don’t consider them a health food, you may think they’re not that bad, or, at least, not as bad as eating a burger and fries or a fast-food burrito.

In a first-of-its-kind experiment, however, Dr. Braden Kuo of Massachusetts General Hospital may make you reconsider your love of instant noodles (assuming you have one).

He used a pill-sized camera to see what happens inside your stomach and digestive tract after you eat ramen noodles, one common type of instant noodles. The results were astonishing…

Video URL:https://youtu.be/IQlNv2Au-Lg

Ramen Noodles Don’t Break Down After Hours of Digestion

In the video above, you can see ramen noodles inside a stomach. Even after two hours, they are remarkably intact, much more so than the homemade ramen noodles, which were used as a comparison. This is concerning for a number of reasons.

For starters, it could be putting a strain on your digestive system, which is forced to work for hours to break down this highly processed food (ironically, most processed food is so devoid of fiber that it gets broken down very quickly, interfering with your blood sugar levels and insulin release).

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When food remains in your digestive tract for such a long time, it will also impact nutrient absorption, but, in the case of processed ramen noodles, there isn’t much nutrition to be had. Instead, there is a long list of additives, including the toxic preservative tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ).

This additive will likely remain in your stomach along with the seemingly invincible noodles, and no one knows what this extended exposure time may do to your health. Common sense suggests it’s not going to be good…

Five Grams of Noodle Preservative, TBHQ, Is Lethal

TBHQ, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is often listed as an “antioxidant,” but it’s important to realize it is a synthetic chemical with antioxidant properties – not a natural antioxidant. The chemical prevents oxidation of fats and oils, thereby extending the shelf life of processed foods.

It’s a commonly used ingredient in processed foods of all kinds (including McDonald’s chicken nuggets, Kellogg’s CHEEZ-IT crackers, Reese’s peanut butter cups, Wheat Thins crackers, Teddy Grahams, Red Baron frozen pizza, Taco Bell beans, and much more).

But you can also find it in varnishes, lacquers, and pesticide products, as well as cosmetics and perfumes to reduce the evaporation rate and improve stability.

At its 19th and 21st meetings, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives determined that TBHQ was safe for human consumption at levels of 0-0.5 mg/kg of body weight.1

However, the Codex commission set the maximum allowable limits up to between 100 to as much as 400 mg/kg, depending on the food it’s added to.2 (Chewing gum is permitted to contain the highest levels of TBHQ.) In the US, the Food and Drug Administration requires that TBHQ must not exceed 0.02 percent of its oil and fat content.3

So there’s quite a discrepancy in supposedly “safe” limits, but it’s probably best to have little or no exposure to this toxicant, as exposure to five grams can be lethal and, according to A Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives, exposure to just one gram of TBHQ can cause:4

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • Delirium
  • Sense of suffocation
  • Collapse

While TBHQ is not suspected to be a persistent toxicant, meaning your body is probably able to eliminate it so that it does not bioaccumulate, if you eat instant noodles your body might be getting prolonged exposures. This is concerning, to say the least. According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), based on animal studies health hazards associated with TBHQ include:5

  • Liver effects at very low doses
  • Positive mutation results from in vitro tests on mammalian cells
  • Biochemical changes at very low doses
  • Reproductive effects at high doses

Eating Instant Noodles Linked to Metabolic Syndrome

If you’re still considering ramen noodles for lunch, you should know a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that women who consumed more instant noodles had a significantly greater risk of metabolic syndrome than those who ate less, regardless of their overall diet or exercise habits.6

Women who ate instant noodles more than twice a week were 68 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome — a group of symptoms such as central obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting blood sugar, elevated fasting triglycerides, and low levels of HDL cholesterol.

Having three or more of the symptoms increases your risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Past research also analyzed overall nutrient intake between instant-noodle consumers and non-consumers, and found, as you might suspect, that eating instant noodles contributes little value to a healthy diet.

The instant noodle consumers had a significantly lower intake of important nutrients like protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, vitamin A, niacin, and vitamin C compared with non-consumers.7 Those who ate instant noodles also had an excessive intake of energy, unhealthy fats and sodium (just one package may contain 2,700 milligrams of sodium).8

What Else Is in a Package of Instant Noodles?

Aside from a lot of sodium and the preservative TBHQ, what else is found in a typical serving of instant noodles?

Prevent Disease reported:9“The dried noodle block was originally created by flash frying cooked noodles, and this is still the main method used in Asian countries, though air-dried noodle blocks are favored in Western countries. The main ingredients of the dried noodle are wheat flour, palm oil, and salt. Common ingredients of the flavoring powder are salt, monosodium glutamate, seasoning, and sugar.

Benzopyrene

…In June 2012, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) found Benzopyrene (a cancer-causing substance) in six brands of noodles made by Nong Shim Company Ltd. Although the KFDA said the amounts were minuscule and not harmful, Nong Shim did identify particular batches of noodles with a problem, prompting a recall by October 2012.”

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

The monosodium glutamate (MSG) in instant noodles is reason enough to avoid them. MSG is an excitotoxin, which means it overexcites your nerve cells to the point of damage or death, causing brain dysfunction and damage to varying degrees — and potentially even triggering or worsening learning disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and more.

Glutamic Acid

Part of the problem is that free glutamic acid (MSG is approximately 78 percent free glutamic acid) is the same neurotransmitter that your brain, nervous system, eyes, pancreas, and other organs use to initiate certain processes in your body. Not to mention, MSG is also used to fatten up mice for scientific study. Yes, MSG is the perfect obesity drug. If you want to achieve your ideal body weight and health, avoid MSG at all costs.

Return to Whole, Living Foods for Optimal Health

Occasionally eating a package of instant noodles clearly won’t kill you, but when you make a habit of substituting convenience foods for real food, it’s only a matter of time before health problems will likely develop.

Instant noodles are a prime example of the types of processed foods you want to avoid as much as possible, as they are virtually guaranteed to make you sick and fat if you indulge too much (and “too much” may be as little as a couple of times a week).

Processed foods encourage weight gain and chronic disease because they’re high in sugar, fructose, refined carbohydrates, and artificial ingredients, and low in nutrients and fiber. Processed foods are addictive and designed to make you overeat; they also encourage excessive food cravings, leading to weight gain.

Eating processed foods also promotes insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, which are hallmarks of most chronic and/or serious diseases. On the other hand, people have thrived on vegetables, meats, eggs, fruits, and other whole foods for centuries, while processed foods were only recently invented.

Ditching processed foods requires that you plan your meals in advance, but if you take it step-by-step as described in my nutrition plan, it’s quite possible, and manageable, to painlessly remove processed foods from your diet.

You can try scouting out your local farmer’s markets for in-season produce that is priced to sell, and planning your meals accordingly, but you can also use this same premise with supermarket sales.

You can generally plan a week of meals at a time, making sure you have all ingredients necessary on hand, and then do any prep work you can ahead of time so that dinner is easy to prepare if you’re short on time (and you can use leftovers for lunches the next day, so you don’t have to resort to instant noodles).

High TSH and low T4 level in early pregnancy associated with higher BMI and weight gain


https://speciality.medicaldialogues.in/high-tsh-and-low-t4-level-in-early-pregnancy-associated-with-higher-bmi-and-weight-gain/

The noodles that are linked to chronic inflammation, weight gain, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s


Instant noodles are a popular go-to lunch or dinner for those who are strapped for time (or cash), like college students. While you probably don’t consider them a health food, you may think they’re not that bad, or, at least, not as bad as eating a burger and fries or a fast-food burrito.

ramen noodles

In a first-of-its-kind experiment, however, Dr. Braden Kuo of Massachusetts General Hospital may make you reconsider your love of instant noodles (assuming you have one).

He used a pill-sized camera to see what happens inside your stomach and digestive tract after you eat ramen noodles, one common type of instant noodles. The results were astonishing.

In the video above, you can see ramen noodles inside a stomach. Even after two hours, they are remarkably intact, much more so than the homemade ramen noodles, which were used as a comparison. This is concerning for a number of reasons.

For starters, it could be putting a strain on your digestive system, which is forced to work for hours to break down this highly processed food (ironically, most processed food is so devoid of fiber that it gets broken down very quickly, interfering with your blood sugar levels and insulin release).

When food remains in your digestive tract for such a long time, it will also impact nutrient absorption, but, in the case of processed ramen noodles, there isn’t much nutrition to be had. Instead, there is a long list of additives, including the toxic preservative tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ).

This additive will likely remain in your stomach along with the seemingly invincible noodles, and no one knows what this extended exposure time may do to your health. Common sense suggests it’s not going to be good…

Five Grams of Noodle Preservative, TBHQ, Is Lethal

TBHQ, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is often listed as an “antioxidant,” but it’s important to realize it is a synthetic chemical with antioxidant properties – not a natural antioxidant. The chemical prevents oxidation of fats and oils, thereby extending the shelf life of processed foods.

It’s a commonly used ingredient in processed foods of all kinds (including McDonald’s chicken nuggets, Kellogg’s CHEEZ-IT crackers, Reese’s peanut butter cups, Wheat Thins crackers, Teddy Grahams, Red Baron frozen pizza, Taco Bell beans, and much more).

But you can also find it in varnishes, lacquers, and pesticide products, as well as cosmetics and perfumes to reduce the evaporation rate and improve stability.

At its 19th and 21st meetings, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives determined that TBHQ was safe for human consumption at levels of 0-0.5 mg/kg of body weight.1

However, the Codex commission set the maximum allowable limits up to between 100 to as much as 400 mg/kg, depending on the food it’s added to.2 (Chewing gum is permitted to contain the highest levels of TBHQ.) In the US, the Food and Drug Administration requires that TBHQ must not exceed 0.02 percent of its oil and fat content.3

So there’s quite a discrepancy in supposedly “safe” limits, but it’s probably best to have little or no exposure to this toxicant, as exposure to five grams can be lethal and, according to A Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives, exposure to just one gram of TBHQ can cause:4

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • Delirium
  • Sense of suffocation
  • Collapse

While TBHQ is not suspected to be a persistent toxicant, meaning your body is probably able to eliminate it so that it does not bioaccumulate, if you eat instant noodles your body might be getting prolonged exposures. This is concerning, to say the least. According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), based on animal studies health hazards associated with TBHQ include:5

  • Liver effects at very low doses
  • Positive mutation results from in vitro tests on mammalian cells
  • Biochemical changes at very low doses
  • Reproductive effects at high doses

Eating Instant Noodles Linked to Metabolic Syndrome

If you’re still considering ramen noodles for lunch, you should know a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that women who consumed more instant noodles had a significantly greater risk of metabolic syndrome than those who ate less, regardless of their overall diet or exercise habits.6

Women who ate instant noodles more than twice a week were 68 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome — a group of symptoms such as central obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting blood sugar, elevated fasting triglycerides, and low levels of HDL cholesterol.

Having three or more of the symptoms increases your risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Past research also analyzed overall nutrient intake between instant-noodle consumers and non-consumers, and found, as you might suspect, that eating instant noodles contributes little value to a healthy diet.

The instant noodle consumers had a significantly lower intake of important nutrients like protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, vitamin A, niacin, and vitamin C compared with non-consumers.7 Those who ate instant noodles also had an excessive intake of energy, unhealthy fats and sodium (just one package may contain 2,700 milligrams of sodium).8

What Else Is in a Package of Instant Noodles?

Aside from a lot of sodium and the preservative TBHQ, what else is found in a typical serving of instant noodles?

Prevent Disease reported:9

“The dried noodle block was originally created by flash frying cooked noodles, and this is still the main method used in Asian countries, though air-dried noodle blocks are favored in Western countries. The main ingredients of the dried noodle are wheat flour, palm oil, and salt. Common ingredients of the flavoring powder are salt, monosodium glutamate, seasoning, and sugar.

Benzopyrene

…In June 2012, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) found Benzopyrene (a cancer-causing substance) in six brands of noodles made by Nong Shim Company Ltd. Although the KFDA said the amounts were minuscule and not harmful, Nong Shim did identify particular batches of noodles with a problem, prompting a recall by October 2012.”

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

The monosodium glutamate (MSG) in instant noodles is reason enough to avoid them. MSG is an excitotoxin, which means it overexcites your nerve cells to the point of damage or death, causing brain dysfunction and damage to varying degrees — and potentially even triggering or worsening learning disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and more.

Glutamic Acid

Part of the problem is that free glutamic acid (MSG is approximately 78 percent free glutamic acid) is the same neurotransmitter that your brain, nervous system, eyes, pancreas, and other organs use to initiate certain processes in your body. Not to mention, MSG is also used to fatten up mice for scientific study. Yes, MSG is the perfect obesity drug. If you want to achieve your ideal body weight and health, avoid MSG at all costs.

Return to Whole, Living Foods for Optimal Health

Occasionally eating a package of instant noodles clearly won’t kill you, but when you make a habit of substituting convenience foods for real food, it’s only a matter of time before health problems will likely develop.

Instant noodles are a prime example of the types of processed foods you want to avoid as much as possible, as they are virtually guaranteed to make you sick and fat if you indulge too much (and “too much” may be as little as a couple of times a week).

Processed foods encourage weight gain and chronic disease because they’re high in sugar, fructose, refined carbohydrates, and artificial ingredients, and low in nutrients and fiber. Processed foods are addictive and designed to make you overeat; they also encourage excessive food cravings, leading to weight gain.

Eating processed foods also promotes insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, which are hallmarks of most chronic and/or serious diseases. On the other hand, people have thrived on vegetables, meats, eggs, fruits, and other whole foods for centuries, while processed foods were only recently invented.

Ditching processed foods requires that you plan your meals in advance, but if you take it step-by-step as described in my nutrition plan, it’s quite possible, and manageable, to painlessly remove processed foods from your diet.

You can try scouting out your local farmer’s markets for in-season produce that is priced to sell, and planning your meals accordingly, but you can also use this same premise with supermarket sales.

You can generally plan a week of meals at a time, making sure you have all ingredients necessary on hand, and then do any prep work you can ahead of time so that dinner is easy to prepare if you’re short on time (and you can use leftovers for lunches the next day, so you don’t have to resort to instant noodles).

 

Scientists Find Fluoride Causes Hypothyroidism Leading To Depression, Weight Gain, and Worse


fluoride

Researchers from the University of Kent, a public research university based in the United Kingdom, conducted the latest and considerably groundbreaking study on the health effects potentially caused by adding fluoride to the public’s water.

After studying data obtained from nearly every medical practice in England, scientists found that fluoride may be increasing the risk for hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce enough hormones, resulting in symptoms such as fatigue, obesity and depression.

Published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the study included the largest population ever analyzed in relation to the adverse health effects caused by water fluoridation.

Recent UK study includes the “largest population ever studied in regard to adverse effects of elevated fluoride exposure”

After collecting data from 99 percent of England’s 8,020 general medical practices, researchers found that the locations with fluoridated water were 30 percent more likely to have high levels of hypothyroidism, compared to areas with low, natural levels of the chemical in the water.

This means that up to 15,000 people could be suffering from depression, weight gain, fatigue and aching muscles, all of which could theoretically be prevented if fluoride were removed from the water, according to The Telegraph.

“Overall, there were 9 percent more cases of underactive thyroid in fluoridated places,” reports Newsweek, which also notes that 10 percent of England’s water is fluoridated compared with nearly 70 percent of America’s.

The science paper also compared the fluoridated city of Birmingham with the city of Manchester, which refrains from fluoridating, and found that doctor’s offices in Birmingham were nearly twice as likely to report high levels of hypothyroidism.

The new report has some experts questioning their stance on water fluoridation.

“The study is an important one because it is large enough to detect differences of potential significance to the health of the population,” said Trevor Sheldon, a medical researcher and dean of the Hill York Medical School who has published numerous studies in this field.

Sheldon, who in the past supported fluoride, admits that the “case for general water fluoridation” is no longer clear.

New fluoride study contradicts last year’s report by Public Health England that states fluoride is “safe and effective” for improving dental health

Released in March of last year, Public Health England’s report states that “there is no evidence of harm to health in fluoridated areas,” and no differences were found between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas in regard to rates of hip fractures, osteosarcoma (a form of bone cancer), cancers overall, Down’s syndrome births and all other recorded causes of death.

New research, however, suggests that the spike in the number of cases of hypothyroidism in areas such as the West Midlands and the North East of England is “concerning for people living in those areas.”

“The difference between the West Midlands, which fluoridates, and Manchester, which doesn’t was particularly striking. There were nearly double the number of cases in Manchester,” said the study’s lead author Stephen Peckham.

Women 15 times more likely to develop underactive thyroid

“Underactive thyroid is a particularly nasty thing to have and it can lead to other long term health problems. I do think councils need to think again about putting fluoride in the water. There are far safer ways to improve dental health.”

Hypothyroidism is particularly a cause for concern for women, as they’re 15 times more likely than men to develop the condition. Previous studies suggest that fluoride inhibits the thyroid’s ability to use iodine, which is an essential mineral for a healthy thyroid, the master gland in the human body.

Americans Are on Average 15 Pounds Heavier Than Two Decades Ago


The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics released a report on the state of weight gain in the country. As sad as it is unsurprising, the report indicates Americans are increasingly getting heavier.

According to statistics gathered from 2011-2014, the average American has put on “15 or more additional pounds without getting any taller,” in comparison to similar figures taken from the late 1980s and early ’90s. This conclusion, published in Health Daily, was taken from an analysis of “19,151 people who underwent medical examinations and were interviewed at home” with a consistent age comparison taken as a control for slowing metabolisms.

In other words, rather than attributing weight gain to one age group getting older, the study took into account a specific age range between each period. For instance, girls aged 11 were on average the study found, “seven pounds heavier even though their height is the same” and for that same boy demographic, “an additional 13.5 pounds compared to two decades ago” with one-inch height in average growth.

Most broadly, the findings reveal that “the average height of men in the United States rose from 181 pounds to 196 pounds” between both periods, with same average height of around 5 feet, 9 inches. For women, they went from “152 pounds to 169 pounds” with a consistent height of “just under 5 feet, 4 inches.”

Another comparison made using the demographic of race followed a similar trend. The study found that African Americans gained more than any other race. On average, black women added 22 pounds despite maintaining their height, while black men, who grew about one-fifth of an inch, added an average 18 pounds.

“We are not doing nearly enough to control and reverse the obesity epidemic and doing far too much to propagate it. This is another notice of that sad fact,” said David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, who was interviewed for the report.

Anthony Comuzzie, an obesity researcher and a scientist with the department of genetics at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio added in an interview that people who used to be on “the high end of normal weight … have likely moved into the overweight category, and those at the high end of the overweight category … into the obese category.” Comuzzie said this is attributable to “less exercise and more access to food that’s rich in calories.”

Comuzzie offered a foreboding conclusion that the U.S. population is still gaining weight at “a fairly rapid rate” and warned of the implications this has for the “overall health of the nation.” More specifically, “there will likely be an associated increase in chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease in the coming years,” he said.

Katz offered an equally worrisome diagnosis.

“There are many active efforts to combat obesity, but our culture at large is in the business of propagating it for profit, from big food to big media to big pharma. It’s that simple. We do much more, across the expanse of our culture, to foster obesity than to defend against it,” he said.

How Stress is Keeping You From Losing Weight


If weight gain isn’t the result of too many calories and too little movement, what is the cause? The top theories include a diverse number of reasons, including:

* Environmental toxins
* Sugars, especially fructose
* Shift work and other causes of insomnia
* High levels of stress
* Noise pollution
* Electromagnetic fields

Many of these may not seem to be obvious causes of weight gain. How could invisible chemicals or loud sounds cause people to pack on the pounds? The one common thread among all of these factors is that each changes adrenal hormones in ways that lead to weight gain. Why is that?

Survival Mode
All mammals are able to control their body weight, even when their food intake goes up or down by a bit. All mammals are also able to gain weight without eating more food when preparing for hibernation or when threatened by famine. “Survival mode” is the phrase given to this storage reaction, and it happens to us too.

When we’re not in survival mode, our main stress hormone, cortisol, has a healthy daily rhythm. The adrenal glands put out a big burst of cortisol in the morning, and as the day goes on they make less and less of it. When things like toxins, noise and stressors send us into survival mode, the timing of cortisol production gets thrown off. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream gets hijacked by the belly fat and is used to enlarge the fat cells.

Once we realize weight gain is a preparation for famine, it becomes clear why eating less food seldom leads to lasting fat loss. When you go on a new diet, your food intake goes down. If your body is already in a state of getting prepared for a food shortage, this only makes it worse.

Stress and Obesity

Even though long-term weight loss won’t happen from pushing yourself harder, it will happen from comforting yourself more effectively. Rather than the old standbys of diet and exercise, the new solutions look more like:

* Meditation
* Yoga
* Regular sleep
* Probiotics
* Journaling
* Detox and cleansing
* Time spent in nature
* Massage

Healing the Cortisol Cycle
All of these solutions can help heal the cortisol production cycle, and this is the ticket to lasting fat loss. The only bad thing about these new solutions is that they take time, and many people just don’t have enough time for the things they already have on their plates.

A simple diet has been shown to heal the same cortisol cycle all by itself. It works because good carbs like squash, buckwheat and navy beans can effectively lower cortisol. Since it’s good to have higher cortisol in the morning and lower cortisol at night, you can eat these carbs into the evening and reset the rhythm.

A group of 42 volunteers tested this diet and showed that, in as little as 30 days, the hormones of fat storage can be fixed [1]. In the study, participants lost an average of nine pounds of fat, and many lost three to five inches around their waists. Other findings: Unlike with typical diets, participants gained energy, had improved sleep quality and noticed greater mental focus.

If your weight has been a struggle, please don’t think that you’re weak-willed or lazy. Once you understand that stress hormones drive weight gain, it becomes clear that feelings of shame and self-doubt by themselves may make the problem worse. Understand that the modern world is full of famine triggers and that your body is just doing what it can to protect itself. The way to being lean and energized comes not through more extreme deprivation, but from more effectively honoring and comforting yourself.

 

Obesity Risk Factors: Although Obesity Can Happen To Anyone, Certain People Are At A Higher Risk Than Others


Recently, it’s become hard to read a newspaper or magazine without coming across at least one article relating to today’s obesity epidemic. While calling it an epidemic may sound strange, considering that more than one-third of American adults are obese, the title is actually quite suitable. Still, despite the fact that certainly anyone is at risk for obesity, there are certain types of people who may be more prone than others.

obese

Those With Obese Parents

Though this is far from a sole determining factor, your genes can affect the amount of body fat you store and where in your body that fat is distributed. According to theMayo Clinic, other fat-related factors, such as metabolism rates and how efficiently you burn calories when exercising, also have genetic roots. However, these genetic dispositions to fat are very weak and easily overcome. It’s more likely that the environment and habits of obese parents contribute more to their children’s weight than their genes will, according to the University of Rochester. When children, all we know is what we observe in our homes. Parents’ eating and activity habits set a precedent for their children’s and may lead them to be more likely to follow them in a lifetime of obesity.

Those Who Recently Gave Up Smoking

A common reason for individuals not to give up smoking is that it may lead to weight gain, and I’m sorry to say it, but they’re right. Of course, not every single person who gives up smoking will gain weight, but enough do that scientists decided to look into what exactly was going on here. According to Time, the average smoker will put on about 10 pounds when initially kicking the habit, but Mayo Clinic added that some individuals can gain much more. I wish that I could tell you that the reason for this weight gain had to do with the disappearance of nicotine’s amazing fat-burning powers, but unfortunately researchers believe it has to do more with personality traits typically shared by most smokers.

“Those who decide they need help to stop smoking tend to lack self-efficacy. They might have similar problems with the dietary and physical activity behaviors important in weight control,” Esteve Fernandez, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Barcelona and Simon Chapman, a professor of public health at the University of Sydney, explained in an editorial on smoking and weight gain. Once again, this weight gain doesn’t occur in all ex-smokers and for those who do experience it, researchers found that the weight gain begins to decrease after about three months.

Those Who Are Mothers

Yet another stereotype that is unfortunately backed by science is women being slightly more likely to become obese after becoming mothers. It’s inevitable for women to gain weight during pregnancy, but for a large number of new mothers, losing the extra weight can be incredibly difficult once the baby is born. Mayo Cliniclists pregnancy as a noteworthy contributor to the development of obesity in women.

For the most part, this may not be entirely their fault. It was previously believed that humans only form new fat cells during infancy and puberty, but according to one pregnancy site, it was found that women actually add new fat cells during the last trimester of pregnancy. Although diet and exercise can shrink fat cells, for the most part, they simply don’t just go away. New mothers will find themselves with new fat cells that evolved as a way to help her and her new baby during times of famine, but in modern times just make losing that extra pregnancy weight extra frustrating.

Those Who Don’t Get Enough Sleep

I know that the last thing that people who don’t get enough sleep need is one more thing to keep them up at night, but numerous studies have shown that loss of zzz’s can increase one’s waistline. Staying up late at night can mess with a person’s hormone levels. Hormones control everything from our sexuality to our appetite. Abnormal sleep patterns can cause your appetite to be altered, and consequently your weight will fluctuate. According to Today Health, people who slept less than eight hours a day had larger increases in body fat than those who slept more. The New York Times found that this trend exists in both adults and children, reporting that the less that both adults and children sleep at night, the more likely they are to be obese.

“There’s something that changes in our brain when we’re sleepy that’s irrespective of how much energy we need,” Dr. Kenneth P Wright Jr., the director of the sleep and chronobiology lab at the University of Colorado at Boulder, explained to The Times.

weighty-issue-stress-and-high-fat-meals-combine-to-slow-metabolism-in-women


A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body’s metabolism, potentially contributing to weight gain.

Researchers questioned study participants about the previous day’s stressors before giving them a meal consisting of 930 calories and 60 grams of fat. The scientists then measured their metabolic rate – how long it took the women to burn calories and fat – and took measures of blood sugar, triglycerides, insulin and the stress hormone cortisol.

On average, the women in the study who reported one or more stressors during the previous 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories than nonstressed women in the seven hours after eating the high-fat meal – a difference that could result in weight gain of almost 11 pounds in one year.

The stressed women also had higher levels of insulin, which contributes to the storage of fat, and less fat oxidation – the conversion of large fat molecules into smaller molecules that can be used as fuel. Fat that is not burned is stored.

“This means that, over time, stressors could lead to weight gain,” said Jan Kiecolt-Glaser, professor of psychiatry and psychology at The Ohio State University and lead author of the study. “We know from other data that we’re more likely to eat the wrong foods when we’re stressed, and our data say that when we eat the wrong foods, weight gain becomes more likely because we are burning fewer calories.”

Previous research also has shown that people who experience stress and other mood disruptions are at higher risk of becoming overweight or obese. This study, the researchers say, appears to illustrate at least one mechanism behind that connection.

The research is published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

The study was conducted in 58 women, average age 53, and included two admissions to Ohio State’s Clinical Research Center for daylong analyses. To regulate their food intake for 24 hours before eating the high-fat meal, researchers supplied the participants with three standardized meals on the previous day and instructed them to fast for 12 hours before reporting for their study visit.

On the day of admission, the participants completed several questionnaires to assess their depressive symptoms and physical activity and were interviewed about stressful events on the prior day. Thirty-one women reported at least one prior day stressor on one visit and 21 reported stressors at both visits. Six women reported no stressors.

Most of the reported stressors were interpersonal in nature: arguments with co-workers or spouses, disagreements with friends, trouble with children or work-related pressures.

The research meal consisted of eggs, turkey sausage, biscuits and gravy – roughly equivalent in calories and fat to a loaded two-patty hamburger and French fries at a fast-food restaurant. Participants were required to eat the entire meal within 20 minutes.

“This is not an extraordinary meal compared to what many of us would grab when we’re in a hurry and out getting some food,” said Kiecolt-Glaser, also director of the Institute for Behavioral Medicine at Ohio State.

The control for comparison in this randomized trial was that one meal contained saturated fat and another was high in a different kind of fat: sunflower oil containing monounsaturated fat, which is associated with a variety of health benefits.

“We suspected that the saturated fat would have a worse impact on metabolism in women, but in our findings, both high-fat meals consistently showed the same results in terms of how stressors could affect their energy expenditure,” said Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition at Ohio State and a co-author of the study.

Before the meal, participants rested for 30 minutes and their energy expenditure – or calories burned by converting food to energy – was tested during that time. After they ate their meal, their metabolic rate was tested for 20 minutes of every hour for the next seven hours. Researchers obtained this data by using equipment that measured inhaled and exhaled airflow of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

“By measuring the gas exchange, we can determine their metabolic rate: how much energy their body needs during the time being measured,” Belury said. “The participants burned fewer calories over the seven hours after the meal when they had a stressor in their life the day before the meal.”

Researchers also took multiple blood samples “so we could follow throughout the day what was happening metabolically after eating the high-fat meal,” Kiecolt-Glaser said.

The stressors’ effects of increasing insulin had a time element: Insulin spiked soon after the high-fat meal was consumed and then decreased to roughly match insulin levels in nonstressed women after another 90 minutes.

A history of depression alone did not affect metabolic rate, but depression combined with previous stressors led to a steeper immediate rise in triglycerides after the meal. Triglycerides are a form of fat in the blood, and high levels are considered a risk for cardiovascular disease.

“With depression, we found there was an additional layer. In women who had stress the day before and a history of depression, triglycerides after the meal peaked the highest,” Kiecolt-Glaser said. “The double whammy of past depression as well as daily stressors was a really bad combination.”

The researchers are reluctant to extend these findings to men because men tend to have more muscle than women, which would affect their metabolic rate, Belury said.

But the findings do offer one more motivation to keep healthful foods nearby.

“We know we can’t always avoid stressors in our life, but one thing we can do to prepare for that is to have healthy food choices in our refrigerators and cabinets so that when those stressors come up, we can reach for something healthy rather than going to a very convenient but high-fat choice,” Belury said.