107 studies published in a cancer journal have just been retracted 


In a massive cleanup, 107 articles have just been retracted from the open-access cancer research journal Tumor Biology.

“After a thorough investigation we have strong reason to believe that the peer review process was compromised,” writes editor-in-chief Torgny Stigbrand in the retraction notice.

Peer review is one of the golden standards that help sort the wheat from pseudoscientific babbling, making the process an integral part of academic publishing.

But there is massive publishing pressure in the scientific community, and with about 2.5 million papers published each year, some of those inevitably end up cutting corners. In this case, the transgression was what’s known as ‘fake peer review’.

Scientists are often asked to provide recommendations for potential reviewers of their work. While that sounds like an obvious invitation to cheat, it actually makes sense when the work is really specific and few others do similar research.

But it’s easy to game the system by providing a fake reviewer email address, impersonating an actual researcher and sending the journal a super-positive review in their name.

“The articles were submitted with reviewer suggestions, which had real researcher names but fabricated email addresses,” Springer representative Peter Butler told Yan Jie at Sixth Tone.

It’s a pretty massive lot of retractions all at once, but a few of the big academic publishers have been sweeping their portfolios for potential breaches, including fake peer review, plagiarism, data fabrication and more.

This time, the 107 papers were published between 2012 and 2016, and most were authored by Chinese researchers, although that doesn’t automatically reflect poorly on their scientific work.

Chinese scientists are known to rely on third-party agencies that provide language editing services, which give the papers a polish, increasing the chance of getting accepted. But it’s possible those companies have also done the authors a massive disservice.

“There is some evidence that so-called third-party language-editing services play a role in manipulating the reviewing process,” an unnamed Springer spokesperson told Cathleen O’Grady at Ars Technica.

While we don’t have details on whether any of the authors had a hand in contributing fake reviews, experts are willing to chalk at least some of the breaches up to those third-party companies, some of which are known to operate unethically.

“If the authors didn’t realise that this is what the editing company was doing, then I feel the authors should have a fair chance,” Elizabeth Wager, editor of the journal Research Integrity & Peer Review, told Ars Technica.

“There’s probably nothing wrong with the research; it just hasn’t been peer reviewed.”

China is one of the biggest scientific contributors in the world, producing more than 300,000 papers every year. With strides in nuclear fusion and revolutionary CRISPR experiments, Chinese researchers are major players in the international research scene.

But any large industry gets its share of scandals. For example, just last year news broke that 80 percent of data in Chinese clinical trials had been fabricated.

As for Tumor Biology, the journal actually moved from Springer to SAGE late last year, and the new publisher was made aware of the investigation into potential peer review fraud. The journal is run by the International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers.

“The society were open about the past instances of peer review fraud, and as part of the relaunch they wanted to address the underlying reasons,” a SAGE spokesperson told Alison McCook at Retraction Watch.

“As part of their transition to a new publisher, the Tumor Biology editorial team have already introduced new robust peer review practices expected from all SAGE journals.”

8 Foods High in Magnesium: A Mineral for Diabetes, Insomnia and More .


Magnesium allows the body to absorb calcium, but it also carries out over 300 other functions in the body. This essential mineral makes sure that our nerves can communicate properly, our body maintains a regulated temperature (homeostasis) and can carry out important tasks like detoxification, supplying us with energy, and yes, making healthy teeth and bones. Everyone should know of foods high in magnesium as well as magnesium deficiency symptoms given the importance of this mineral, 

Magnesium is not only helpful in maintaining bone strength as we age, it can also improve the symptoms of PMS (premenstrual syndrome) as well as menopause for women. Magnesium even helps the body utilize vitamin B6 and reduces migraines, lowers high blood pressure, gets rid of constipation and can even help to remove gallstones.

Wondering – how do I get enough magnesium? There are many foods that will supply magnesium to your body in its most natural form. After checking to see if you have these magnesium deficiency symptoms, come back here to view this list of 8 foods high in magnesium.

magnesium foods 263x164 8 Foods High in Magnesium: A Mineral for Diabetes, Insomnia and More

8 Foods High in Magnesium

  • 1. Rice Bran – This food is hard to find since it often isn’t stocked at regular grocery stores, but rice bran is worth hunting down. In just 100 grams of this healthy food you can find 781 mg of magnesium – almost twice the recommended RDA.
  • 2. Dried Herbs Coriander, Sage, or Basil – In terms of density, these great herbs not only supply the body with lots of micronutrients and other trace minerals, they are loaded with magnesium. You can find around 690 mg per tablespoon. Add these spices and herbs to your favorite dishes to make them magnesium-magic.
  • 3. Dark Chocolate – Want a reason to indulge in one of your favorite foods? Real, dark chocolate, or cacao is full of antioxidants and loads of magnesium. Just 100 grams of dark chocolate offers about 230 mg of magnesium. Check out 7 other dark chocolate health benefits here.
  • 4. Dark Leafy Greens – Kale, spinach, collard greens, Swiss chard, and any dark leafy vegetables, including beet greens and dandelion greens will supply high levels of magnesium. 1 cup of cooked spinach, for example will contain 157 mg.
  • 5. Whole Grains – Brown rice, quinoa, bulgar, barley, whole oats, and non-GMO wheat will contain high levels of magnesium. I cup of cooked brown rice, for example, contains around 86 mg.
  • 6. Beans and Lentils – Although there is a lot of concern about xeno-estrogens in GMO soy, non-GMO soy, chickpeas, lentils, kidney beans and other types of beans are a great source of magnesium. Some beans provide up to 150 mg per one cup serving.
  • 7. Avocados – Not only is this food full of healthy fats, it is also a great source of magnesium. Just one avocado of a decent size will provide more than 60 mg of magnesium.
  • 8. Dairy – You have to be careful with some yogurts and cheeses because food manufacturers like to load them with hormones and sugars, but plain, unsweetened yogurts, and unpasteurized cheeses will provide loads of magnesium without polluting your body with traditional dairy.

Of course there are other foods high in magnesium, but this list should be enough to get you started.

Carnosol: A promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent


The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicinal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent.

source: cancer latter