A Daily Dose of Viagra Gave Test Subjects a Valuable Health Benefit


By sustaining erections where limpness once prevailed, Viagra has vastly improved the sex lives of many people. But the little blue pill, it turns out, may be useful outside the bedroom as well. In March, researchers discovered that the popular erectile dysfunction drug can play a potentially life-saving role in another body part — the colon.

The scientists, publishing their findings in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, showed that a small daily dose of Viagra played a role in preventing colon cancer, at least in mice.

Using mice engineered to be predisposed to growing colon polyps — abnormal cell clumps that can sometimes become cancerous — the scientists tested whether a small daily dose of Viagra could prevent the development of colon cancer in the mice. Specifically, they were looking at the effect of sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, on the rate of polyp formation. The daily dose, administered through the drinking water of the mice, reduced polyp formation and colon inflammation by 50 percent.

viagra
When administered to mice in small doses, Viagra reduced the rate of formation for polyps, cell clumps that could become cancerous.

The study built upon previous work suggesting that Viagra inhibits an enzyme in colon cells that boosts cell proliferation. The more that cells multiply, the more opportunities they have to pick up mutations that can lead to cancer, so suppressing cell proliferation. While the researchers don’t know exactly how Viagra is working its magic in these mice just yet, they know that reducing the rate of polyp formation is one promising way to prevent the development of colon cancer (and prevent the painful rectal bleeding that colon polyps cause, whether they’re cancerous or not).

Viagra, for its part, has proven to be useful in solving other medical problems. It’s used to treat premature babies with pulmonary hypertension, a deadly condition in which blood pressure rises in the lungs, and its been shown to help treat prostate cancer when used in tandem with another cancer-fighting drug.

Not that everything went well for Viagra in 2018. An ongoing problem for United States public health experts is the ongoing popularity of vape liquids that contain erectile dysfunction drugs and the danger they pose to users. Not regulated by any medical authority, these widely available vape liquids contain unknown amounts of sildefanil and taladafil (the active ingredient in the erectile dysfunction drug Cialis), which themselves may be counterfeit. One account even claimed it gave a user a two-day erection.

UC Irvine Accidentally Invents a Battery that Lasts Forever


What do Viagra, popsicles, Corn Flakes, Ivory soap, the kitchen microwave, and champagne have in common? They were all discovered by accident. Add ultra-long-lasting nanowire batteries to that list, thanks to a team of researchers at the University of California Irvine. The average laptop battery is rated anywhere from 300 to 500 charge cycles – completely full to completely empty to completely full again – longer if you don’t use it all up before recharging. The UCI nanobattery endured 200,000 charge cycles over three months “with 94–96% average Coulombic efficiency.” It was effectively still brand new at the end of the experiment.

Let’s go conservative and say the average laptop battery lasts for 1,000 charge cycles, its capacity noticeably diminished after about two years. If that laptop had UCI’s nanobattery it would easily last for 400 years (if 1,000 cycles = two years, 200,000 cycles = 400 years). That’s long enough for that laptop to share a name with, but be far less useful than, an actual brick. If UCI can apply its findings to commercial uses, there’s a revolution coming throughout the electronic landscape.

The advance happened when UCI doctoral candidate Mya Le Thai “was playing around” in the lab and coated a set of gold nanowires in manganese dioxide, then applied a “Plexiglas-like” electrolyte gel. Under normal circumstances, nanowires – highly conductive but thousands of times thinner than a human hair – are useless after no more than 8,000 charge cycles because their fragility causes them to crack during charge and discharge loads. At the end of three months, however, the researchers found the nanowires in Thai’s gel-coated battery still intact. They suspect that the gel “plasticizes the metal oxide in the battery,” imbuing the nanowires with flexibility, which equals longevity. Thai said, “The coated electrode holds its shape much better.” The school published its findings in the American Chemical Society journal Energy Letters.

UC Irvine Battery
We’re a long way from an immortal, practical battery, though. In 2007 scientists at Stanford came up with a nanowire configuration that got a nanobattery through 40,000 charge cycles. The lead researcher said at the time that manufacturing needed “one or two different steps, but… it’s a well understood process.” Nine years later we’re still carrying charging bricks and fighting over public USB ports.

13 Alternatives to Viagra That Won’t Fall Flat


Viagra is a multi-billion dollar blockbuster drug, but it has serious side effects. Thankfully evidence-based natural alternatives abound…

Erectile dysfunction is no trivial matter. In fact, Dr. Mercola correctly labeled it ‘the canary in the trousers,’ insofar as dysfunction ‘where it counts’ reflects body-wide endothelial dysfunction, a well known precursor to cardiovascular disease.

But putting aside its importance for overall health, the male ego depends in large part on the ability to ‘get it up,’ and when things don’t work out as planned, quite a lot can go wrong as far as intimacy is concerned. It has been said that when sexual issues emerge in a relationship, they take on 90% importance, but when they aren’t an issue, they only figure 10% in the overall success of the relationship.

viagra_natural_alternatives

Men, especially in the 35-45 range, also are faced with what is known as andropause, as the levels of key ‘erotic’ hormones such as testosterone and human growth human start to take a precipitous decline.

The pharmaceutical industry has capitalized heavily on this ‘change of life’ phase, with Viagra taking on a ‘pole position’ for several decades. But these pharmaceuticals have severe, if not sometimes deadly side effects. All the more reason why natural alternatives are in great need today.

So, what does the ‘hard evidence’ itself have to say on the topic of natural alternatives. Take a moment to look at what we have found:

  • L-arginine: #1 on the list is the amino acid l-arginine. A precursor to nitric oxide, this conditionally non-essential amino acid is especially important in times of trauma or stress. What makes is ‘conditionally essential’ is that while the body can normally produce adequate quantities, during times of stress (including burn trauma), the body is unable to produce sufficient quantities, at which time supplementation is of key importance. Also, when the arteries undergo what is called ‘endothelial dysfunction,’ and are incapable of dilating sufficiently, adding additional l-arginine can correct the condition by inducing nitric oxide up-regulation, subsequently increasing blood flow, which can lead to resolution of cardiovascular dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction. We have indexed no less than six clinical studies on l-arginine, either alone or in combination with another nutraceutical, indicating it can contribute to a reversal of erectile dysfunction. You can view the studies here.
  • Pycnogenol: This amazing substance has a wide range of health benefits. In fact, we have indexed over 80 evidence-based health applications here. When it comes to erectile dysfunction, pycnogenol figures as a profound synergist, working to amplify the benefits of l-arginine to the point where two separate clinical studies found the combination highly effective and safe in resolving erectile dysfunction.[1][2]
  • Panax Ginseng: This amazing Asian herb has been used for thousands of years to increase stamina and longevity. There is now a sizable body of scientific evidence supporting its traditional folkoric use, with a 2008 meta-analysis of the extant research on the topic, which looked at 7 randomized clinical trials to ascertain its value in erectile dysfunction, concluding: “Collectively these RCTs provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of red ginseng in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.”[3]
  • Maca: this South American tuber, both a food and medicine, and long identified as a means to increasing fertility and libido in both men and woman, was found in a 2009 clinical trial to have a significant effect “…on subjective perception of general and sexual well-being in adult patients with mild ED.”[4]
  • Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia): Like most traditional herbs, Tongkat Ali has had a variety of traditional uses, including as an “antimalarial, aphrodisiac, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, and antipyretic [fever-reducer].”[5] As far as its libido enhancing properties, two preclinical trials have found it effective in the animal model at improving sexual performance, confirming its aphrodisiacal properites.[6],[7]
  • Saffron: this sacred spice, highly prized as both a culinary ingredient and medicine, has been studied to have significant effects in reversing erectile dysfunction at doses of 200 mg a day. A 2009 study found: “Saffron showed a positive effect on sexual function with increased number and duration of erectile events seen in patients with ED even only after taking it for ten days.”[8]
  • Yohimbe: This potent herb has been found effective when combined with l-arginine to improve erectile dysfunction. A 2002 study concluded: “oral administration of the L-arginine glutamate 6g and 6 mg yohimbine combination is effective in improving erectile function in patients with mild to moderate ED.”[9] [Warning: Yohimbe and its active ingredient yohimbine is a potent nutraceutical with possible severe side effects such as hypertension. It is advisable to use it only under the guidance of a physician or medical herbalist to avoid possible side effects, especially if already using prescription drugs.]
  • Tribulis: This potent herb has libido enhancing properties for both men and women. We recently featured a study showing it helps women to increase their libido. The preclinical research on male libido is promising, with no less than three studies indicating its benefits for erectile dysfunction.[10][11][12]
  • Green Tea: A highly provocative animal study from 2008 indicates that green tea may address both the origin of erectile dysfunction by diminishing atherosclerotic progression in the corpus cavernosum of the male rat penis, subsequently indicating improvement in both erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular health.[13] This is, in fact, not the first study to show that green tea can correct endothelial dysfunction.[14]
  • Exercise: One of the best ways to improve your body image, self-esteem, and sexual vitality is through exercise. A 2009 study found that physical inactivity contributes to erectile dysfunction – essentially a no-brainer.[15]
  • A Sense of Humor: Living life with a negative attitude, especially when afflicted with a health condition, doesn’t reflect well as far as sexuality is concerned. A remarkable 2008 study found that viewing humorous films in patients with atopic dermatitis leads to short-term improvement of erectile dysfunction.[16] While we don’t know for sure if this study extends to everyone with the condition, it is instructive, perhaps, to look at a degree of levity and light-heartedness as an essential precondition to alleviating some degree of sexual dysfunction. Sex should be fun, right? So lighten up by increasing you humor and joy, whenever possible.
  • AVOID STATIN DRUGS: One of the primary precepts of functional medicine is to avoid the cause of disease, rather than just suppress the symptoms. Statin drugs are well-known to adversely affect the male gonads, as well as reducing both testosterone and libido, leading to the well known consequence of statin-induced erectile dysfunction. Take a look at these 7 clinical studies if you need convincing that this side effect is read.Were statins effective at preventing heart disease, it would be difficult to reject them. But the fact that they are cardiotoxic makes it all the more questionable to continue on them, especially considering the severe quality of life issues they generate, including erectile dysfunction. Please share with your physician our research page on the 300+ adverse effects of statins to come up with a more reasonable approach to cardiovascular disease prevention.
  • AVOID Anti-Depressants: Perhaps surprisingly, antidepressant drugs have been found to be a major cause of sexual dysfunction. A 2006 study found that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), e.g. Prozac, Paxil, are associated with sexual dysfunction in 95.6% of women and 97.9% men.[17] What a misnomer! What could be more depressing than killing your sexual desire with a pharmaceutical Band-Aid?

Ultimately, sexual dysfunction begins in the brain. Nothing can eliminate a dysfunctional relationship or a lack of intimacy that often follows from it. While natural interventions exist – Ginseng, Arginine, Tribulus, etc. – it should be remembered that that erectile dysfunction stems from more than just physiological issues. A lack of desire may reflect a lack of appreciation for one’s own self, body image, or sense of sensuality. Nonetheless, it is good to know that alternatives to pharmaceuticals like Viagra exist, and are evidence-based, safer and time-tested. Moreover, it is important to acknowledge that the ‘canary in the trousers’ often reflects cardiovascular dysfunction body-wide, and the best way to address that is through a radical transformation of the diet, focusing on a grain and dairy-free ancestral diet rich in high nutrient, low carbohydrate vegetables, tubers and fruits and berries, as well as high quality natural fats and protein sources that are consistent with our biological heritage.

Article References

Viagra ‘added to Chinese alcohol


 

Viagra pill - file picture
The powdered Viagra was added to a popular spirit, investigators say

Distillers in China added Viagra to thousands of bottles of spirits and told customers it had “health-preserving qualities”, food safety officials say.

More than 5,300 bottles of alcohol were seized by the investigators in the southern city of Liuzhou.

They also found packets of a white powder called Sildenafil, better known as the anti-impotence drug Viagra.

Police in the Guangxi region are now investigating the two distillers.

The Liuzhou Food and Drug Administration said (in Chinese) that the powder was added to three different types of ‘baijiu’ – a strong, clear spirit that is the most popular drink in China.

They said the haul was worth up to 700,000 yuan (£72,000; $113,000).

Doctors recommend that adults requiring prescription should take only one dose of Viagra a day, with a lower dose for those over the age of 65.

China continues to face widespread food safety problems.

In June, police in cities across China seized more than 100,000 tonnes of smuggled meat, some of which was several years old.

The 2008 tainted milk scandal outraged the nation.

Some 300,000 people were affected and at least six babies died after consuming milk adulterated with melamine.

Viagra And Other Erectile Dysfunction Drugs Vary In Effectiveness, Side Effects


viagra side effects
Viagra is the most effective treatment for erectile dysfunction, but it also has a higher rate of side effects than other options. 

Viagra is known generically as sildenafil. Men concerned about possible side effects of Viagra like headaches, flushing, indigestion and nasal congestion may want to start on Cialis, which is known generically as tadalafil, researchers report in European Urology. If that’s not effective, men in some countries can try Zydena (udenafil).

Many men have trouble getting or keeping an erection, especially as they age, but erectile dysfunction – also known as ED – is not a natural part of aging, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

The new review compares seven common ED therapies, all belonging to a class of medications called phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i’s). They work by inhibiting an enzyme that may reduce the potency of an erection.

Viagra, Cialis, Levitra (vardenafil) and Stendra (avanafil) all work this way and are approved for use in the U.S. The additional drugs Zydena, Helleva (lodenafil) and Mvix (mirodenafil) are only approved for use in other countries.

PDE5i’s are considered the first-choice therapy for ED, but they’re only effective for 60 to 80 percent of men who try them, and many will stop taking them, according to Dr. Alexander W. Pastuszak of Baylor College of Medicine’s urology department in Houston, Texas. He was not part of the new study.

Researchers at the University of Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands reviewed 82 studies of the drugs’ effectiveness and 72 studies exploring side effects.

These treatments are all more effective than placebo for treating erectile dysfunction, and are generally safe and well tolerated, the authors note.

A 50- or 100-milligram (mg) dose of Viagra appeared to be the most effective treatment. It performed about 50 percent better than a placebo. Smaller doses were less effective. Stendra, in doses ranging from 50 to 200 mg, was among the least effective – only 20 to 30 percent more effective than a placebo.

The 50-milligram dose of Stendra was associated with the lowest rate of side effects of any medication – 8.5 percent of the time. A 20-mg dose of Levitra had the highest rate of side effects: 25 percent. Higher doses of Viagra and Cialis tended to cause side effects between 21 and 22 percent of the time.

“Viagra has an established efficacy and safety profile and remains an important treatment option for men with erectile dysfunction,” a spokesperson for Pfizer, makers of the drug, told Reuters Health in a statement. “Viagra has been studied for more than 15 years in more than 136 completed and ongoing clinical trials involving more than 23,000 men with ED.”

Side effects depend on which drug is used and what other enzymes the drug is able to inhibit, Pastuszak told Reuters Health by email. One of the main side effects of Viagra is visual changes, whereas Cialis more often causes muscle pain.

More generally, these types of ED drugs can cause a drop in blood pressure, because they are vasodilators, which open blood vessels, he said. He added that they should not be used with nitrate-based heart medications since they can cause a steep drop in blood pressure.

“Other common side effects include facial flushing, congestion, headache, and upset stomach,” Pastuszak said.

“Men complain of side effects, but more often of a lack of complete efficacy,” he said. “The drugs are not for everyone, as they won’t necessarily help a man with severe erectile dysfunction as much as they would someone with mild or moderate ED.”

Urologists will already have an understanding of the effectiveness and side effects of the available ED therapies, so the new results will not be a surprise, he said.

Only Cialis is to be taken daily, the other options are all short-acting, so men have the option of trying several to see which one works well, he said.

Doctors should carefully discuss expectations and treatment effects of the various options with patients before choosing a therapy, the authors write.

Some ED patients may want immediate stronger efficacy at the cost of higher side effects, while others may not.

Viagra Could Stop Malaria


Since it first came on the market in 1998, Viagra has been found to address more conditions than just erectile dysfunction—it treats hypertension, altitude sickness, and prostate cancer. Now a team of European researchers has found that everyone’s favorite little blue pill can prevent malaria because of the way an enzyme affects red blood cells, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens.

Malaria is caused by a parasite that lives in blood and is transmitted between people through mosquito bites. The sexual form of the parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, goes through some stages of its development in mosquitoes, but spends one very important stage in human red blood cells found in bone marrow. Once in the blood, these cells give the impression of being healthy because they are squishy, which allowed them to slip by the spleen, which normally looks for abnormal or dead blood cells, which are firmer, and filters them out.

The researchers figured that a good way to engage the spleen’s cleansing power would be to harden the red blood cells. Viagra, which works for its intended purpose by relaxing certain muscles to increase blood flow, allows the infected cells to remain stiff by inhibiting an enzyme that would keep them squishy. In this study, the researchers tested Viagra on the blood in an artificial spleen and found that the spleen easily weeded out the hardened red blood cells. The researchers see their work as the first step towards new types of antimalarials.

Pulmonary Hypertension & Viagra: Researchers Discover Novel Mechanisms of Sildenafil for Disease.


A group of researchers from the University of Pécs, Hungary, have attempted to understand the mechanism by which pulmonary vascular remodeling initiates right ventricular failure and hypoxia, one of the leading causes behind the mortality rates associated with Pulmonary Hypertension (PH).

viagra and PH

Sildenafil, known more commonly by its brand name Viagra, is an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5), an enzyme found in various tissues and involved in the cardiovascular system, and is frequently used in the treatment of PH, since it can improve exercise capacity, PH symptoms, and haemodynamics. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the protective effect exerted by this drug are not fully understood.

In this study, entitled “Novel Mechanisms of Sildenafil in Pulmonary Hypertension Involving Cytokines/Chemokines, MAP Kinases and Akt”, published in the PLOS ONE journal, the team used a monocrotaline (MCT, a toxic metabolite of plant origin)-induced rat PH model to analyze lung morphology, expression of cytokines, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI-3k-Akt) pathway and nuclear factor (NF)-kB activation, to understand the mechanisms by which sildenafil’s exerts its protective effects in PH.

The authors could observe that sildenafil not only protected lung morphology but it also suppressed several cytokines directly related with neutrophil and mononuclear cell recruitment, such as cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2a/b, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, interleukin (IL)-1a, lipopolysaccharide induced CXC chemokine (LIX), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1a, and MIP-3a.

All of these cytokines induced by MCT treatment are regulated by NF-kB, and as such, through immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies targeted at this nuclear factor, the authors discovered that MCT treatment caused a massive activation and nuclear translocation of NF-kB, a process significantly decreased upon sildenafil treatment.

Furthermore, sildenafil reduced the amount of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 MAPK activation, enhancing the activation of the cytoprotective Akt pathway in these PH mice.

Based on the results of this study, the authors concluded that, in mice, sildenafil is able to overcome the pathologic remodeling processes induced by MCT treatment, thus decreasing the infiltration of inflammatory cells and reducing edema formation.

Altogether, these data can reveal important clues regarding the novel mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of Viagra use in PH patients to reduce inflammation and swelling, moving one step closer to the development of improved therapies targeted at this progressive and incurable disease.

Viagra Frisky Might Be Melanoma Risky


Men who used the erectile-function drug sildenafil (Viagra) had almost twice the risk of melanoma compared with men who never used the drug, a study of 26,000 men showed.

Recent sildenafil use was associated with an 84% greater risk of melanoma. Use of the drug had no association with the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancers, according to Jiali Han, PhD, of the Indiana University School of Public Health in Indianapolis, and co-authors. Moreover, erectile function per se did not correlate with melanoma risk, they reported in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Our study cannot prove cause and effect,” the authors concluded. “A longer follow-up and more detailed assessment of the dose and frequency of sildenafil use at multiple times in the [study cohort] would be necessary for future studies.”

“Nevertheless, our data provide epidemiological evidence on possible skin adverse effects of PDE5A inhibitors [the sildenafil drug class] and support continued investigation of this relationship,” they added.

Though just an association — not proof of causality — the link between sildenafil and melanoma does have a potential molecular basis, said Ryan Sullivan, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“Sildenafil may promote tumor growth, at least in tumor cells,” Sullivan told MedPage Today. “There’s plausibility, but this not causation as of yet. There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done before we can definitively say that drugs for erectile dysfunction cause melanoma.”

If the association proves to be a real relationship, then the effect on melanoma risk probably applies to all drugs in the PDE5-inhibitor class, he added.

The underlying biologic mechanisms of melanoma involve multiple molecular entities within a complex signaling pathway. Mutations in BRAF occur in about half of all melanomas. Drugs that target BRAF have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of melanoma.

Recently, the enzyme phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) was reported to be a downstream target of BRAF, the authors noted. Activated BRAF downregulates PDE5A to facilitate invasion and metastasis of melanoma cells. Additionally, other molecules in the melanoma-associated signaling pathway, notably NRAS, have been shown to downregulate PDE5A in melanoma cell lines.

“This indicates that PDE5A suppression by sildenafil use mimics an effect of BRAF/NRAS activation and thus may potentially function as one of the ‘hits’ for melanomagenesis,” according to the authors’ background information.

Two PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to promote melanin synthesis, which may stimulate melanoma development, they continued. The body of evidence led Han and colleagues to hypothesize the existence of an association between sildenafil use and melanoma.

To test the hypothesis, investigators analyzed data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), which began in 1986 and has a total enrollment of 51,529 male health professionals ages 40 to 75. Each participant completed a health survey at baseline and then every 2 years.

In the 2000 follow-up survey, HPFS participants were asked whether they had undergone surgery or received other treatment for erectile dysfunction within the previous 3 months. With respect to sildenafil use, respondents were not asked to provide specific information about drug dosage or frequency of use.

The 2000 survey also included items related to erectile function before 1986, and from 1986 to 1986, 1990 to 1994, and 1995 to 2000, as well as during the past 3 months. Men who reported poor or very poor erectile function at or before 2000 were considered to have erectile dysfunction in 2000.

The HPFS questionnaires also included items related to risk factors for melanoma, such as hair color and skin type, number of lifetime sunburns, moles on the arms, state of residence at birth and at 15 and 30, and tendency to sunburn during adolescence.

Family history of melanoma was included in the 1990 and 1992 surveys. In 2008, the survey included items related to midday sun exposure at ages from high school to 60. Every biennial survey collected information about smoking, body mass index, and physical activity.

Men who completed the 2000 HPFS questionnaire provided the study population. Investigators excluded participants who had diagnoses of squamous-cell skin cancer, basal-cell skin cancer, or melanoma prior to 2000. Follow-up continued to the last completed questionnaire or the 2010 questionnaire, whichever came first.

The analysis included 25,848 men who had a mean baseline age of 64.8. The authors found that 5.3% of the men reported recent use of sildenafil, and 6.3% reported any use.

Sildenafil users tended to:

  • Be older and obese
  • Have a history of severe and blistering sunburns
  • Be more likely to undergo physical examinations
  • Be exposed to less sunlight as adults

From 2000 to 2010, 142 melanoma diagnoses were documented, as were 580 cases of squamous-cell skin cancer and 3,030 cases of basal-cell skin cancer.

In a multivariate analysis, men who reported current sildenafil use at baseline had a melanoma hazard ratio of 1.84 versus men who had never used the drug (95% CI 1.04-3.22). Men who reported any use of sildenafil had a similar melanoma risk (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.14-3.22).

In contrast, sildenafil use did not influence the risk of squamous-cell or basal-cell skin cancer.

The increased risk of melanoma persisted among sildenafil users after exclusion of patients who had major comorbidities at baseline, including in increased risk with recent use (HR 2.24, 95% CI 1.05-4.78) and any use (HR 2.77, 95% I 1.32-5.85).

Viagra Poses Skin Cancer Risk For Men, As Researchers Find Increased Melanoma Threat Among ED Drug Users


According to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers have identified a link between sildenafil (more commonly known as Viagra) and melanoma, or skin cancer. Not only is there an association between the two, but the authors of the study say the drug may increase a man’s risk for melanoma by up to 84 percent.

Viagra

Sildenafil is used to treat erectile dysfunction, or impotence — an inability to maintain an erection — and boosts blood flow. The authors of the study reviewed 26,000 men who were enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study at Harvard School of Public Health, which has been tracking men since 2000 about their sexual health, Viagra use, and sun exposure. They had also been tracking the men’s incidences of melanoma.

The researchers found that the men who were using Viagra had almost twice the risk of developing melanoma, but not for other types of skin cancers. However, they were unable to identify whether it was the drug itself or even erectile dysfunction that caused melanoma; there was only a correlation. Though Viagra has been linked to other minor side effects, like dizziness, headaches, and even heart problems, this is the first time it has been associated with a boost in skin cancer risk. “Although this study is insufficient to alter clinical recommendations,” the authors wrote in their conclusion, “we support a need for continued investigation of this association.”

Ironically, a previous study published a few years ago actually found opposite results: that Viagra could potentially prevent melanoma. Dr. Viktor Umansky of the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, found that Viagra appeared to neutralize tumors’ inflammatory immune responses in mice. However, linking mice results to humans is quite a leap, and further research would be needed before making such conclusions — on both ends. Regardless, “people who are on the medication and who have a high risk for developing melanoma may consider touching base with their primary care providers,” Dr. Abrar Qureshi, professor and chair of the dermatology department at Brown University, and a co-author of the newest study, said.

Pfizer has started selling Viagra online.


http://live.huffingtonpost.com/r/segment/pfizer-begins-selling-viagra-online-to-customers/5187d364fe3444063e0005e1

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