With INFANTICIDE now a core “value” of Democrats, all decent, life-loving human beings must denounce the Democrat party


Image: With INFANTICIDE now a core “value” of Democrats, all decent, life-loving human beings must denounce the Democrat party

There’s no two ways about it anymore: the Democrat Party is evil beyond words. And with the Democrats’ recent voting down of a bill, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, that would have protected the lives of newly-born children from being murdered alive by abortionists, it’s now undeniably evident that there’s no possible way for decent human beings who support human rights and life in general to, in any way, identify as Democrats.

As if their love for abortion wasn’t already bad enough, today’s Democrats see nothing wrong with delivering the child victims of failed abortions and allowing them to die on the delivery table, all in the name of “reproductive rights” and “choice.” This newfound adoption of infanticide, a.k.a. baby murder, as one of their core “values” proves once and for all that Democrats hate human life, and openly embrace the “progressive” policy of murdering babies after they’ve already left the womb.

We might as well start referring to the Democrat Party as the Death Party – the party that will “cry” over the deaths of children whenever it suits their agenda of trying to scrap the Second Amendment, but that hoots, hollers, cheers, and claps when legislation is passed and signed that allows newborn babies to be chopped into bits and trashed as “medical waste” upon breathing their first breath of air.

There’s certainly no place for real Christians in the Democrat Party, which embraces pretty much every evil thing that the Bible condemns. Whether it’s brainwashing innocent children into believing that there are unlimited genders, or silencing free speech about the dangers of vaccines, the Democrat Party wants to destroy all that is good and wholesome, and replace it with every type of vice and wickedness.

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For more related news about the evil agenda of the Democrat Party and its army of “resistance” Leftists, be sure to check out LiberalMob.com and Libtards.news.

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Things have taken a major turn for the worse since 2002, when a bipartisan Senate UNANIMOUSLY affirmed that born-alive children are human beings deserving of life

Believe it or not, it wasn’t that long ago that Democrats, or at least some of them, still had some level of conscience within their beings. Back in 2002, in fact, Democrats in the Senate unanimously, along with Republicans, voted to pass the Born Alive Infant Protection Act. This bill recognized all born children as “human persons,” affording them the same rights and protections as all other humans.

But somehow over the years, the Democrat Party decided that granting human life status to newborn babies infringed upon “women’s rights,” and here we are today.

“In just over a decade and a half, Democrats have gone from ‘safe, legal, and rare abortions’ to ‘kill ’em all and don’t stop when they’re born,’” writes Matt Walsh for The Daily Wire. “Many of us warned that the first slogan would lead eventually to the second. We take no pleasure in our vindication.”

As you may recall, it was the Republican Party that had to step up to the plate in the past to stamp out another evil known as slavery, which was openly embraced by the Democrat Party. And it’s now up to Republicans once again to intervene on behalf of society’s most vulnerable, unborn and newborn babies, to protect them from the Democrat Party death cult.

“It is probably not a coincidence that the Democrat Party, through its long and sordid history, has supported both of those peculiar institutions,” Walsh adds about the Democrats’ support for both slavery and baby murder.

“What a force for evil it has been. But what amazing consistency – to always fall on the wrong side of every human rights issue.”

Americans being poisoned into psychosis, violence and insanity by prescription drugs and heavy metals.


Are people in the United States actually becoming more aggressive and violent, or is it merely a misperception caused by slanted news coverage?

Psychosis

Certainly we are exposed to far more neurotoxins than prior generations, and in much higher doses, in the form of the plethora of industrial chemicals that surround us and permeate every part of our environment. And while many different toxins are known to produce neurobehavioral effects, two categories in particular are worthy of further consideration: psychiatric drugs and heavy metals. Heavy metals such as lead and mercury are, of course, already well-known to cause brain damage and behavioral disturbances. Psychiatric drugs, likewise, are actually designed to alter the function of the brain — that is, if they disrupt your brain’s chemical equilibrium, it means they are working as designed.

Doping the people without cause

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, antidepressants are among the top three most prescribed classes of therapeutic drugs in non-hospital settings. Yet even people who know of these drugs’ common metabolic and sexual side effects are often not aware that they can regularly produce psychiatric disturbances as well including anxiety, irritability and agitation. Nearly all antidepressants can also actually increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

Yet shockingly, a recent study in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found that more than 67 percent of those taking antidepressants had “never met the criteria for major depressive disorder” — that is, the condition that the drugs are supposedly meant to treat.

In addition, a full 38 percent of those taking the SSRI class of antidepressants have never been diagnosed with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder or social phobia.

“Many individuals who are prescribed and use antidepressant medications may not have met criteria for mental disorders,” the researchers wrote. “Our data indicate that antidepressants are commonly used in the absence of clear evidence-based indications.”

While antidepressants may be the most commonly prescribed of psychiatric drugs, they are not the only ones with mood- and behavior-altering side effects. The anti-smoking drug Chantix, for example, can cause “changes in behavior, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions,” according to the company that makes it. Indeed, as with antidepressants, any drug designed to modify the brain’s chemistry may change a person’s behavior, including for the worse.

According to the mental health watchdog group Citizens’ Commission on Human Rights, “Despite 22 international drug regulatory warnings on psychiatric drugs citing effects of mania, hostility, violence and even homicidal ideation, and dozens of high profile shootings/killings tied to psychiatric drug use, there has yet to be a federal investigation on the link between psychiatric drugs and acts of senseless violence.”

The group maintains a database of known psychiatric drug side effects at here.

Brain-damaging metals are everywhere

Another category of brain-damaging toxins that nearly all people are exposed to is heavy metals. Because these metals are so widely used in industrial manufacturing, they have permeated the environment and are now found in everything from air pollution and soil to household products such as electronics and even sewage sludge (which is spread on food crops as fertilizer).

Among the metals known to damage the brain and produce cognitive and behavioral effects are lead, mercury, aluminum and manganese.

As Natural News editor Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, has pointed out, even people seeking to protect themselves from radioactivity exposure may inadvertently dose themselves with heavy metals. Zeolites, marketed for their ability to bind to radioactive isotopes and flush them from the body, all contain high levels of lead and aluminum. When zeolites are ground up, these toxins become even more bioavailable.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/051912_psychosis_Big_Pharma_heavy_metals.html#ixzz3rZZ0sITH

Scientists find way to cut blood loss by 90% – by spraying foam made from shrimp shells .


A sprayable foam could help first responders stop bleeding from major injuries at an accident site or combat zone (Image from acs.org)

A sprayable foam could help first responders stop bleeding from major injuries at an accident site or combat zone (Image from acs.org)

Injuries and violence account for nearly 1 out of every 10 deaths worldwide each year, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As many as 5.8 million people of all ages and social backgrounds die from violence-related injuries every year, the health protection agency says.

For some limb injuries, doctors can apply pressure to effectively halt the bleeding. The problem is that when dealing with certain injuries – trauma to the torso in particular – compression is not an option.

Reuters / Shamil Zhumatov

Meanwhile, “hemorrhage (severe blood loss) from traumatic injury is a leading cause of death for soldiers in combat and for young civilians,” Matthew Dowling and colleagues at the University of Maryland wrote in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, adding that the majority of hemorrhages that prove fatal are “non-compressible.

The researchers added: “Currently, there is no effective way to treat such injuries.”

A solution has been found, however. “In this initial study, we demonstrate that a sprayable polymer-based foam can be effective at treating bleeding from soft tissue without the need for compression.”

The active material in the foam is a modified chitosan (a biopolymer derived from the shells of shrimp and other crustaceans), which “physically connects blood cells into clusters via hydrophobic interactions.”

When the unique foam is sprayed into an open cavity created by injury, it expands and forms a self-supporting barrier that counteracts the expulsion of blood from the cavity, the researchers say.

They have already tested their sprayed foam for its ability to arrest bleeding from an injury to the liver in pigs. The bleeding was stopped “within minutes” and without the need for external compression, the researchers reported. Blood loss was cut by 90 percent.

Cartoons kill’: Kids’ movies show more death than adult ones, study finds.


AFP Photo/Str

The number of onscreen deaths of main characters in children’s films is two-and-a-half times greater than in movies for adult audiences, a survey that examined 45 of the highest-grossing animated flicks in history revealed.

“Rather than being the innocuous form of entertainment they are assumed to be, children’s animated films are rife with on-screen death and murder,” a survey published by the BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) this week said.

According to the researchers from University College London and the University of Ottawa, the death of an important character occurred in two thirds of children’s animated films, with the figure for adult flicks standing at around a half.

The deaths in movies for kids are often violent, which “might be more traumatic for children”, the survey entitled ‘Cartoons kill’ said.

The surveyed movies included three gunshot deaths (Bambi, Peter Pan, Pocahontas), two stabbings (Sleeping Beauty, The Little Mermaid) and five animal attacks (A Bug’s Life, The Croods, How to Train Your Dragon, Finding Nemo and Tarzan).

The demise of main characters was likely to happen in the early minutes of children’s animation, the survey said, like in Finding Nemo where Nemo’s mom is eaten alive by a barracuda at 04:03 and Tarzan where a leopard kills Tarzan’s parents at 04:08.

In general, the parents were five times more likely to perish in kid’s films than in movies for older audiences.

The survey examined 45 of the highest-grossing animated films in history – from 1937’s Snow White to last year’s blockbuster Frozen.

The adult films they were matched against consisted of the two highest box office grossing movies in the same year as each animated film was released, including horror and thriller flicks like The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Pulp Fiction, The Departed and Black Swan.

The researchers advised the parents to “consider watching such movies alongside their children, in the event that the children need emotional support after witnessing the inevitable horrors that will unfold.”

However, onscreen death is not only bad for kids as films, which model “appropriate grief responses could help children to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of death.”

As an example, the survey uses The Lion King, in which a lion cub forgives the murder of his father in order to cope with his loss.

“Films depicting death in this more nuanced way could provide a valuable resource for initiating discussions about death between children and adults. Indeed, cinematherapy is sometimes used to facilitate counseling with grieving adolescents, a therapeutic practice that might be extended to younger children,” the researches explained.

Inmate’s family sues Ohio after ‘agonizing’ execution with untested drug protocol — RT USA


 

Reuters / HandoutConvicted killer Dennis McGuire struggled noticeably for his life during a lengthy lethal injection procedure in Ohio on Thursday, and now his family plans to sue the state for violating his Constitutional rights.

A press conference is scheduled for Friday, where the executed man’s children, Amber and Dennis McGuire, and their attorneys will argue the state violated their father’s right to be free of “cruel and unusual punishment.”

In what amounted to an unusually long time for a lethal injection, it took McGuire about 25 minutes to die after being injected with an untested combination of drugs that had never been used before in an execution in the United States.

For about 10 minutes, the controversial cocktail of midazolam and hydromorphone resulted in McGuire “struggling and gasping loudly for air, making snorting and choking sounds that lasted for at least 10 minutes, with his chest heaving and his fist clenched. Deep, rattling sounds emanated from his mouth,” as reported by the Columbus Dispatch.

Soon after McGuire’s death, his attorney Allen Bohnert called the execution “a failed, agonizing experiment by the state of Ohio.”

“The court’s concerns expressed earlier this week have been confirmed,” Bohnert added, according to the Associated Press. “And more importantly, the people of the state of Ohio should be appalled at what was done here today in their names.”

Last week, Bohnert tried to argue that McGuire was at risk of “agony and terror” since the new drug combination could cut off his air supply as he died, but the plea ultimately failed as judges ruled in favor of the state.

The use of midazolam, in particular, has been called into question in the past, as critics believe it leaves inmates aware of their surroundings and in extreme pain as they die.

Dennis McGuire.(AFP Photo / Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction)Dennis McGuire.(AFP Photo / Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction)

“I watched his stomach heave,” said Amber McGuire in a statement, according to the Dispatch. “I watched him try to sit up against the straps on the gurney. I watched him repeatedly clench his fist. It appeared to me he was fighting for his life but suffocating.”

McGuire was originally convicted of raping and killing a pregnant Joy Stewart back in 1994. His pleas for clemency had been denied, and Stewart’s family issued the following statement on the situation surrounding McGuire’s death.

“There has been a lot of controversy regarding the drugs that are to be used in his execution, concern that he might feel terror, that he might suffer. As I recall the events preceding her death, forcing her from the car, attempting to rape her vaginally, sodomizing her, choking her, stabbing her, I know she suffered terror and pain. He is being treated far more humanely than he treated her.”

The behavior of Ohio and other states that condone the death penalty have come under fire since most of the companies that traditionally manufacture the drugs used in lethal injections – generally based in Europe and which are against capital punishment – have halted sales to state correctional departments.

In an effort to replace diminishing supplies of sedatives and paralytics, many states have begun experimenting with alternative drug mixtures, including products typically used to euthanize animals.

As the AP noted, Bohnert has urged Ohio Governor John Kasich to place a moratorium on executions following McGuire’s death. According to the Dispatch, at least one judge, Gregory L. Frost of the U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, cast suspicion on the state’s behavior concerning executions in 2013.

“Ohio has been in a dubious cycle of defending often indefensible conduct, subsequently reforming its protocol when called on that conduct, and then failing to follow through on its own reforms,” he wrote in an unrelated case last year.

 

Climate Change and Violence.


An analysis of 60 studies finds that warmer temperatures and extreme rainfall lead to a rise in violence.

Image

In the coming decades, the world’s changing climate could herald a rise in violence at every scale—from individuals to nations, from assault to war—according to a comprehensive new analysis of the link between climate and conflict.

Analyzing data from 60 earlier studies, Solomon Hsiang from the University of California, Berkeley, found that warmer temperatures and extremes in rainfall can substantially increase the risk of many types of conflict. For every standard deviation of change, levels of interpersonal violence, such as domestic violence or rape, rise by some 4 percent, while the frequency of intergroup conflict, from riots to civil wars, rise by 14 percent. Global temperatures are expected to rise by at least two standard deviations by 2050, with even bigger increases in the tropics.

“The paper is remarkably strong,” said Thomas Homer-Dixon, an environmental and political scientist at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, who was not involved in the study. “[It means] the world will be a very violent place by mid-century if climate change continues as projected.”

Hsiang, together with UC Berkeley colleagues Marshall Burke and Edward Miguel, focused only on studies that provided the strongest evidence for a causal connection. “The ideal thing would be to take two identical Earths, heat one up and watch how conflict evolves,” said Hsiang dryly. “We can’t do that, so we looked for these natural experiments.”

The researchers ignored any studies that compared levels of conflict between different countries, which also differ in their history, culture, and politics. Instead, they focused on data that revealed how violence rises and falls in a single place as climate changes.

For example, crime statistics in the United States reveal that the number of rapes, murders, or assaults increases on a hot day. Civil conflicts in the tropics become twice as frequent during the hot and dry years caused by El Niño events. Farmers in Brazil are more likely to invade each other’s land if they have a particularly wet or dry year. And Chinese dynasties all collapsed during long dry periods.

The team analyzed these studies and more using a common statistical framework to control for any biases on the part of the individual authors. Together, the data sets stretch back to 10,000 BC, and cover all major world regions. They represent the collective efforts of more than 190 researchers working across varied disciplines, from psychologists looking at the effects of temperature on aggressive behavior to archaeologists studying levels of violence in the ancient civilizations.

Despite this diversity, “we were shocked at how well the results from all these fields lined up,” said Hsiang. “Given how some people had been talking, we thought they’d be all over the map,” but the data consistently showed that temperature and rainfall affect violence, across locations, times and disciplines.

“This is a contested area and the convergence of results in this meta-analysis represents a significant step forward,” said Neil Adger, an environmental geographer at the University of Exeter, who was not involved in the study. He notes that responses to climate change, such as “widespread growing of biofuels or displacing populations to build dams” could exacerbate any increased propensity for conflict. “The impacts of climate change will factor large in the future, especially if the world is already fractured and unequal,” he said.

David Zhang, a geographer from the University of Hong Kong who was not involved in the study, said the results were robust and important. However, he noted that most of the data sets cover the last century, and the effects of climate on conflict, may have differed across centuries of human history. Hsiang acknowledges this gap, but said that a few century-spanning data sets have found similar trends.

“Another obvious criticism is that older societies may not be a good analogue for modern ones,” Hsiang added. For example, technological advances might help us to adapt to changing climate more effectively than past generations.

Hsiang also emphasized that climate is just one of many factors that influence the frequency of conflict, and that his study does not address why such a link between conflict and climate exists. Shifts in climate could change the availability of important resources like water or crops, leading to failing economies, weaker governments, and more incentives to fight or rebel. They could also lead to mass migration, rapid urbanization, or growing inequalities.

“We now want to understand what the underlying mechanisms are,” said Hsiang. “If we understand them, we could come up with policies that could decouple climate and conflict, which might help society to adapt. That’s a good reason to push the research ahead.”

Source: http://www.the-scientist.com

Brief Emergency Department Intervention to Reduce Teen Dating Violence.


Among teens with a history of dating violence, effectiveness of the intervention depended on the baseline level of violence.
Investigators evaluated the effectiveness of the SafERteens intervention for reducing dating violence among adolescents presenting to an emergency department (ED). The 35-minute bedside intervention involves goal setting, feedback, decision-balancing exercises, and role-playing scenarios. In the SafERteens study, 726 patients aged 14 to 18 years with a history of aggression or violence and alcohol use in the previous year were randomized to one of three groups: intervention delivered by computer, intervention delivered by a therapist with computer assistance, or a standard brochure about resources (control). Participants were followed up with self-assessments 3, 6, and 12 months after the ED visit.

This secondary analysis included 397 adolescents (36% male) with a history of dating violence. The computer-only group, compared to controls, had a reduction in moderate dating violence (e.g., slapped, hair pulled, shoved) at 3 months and 6 months, but not at 12 months. Neither intervention had an effect on severe dating violence (e.g., punched, choked, knife or gun used). Adolescents with a baseline moderate level and high frequency (>8 times per year) of dating violence had a decrease in moderate dating violence at 6 and 12 months; those with a baseline severe level and high frequency had a decrease in severe violence at 3 months.

COMMENT

Emergency physicians are in a unique position to capitalize on many “teachable moments.” While much remains to be learned as to the best interventions for reducing teen dating violence, we should not miss these opportunities — such as when caring for a beaten teen — to help our patients make wiser choices.

Source: NEJM