NASA Confirms: “Marijuana Contains “Alien DNA” From Outside Of Our Solar System”


It’s big news, set to shock, amaze, and entertain the world.

 But unfortunately, it’s got nothing to do with extraterrestrial stoners melding with Earth’s plants.

However, since you’re now reading, you’ll almost certainly be interested in this research that looked into the clicking and sharing behaviors of social media users reading content (or not) and then sharing it on social media.

We noticed long ago that many of our followers will happily like, share and offer an opinion on an article – all without ever reading it. We’re not the only ones to notice this. Last April, NPR shared an article on their Facebook page which asked “Why doesn’t America read anymore?”. The joke, of course, is that there was no article. They waited to see if their followers would weigh in with an opinion without clicking the link, and they weren’t disappointed.

We’ve been hoping for a chance to try it ourselves, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity. Yackler had some fun with the same article and managed to fool a bunch of people.

A group of computer scientists at Columbia University and the French National Institute looked into a dataset of over 2.8 million online news articles that were shared via Twitter. The study found that up to 59 percent of links shared on Twitter have never actually been clicked by that person’s followers, suggesting that social media users are more into sharing content than actually clicking on and reading it.

“People are more willing to share an article than read it,” the study’s co-author Arnaud Legout said in a statement, Washington Post reports. “This is typical of modern information consumption. People form an opinion based on a summary, or a summary of summaries, without making the effort to go deeper.”

This study looks into the psychology behind what makes people want to share content. Research conducted by The New York Times Customer Insight Grouplooked into what motivates people to share information. Just under half of the people asked in the survey said they share information on social media to inform people and to “enrich” those around them. Conversely, they found 68 percent share to reinforce and project a certain image of themselves – in a sense, to “define” themselves.

Advertisements

NASA Confirms: “Marijuana Contains “Alien DNA” From Outside Of Our Solar System”


It’s big news, set to shock, amaze, and entertain the world.

 But unfortunately, it’s got nothing to do with extraterrestrial stoners melding with Earth’s plants.

However, since you’re now reading, you’ll almost certainly be interested in this research that looked into the clicking and sharing behaviors of social media users reading content (or not) and then sharing it on social media.

We noticed long ago that many of our followers will happily like, share and offer an opinion on an article – all without ever reading it. We’re not the only ones to notice this. Last April, NPR shared an article on their Facebook page which asked “Why doesn’t America read anymore?”. The joke, of course, is that there was no article. They waited to see if their followers would weigh in with an opinion without clicking the link, and they weren’t disappointed.

We’ve been hoping for a chance to try it ourselves, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity. Yackler had some fun with the same article and managed to fool a bunch of people.

A group of computer scientists at Columbia University and the French National Institute looked into a dataset of over 2.8 million online news articles that were shared via Twitter. The study found that up to 59 percent of links shared on Twitter have never actually been clicked by that person’s followers, suggesting that social media users are more into sharing content than actually clicking on and reading it.

“People are more willing to share an article than read it,” the study’s co-author Arnaud Legout said in a statement, Washington Post reports. “This is typical of modern information consumption. People form an opinion based on a summary, or a summary of summaries, without making the effort to go deeper.”

This study looks into the psychology behind what makes people want to share content. Research conducted by The New York Times Customer Insight Grouplooked into what motivates people to share information. Just under half of the people asked in the survey said they share information on social media to inform people and to “enrich” those around them. Conversely, they found 68 percent share to reinforce and project a certain image of themselves – in a sense, to “define” themselves.

In the words of one participant from the study: “I try to share only information that will reinforce the image I’d like to present: thoughtful, reasoned, kind, interested and passionate about certain things.”

It also raises the question of whether online media is just a massive “echo chamber”, where we all just like pages and viewpoints that reinforce our own beliefs and are not interested in information for the sake of information. Even the algorithms of social media sites mean that individuals or pages that you tend to click on, like, or share – which are most often the articles or viewpoints that you agree with – will more frequently turn up on your News Feed.

As a user of online media, you’re probably quite aware of this.

Take a look at any comment on social media pages, including those, of course, on the IFLScience Facebook page. It’s particularly noticeable on the more “emotive” and controversial of subjects; think climate change, GMOs, vaccinations, aliens, and a lot of our articles on marijuana, where the top comments often repeat or question something that is fairly explicitly in the article, but not the headline.

Just this week, our article about capuchins monkeys entering the stone age was met with many of the top comments on the Facebook post pointing out they’ve done this for hundreds of years, despite that being the first thing the article said if you read it. Although from our analytics it’s impossible to see which users did not click through to the article yet shared it, there is fairly often a slightly fine discrepancy between shares and page views which doesn’t quite add up, especially on those buzz subjects.

So, if you are one of the lucky few who managed to click and read this article, we congratulate you! Although we do apologize for the misleading headline. In the meanwhile, have fun sharing the article and seeing who manages to chair a discussion on marijuana genetics, without ever reading it.

A Matrioshka Brain Is A Computer The Size Of A Solar System


Imagine a computer the size of a solar system. For power, it would use a Dyson sphere—a solar array that completely surrounds the host star to collect almost all of its energy. That energy-collecting sphere would double as an ultra-powerful computer processor. Once the sphere had collected all the energy it needed, it would pass the excess to another larger Dyson-sphere processor that completely surrounded the first, repeating the process until all of the energy was being used. That’s why this theoretical computer is called a Matrioshka brain: the nested Dyson spheres would resemble matryoshka dolls, or Russian nesting dolls.

Of course, if you surround your star with Dyson spheres, it would be difficult for life on your planet to continue. That’s kind of the point: this Matrioshka brain would be so powerful that a species could upload their entire consciousness into it and live within an alternate universe simulated by the computer. The species itself could die and its planet could be destroyed, but the civilization would live on in a digital world identical to the one it left behind. In fact, many people, including Elon Musk, believe we’re living in a simulation like that at this very moment. This provides one answer to the Fermi Paradox—that is, the question of why we haven’t encountered aliens despite the likelihood that they’re out there. It’s possible that any civilization advanced enough to find us has already decided to abandon reality entirely and upload themselves to a Matrioshka brain. Delve deeper into megastructures and theoretical tech with the videos below.

 How To Turn The Solar System Into A Computer

What’s a Matrioshka brain, and how would it work?

Watch the video. URL:

What Is A Dyson Sphere?

Find out whether this theoretical megastructure is even possible.

Watch the video. URL:

  1. In the future, we’ll build larger and larger solar arrays until we enclose the entire sun in a cloud of solar satellites. This “cloud” is known as a Dyson sphere.00:25
  2. In 1960, physicist Freeman Dyson theorized that if future civilization could enclose our star in a rigid shell, we could generate 384 yottawatts (384 x 10^24 watts) of energy.01:00
  3. There are many problems with the concept.

NASA Is Set to Announce a Breaking Discovery From “Beyond Our Solar System”


IN BRIEF
  • NASA will hold a press conference at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, February 22nd to present new findings on exoplanets, and the public will be able to ask questions via twitter.
  • Many are curious what this press conference will entail. Has evidence been uncovered of life beyond our planet?

AN EXO-CONFERENCE

NASA has served as a symbol of wonder and scientific enthusiasm. From landing on the moon to the exploration of our solar system, it has been the organization’s ultimate goal to make the unknown, known. As of this moment, one of the most pressing unknowns is the existence of extraterrestrial life.  Avoiding discussion without a fact base, NASA has already launched several evidence-based research projects on the matter. From establishing a martian colony to diving into the seas of Europa—NASA is at work trying to find answers.

NASA will be holding a press conference at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, February 22nd to present new findings on exoplanets, which are planets that orbit stars other than our sun.


Participants of the briefing include Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Michael Gillon, astronomer at the University of Liege in Belgium, Sean Carey, manager of NASA’s Spitzer Science Center at Caltech/IPAC, Nikole Lewis, astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and Sara Seager, professor of planetary science and physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

During the conference, NASA will be taking questions from the public and the media on twitter through the hashtag #askNASA. At 3 p.m. EST, following the briefing, NASA will host a Reddit AMA(Ask Me Anything) session with the scientists available to answer questions in English and Spanish.

The event can be streamed live on NASA TV at the time of the conference.

WHERE ARE WE NOW?

The first exoplanet around a main-sequence star to be discovered was in October of 1995,  and ever since, we have discovered 4,696 candidates, 3,449 confirmed exoplanets, and of these exoplanets, 348 have been terrestrial. Thanks to advanced technology, we continue to unravel more and more mysteries of the universe, and exoplanets are no exception.

Below you can find a commercially sponsored trailer for exoplanets created by NASA:

Evidence of huge ninth planet found in solar system.


Planet Nine is 10 times the mass of Earth and takes up to 20,000 years to orbit the Sun .

The body, which has been dubbed ‘Planet Nine’ is 10 times the mass of Earth and takes between 10,000 and 20,000 years to orbit the Sun. It is so big that researchers have branded it ‘the most planety planet of the solar system.’

 It was found by researchers at the California Institute of Technology who were puzzled as to why 13 objects in the Kuiper Belt – an area beyond Pluto – were all moving together as if being ‘lassooed’ by the gravity of a huge object.
“If it exists, it should be detectable. So we must wait until searches with big telescopes have been carried out.”
Prof Sir Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal

The Astronomer Royal Prof Sir Martin Rees said that telescopes should be able to see the planet.

“If it exists, it should be detectable,” said Prof Rees. “So we must wait until searches with big telescopes have been carried out.

“These are indirect arguments, but they should motivate a more intensive search for an inferred far-away planet.”

Researcher Dr Mike Brown who discovered evidence for the planet with Dr Konstantin Batygin said that it is so large that there should be no debate about whether it is a true planet.

Unlike the class of smaller objects now known as dwarf planets, Planet Nine gravitationally dominates its neighborhood of the solar system – one of the key tests for planet classification.

Pluto used to be regarded as the ninth planet but was downgraded in 2006 to a dwarf-planet or ‘plutoid’ and is now known unceremoniously as ‘asteroid number 134340.’

In fact, it dominates a region larger than any of the other known planets–a fact that Brown says makes it “the most planet-y of the planets in the whole solar system.”

“This would be a real ninth planet,” says Dr Brown, the Richard and Barbara Rosenberg Professor of Planetary Astronomy.

“There have only been two true planets discovered since ancient times, and this would be a third. It’s a pretty substantial chunk of our solar system that’s still out there to be found, which is pretty exciting.”

“Although we were initially quite skeptical that this planet could exist, as we continued to investigate its orbit and what it would mean for the outer solar system, we become increasingly convinced that it is out there,” added Dr Batygin, an assistant professor of planetary science.

“For the first time in over 150 years, there is solid evidence that the solar system’s planetary census is incomplete.”

Dr Robert Massey, of the Royal Astronomical Society, said the planet would be cold and dark.

“It’s a very long way away and our Sun would appear as a very bright start in the sky,” he said. “It would be like walking in bright moonlight if it had a surface where you could walk around and see the landscape.

“If it is out there we should now be able to point our telescopes to where it should be and see it. It’s far away but then it’s very big, and we can see objects which are closer but smaller.

“If it does turn out to exist it would expand our knowledge of the solar system and make us question whether there is anything even further out.”

Dr Brown and other colleagues have begun searching the skies for Planet Nine. Only the planet’s rough orbit is known, not the precise location of the planet on that elliptical path. If the planet happens to be close to its perihelion, Dr Brown says, astronomers should be able to spot it in images captured by previous surveys.

If it is in the most distant part of its orbit, the world’s largest telescopes — such as the twin 10-meter telescopes at the W. M. Keck Observatory and the Subaru Telescope, all on Maunakea in Hawaii — will be needed to see it. If, however, Planet Nine is now located anywhere in between, many telescopes have a shot at finding it.

“I would love to find it,” said Dr Brown. “But I’d also be perfectly happy if someone else found it. That is why we’re publishing this paper. We hope that other people are going to get inspired and start searching.”

The Caltech team reported their findings in the current issue of the Astronical Journal.

NASA Selects Two Missions to Explore the Early Solar System.


Artist’s conception of the Lucy and Psyche mission spacecraft

(Left) An artist’s conception of the Lucy spacecraft flying by the Trojan Eurybates – one of the six diverse and scientifically important Trojans to be studied. Trojans are fossils of planet formation and so will supply important clues to the earliest history of the solar system. (Right) Psyche, the first mission to the metal world 16 Psyche will map features, structure, composition, and magnetic field, and examine a landscape unlike anything explored before. Psyche will teach us about the hidden cores of the Earth, Mars, Mercury and Venus.
Credits: SwRI and SSL/Peter Rubin

NASA has selected two missions that have the potential to open new windows on one of the earliest eras in the history of our solar system – a time less than 10 million years after the birth of our sun. The missions, known as Lucy and Psyche, were chosen from five finalists and will proceed to mission formulation, with the goal of launching in 2021 and 2023, respectively.

“Lucy will visit a target-rich environment of Jupiter’s mysterious Trojan asteroids, while Psyche will study a unique metal asteroid that’s never been visited before,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “This is what Discovery Program missions are all about – boldly going to places we’ve never been to enable groundbreaking science.”

Lucy, a robotic spacecraft, is scheduled to launch in October 2021. It’s slated to arrive at its first destination, a main belt asteroid, in 2025. From 2027 to 2033, Lucy will explore six Jupiter Trojan asteroids. These asteroids are trapped by Jupiter’s gravity in two swarms that share the planet’s orbit, one leading and one trailing Jupiter in its 12-year circuit around the sun. The Trojans are thought to be relics of a much earlier era in the history of the solar system, and may have formed far beyond Jupiter’s current orbit.

“This is a unique opportunity,” said Harold F. Levison, principal investigator of the Lucy mission from the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. “Because the Trojans are remnants of the primordial material that formed the outer planets, they hold vital clues to deciphering the history of the solar system. Lucy, like the human fossil for which it is named, will revolutionize the understanding of our origins.”

Lucy will build on the success of NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, using newer versions of the RALPH and LORRI science instruments that helped enable the mission’s achievements. Several members of the Lucy mission team also are veterans of the New Horizons mission. Lucy also will build on the success of the OSIRIS-REx mission to asteroid Bennu, with the OTES instrument and several members of the OSIRIS-REx team.

The Psyche mission will explore one of the most intriguing targets in the main asteroid belt – a giant metal asteroid, known as 16 Psyche, about three times farther away from the sun than is the Earth. This asteroid measures about 130 miles (210 kilometers) in diameter and, unlike most other asteroids that are rocky or icy bodies, is thought to be comprised mostly of metallic iron and nickel, similar to Earth’s core. Scientists wonder whether Psyche could be an exposed core of an early planet that could have been as large as Mars, but which lost its rocky outer layers due to a number of violent collisions billions of years ago.

The mission will help scientists understand how planets and other bodies separated into their layers – including cores, mantles and crusts – early in their histories.

“This is an opportunity to explore a new type of world – not one of rock or ice, but of metal,” said Psyche Principal Investigator Lindy Elkins-Tanton of Arizona State University in Tempe. “16 Psyche is the only known object of its kind in the solar system, and this is the only way humans will ever visit a core. We learn about inner space by visiting outer space.”

Psyche, also a robotic mission, is targeted to launch in October of 2023, arriving at the asteroid in 2030, following an Earth gravity assist spacecraft maneuver in 2024 and a Mars flyby in 2025.

In addition to selecting the Lucy and Psyche missions for formulation, the agency will extend funding for the Near Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) project for an additional year. The NEOCam space telescope is designed to survey regions of space closest to Earth’s orbit, where potentially hazardous asteroids may be found.

“These are true missions of discovery that integrate into NASA’s larger strategy of investigating how the solar system formed and evolved,” said NASA’s Planetary Science Director Jim Green. “We’ve explored terrestrial planets, gas giants, and a range of other bodies orbiting the sun. Lucy will observe primitive remnants from farther out in the solar system, while Psyche will directly observe the interior of a planetary body. These additional pieces of the puzzle will help us understand how the sun and its family of planets formed, changed over time, and became places where life could develop and be sustained – and what the future may hold.”

Discovery Program class missions like these are relatively low-cost, their development capped at about $450 million. They are managed for NASA’s Planetary Science Division by the Planetary Missions Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The missions are designed and led by a principal investigator, who assembles a team of scientists and engineers, to address key science questions about the solar system.

The Discovery Program portfolio includes 12 prior selections such as the MESSENGER mission to study Mercury, the Dawn mission to explore asteroids Vesta and Ceres, and the InSight Mars lander, scheduled to launch in May 2018.

NASA’s other missions to asteroids began with the NEAR orbiter of asteroid Eros, which arrived in 2000, and continues with Dawn, which orbited Vesta and now is in an extended mission phase at Ceres. The OSIRIS-REx mission, which launched on Sept. 8, 2016, is speeding toward a 2018 rendezvous with the asteroid Bennu, and will deliver a sample back to Earth in 2023. Each mission focuses on a different aspect of asteroid science to give scientists the broader picture of solar system formation and evolution.

This Is How Soon You’d Die Around The Solar System


Earth is a beautiful place—and you’ll certainly appreciate it more when you look at how long you would survive unprotected around the Solar System. Hint: There’s nowhere besides Earth where you could survive any longer than two minutes. Mercury and Mars are the only places in the Solar System where you could survive as long as you could hold your breath. On the other planets and the sun, you would either instantly vaporize (on the sun and on Venus), or be crushed by the pressure of a gas planet.

Sounds lovely!

 

Did a Supernova Give Birth to Our Solar System?


 

A cloud of gas and dust began to collapse 4.6 billion years ago, triggering the formation of Earth’s sun and solar system. Pictured here: a much larger collection of gas and dust, spotted in the constellation Cygnus, which is about 4,500 light-years away.

The explosive death of a star — that may have been up to a dozen times the sun’s mass — might have triggered the formation of the solar system, a new study finds.

The sun as well as the rest of the solar system was born from a cloud of gas and dust about 4.6 billion years ago. According to previous research, some event disturbed this cloud, prompting a gravitational collapse that formed the sun and a surrounding disk of matter, where the planets were born.

By searching for telltale patterns that have been left in matter from the dawn of the solar system, Yong-Zhong Qian, co-author of the new study and an astrophysicist at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and his colleagues now suggest that the explosive death of a small star could have kicked off that collapse. [Our Solar System: A Photo Tour of the Planets]

Prior work has suggested that a supernova’s shock wave might have packed enough energy to compress the preexisting cloud of dust. And researchers have searched for evidence of that blast: Supernovas generate telltale patterns of unstable, short-lived radioactive isotopes. The discovery of the signatures of such anomalies in ancient rocks would help confirm the idea that a supernova triggered the solar system’s formation. (The isotopes of an element have different numbers of neutrons. A different number at the end of the isotope’s name identifies each variety: for example, beryllium-9 or beryllium-10.) Until now, researchers have failed to find the fingerprints of these isotopic anomalies in ancient meteorites that were left over from the birth of the solar system. However, researchers had been examining supernovas from relatively high-mass stars — those that are 15 or more times the sun’s mass, Qian told Space.com. Qian’s group chose to model lower-mass supernovasinstead, from stars that are 12 times the sun’s mass or less, and they investigated what isotopes would be formed from those explosions. They focused on the production of beryllium-10, an isotope that is commonly found in meteorites. Its prevalence in meteorites was already a mystery for researchers, Qian said. One theory held that high-energy cosmic rays could have stripped away protons or neutrons from atomic nuclei to create the beryllium-10 — a process called spallation.

Using new supernova models, Qian and his colleagues found that a low-mass supernova could generate vast amounts of ghostly particles known as neutrinos, whose influence on atomic nuclei could have created beryllium-10 — which would explain the high levels of that isotope in the meteorite record.

Moreover, the researchers said that the influence of a low-mass supernova might also explain the presence of other short-lived isotopes that are also found in meteorites, such as calcium-41 and palladium-107. “A low-mass supernova can explain the wide range of data that we have,” Qian told Space.com.

Qian noted that the study group’s findings do not explain the presence of all short-lived isotopes that are found in meteorites. “We think that some of these other short-lived nuclei might have been contributed by other mechanisms,” Qian said. “I don’t think that should be taken as a weakness of our model — it’s just that our model cannot explain everything. Our work is a major piece of the puzzle about the solar system’s formation, but there are other pieces of the puzzle that should be looked at as well.”

Ice On Comet Is As Old As The Solar System.


Which came first, the comet or the solar system? At least when it comes to the comet’s ice, the answer is that they both formed around the same time (around 4.6 billion years ago).

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

In a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters researchers announced that they had discovered that the ice on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko formed at the same time as the solar system itself. The comet is currently being observed by the Rosetta spacecraft

The ice on the comet’s surface is crystalline, meaning the water molecules are arranged in a neat orderly pattern within the ice. This kind of pattern occurs when water is allowed to cool relatively slowly, like in the cooling nebula of an early solar system. The experts believe this ice formed somewhere between -378.4 degrees Fahrenheit and -369.4 degrees Fahrenheit.

The researchers made this discovery not by analyzing the ice on a molecular level, but by looking at the chemicals trapped inside the ice on the comet’s surface. The ice contained only a tiny amount of Argon, a much smaller amount that would be expected if the ice was amorphous, or had a disordered structure of molecules. If the ice was amorphous that might have meant that the comet’s ice formed outside of the solar system, in interstellar space

Our Model Of The Solar System Has Been Wrong This Entire Time!


our-model-of-the-solar-system-has-been-wrong-this-entire-time9

If you walk into any classroom today, and likely ever since you were a kid yourself , there is one model being taught regarding the structure of our Solar System.  It’s the model that looks like this:

our-model-of-the-solar-system-has-been-wrong-this-entire-time2

It’s the traditional orbiting model of the Solar System, or the Heliocentric Model, where our planets rotate around the sun.

While this isn’t entirely wrong, it’s omitting one very important fact. The sun isn’t stationary. The sun is actually travelling at extremely fast speeds, upward of 828,000 km/hr, or 514,000 miles an hour.

Our whole Solar System is orbiting the Milky Way Galaxy. In fact it takes 220-Million Years for the Sun to orbit our Galaxy.

our-model-of-the-solar-system-has-been-wrong-this-entire-time3

Knowing this to be true, our visual model of the Solar System needs to change, and has been inaccurate this whole time. In fact, our planets are barreling through space with the sun, and literally creating a giant Cosmic DNA Helix, and a vortex similar to our Milky Way Galaxy.

Like this but in space, creating a never ending Sine Wave.

our-model-of-the-solar-system-has-been-wrong-this-entire-time4

This entails that our Sun & the Planets of our Solar System are never in the same place. When we make one rotation around the sun, we have already traveled millions of miles through space, meaning these Cosmic Cycles are far grander than we might have previously imagined.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/zBlAGGzup48

 

%d bloggers like this: