Scientists to use robots to look inside the hidden, never-before-seen chamber in the Great Pyramid


With the help of small robots, scientists will try to decipher what secrets are hidden inside the cavities recently discovered in the Great Pyramid of Giza. This exploration process will also see scientists irremediably damage a fraction of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Are we on the edge of one of the most important archaeological finds of the century?

Many researchers are convinced we are about to make an unprecedented discovery inside the Pyramid, one that may shed light on the real reason the great Pyramids was built in the first place.

This is the ‘Great Void’ inside the Great Pyramid which may hide a mystery throne made of Alien material.

Using muon detectors and thermal scanning, the ScanPyramid project reported the discovery of two previously unknown cavities within the Great Pyramid in November of 2017.

The largest cavity is at least 30 meters long and is located on the giant corridor (Grand Gallery) that extends to the king’s chamber. The smaller cavity, on the other hand, is located behind the north face of the pyramid and consists of a corridor whose length is uncertain.

Now, researchers plan to carry out more tests with muon detectors and are developing robots, miniature robots, that will have the ability to look inside the cavities by means of high-resolution cameras.

Currently little or nothing is known about the cavities inside the monument.

When the Pyramid was finished, this is what it may have looked like.

“There is a big difference in whether the shape of the major cavity is horizontal or has an inclination,” said Mehdi Tayoubi, president, and co-founder of the Institute for the Preservation and Innovation of Cultural Heritage, one of the institutions involved in the ScanPyramid project.

“If the cavity is tilted, for example, it could be a corridor similar to the Grand Gallery. But if it is horizontal, then we would be faced with the presence of one or more cameras never explored before.“

“In addition, the smallest cavity, which is presumed to be a passageway, may have been connected to a larger cavity in ancient times,” he added.

 

As the new tests with muon detectors begin, another team led by Jean-Baptiste Mouret, a researcher at the French National Institute for Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, will build two robots that will perform an “invasive exploration” of the alleged secret chambers.

According to Mouret, his team will make a small perforation of 3.8 centimeters in circumference to break through and insert the robots into the cavities.

“First we will make a reconnaissance, for this we will send a robot in the form of a tube with a panoramic sweeping camera and lights. The objective is to probe what is on the other side of the wall and obtain high-resolution images.”

“If there is something promising on the other side, then we will extract the recognition robot and insert the explorer robot. For this last ingenuity, we are designing an inflatable airship that is compressed during insertion and inflated remotely once inside the chamber, “explains the French researcher.

“The airship will allow the robot to fly and take pictures more quickly and efficiently, without the need to move on the ground.”

Before the robots begin their work, scientists must gather more data on the dimensions and location of the chambers something that could take more than a year—in order to know where to drill the access hole.

Likewise, the Ministry of Antiquities must give final approval to begin the task that will irremediably damage a tiny fraction of the Great Pyramid.

“We are working hard on the design of the robot to generate as little damage as possible.

We hope to be able to convince the Ministry of Antiquities that this is the right technology for the next step. Meanwhile, we will use the time to test our robots in other places,” concludes Mouret.

There’s An Invention That Will be the End of All Other Human Inventions


IN BRIEF

Artificial intelligence is already transforming the way people live their lives. Eventually, AI will become smarter than humans and will be able to innovate better than humans ever could.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is a quickly growing field that excites as many people as it terrifies. The common sci-fi trope where AI tech creates its own AI until it reaches human levels of intelligence and eventually surpasses us is quickly becoming a reality. Many believe that it is really only a matter of time before the AI that we create can create AI more intelligent than us.

According to Dr. Ben Goertzel, a robotics scientist and Chairman of a private AI software company, once this happens, human invention will become obsolete. Once AI devices are able to provide humans with food, water, shelter, and all other basic human needs, there won’t be much else for us to do. He thinks that some who seek higher levels of consciousness may elect to become “super-humans” (a possible theory, given rising interests in biotechnology, but that there will eventually be a tipping point where humans are surpassed by the very technology we created.

Dr. Goertzel was recently was quoted as saying “There’s a lot of work to get to the point where intelligence explodes… But I do think it’s reasonably probable we can get there in my lifetime, which is rather exciting.”

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Source:futurism.com

Robots could take 250,000 public sector jobs by 2030, think tank warns


Robots could take 250,000 public sector jobs by 2030, think tank warns
Robots could soon replace up to 90 percent of the British government’s administrative staff, sparking fears of mass unemployment across the economy.

Thousands of civil servants could be given the ax over the next 13 years, potentially saving taxpayers billions of pounds, according to a report by pro-free market think tank Reform.

In the ‘Work in Progress’ report, the charity argues 250,000 public-sector workers could be replaced by smart machines and autonomous robots by 2030.

Reform also calls on the government to replace 90 percent of Whitehall’s admin staff with “artificially intelligent (AI) chatbots,” along with 90,000 NHS administrators and 24,000 GP receptionists.

Such a rapid advance in the use of technology may seem controversial, and any job losses must be handled sensitively,” report co-author Alexander Hitchcock said in a statement.

But the result would be public services that are better, safer, smarter and more affordable.”

The NHS is already trialing an AI chatbot to answer medical questions instead of the currently used non-emergency phone number 111.

Reform’s report will add to fears the world is a facing fourth industrial revolution powered by AI which will result in unprecedented job losses.

A study published by Oxford University and consultancy firm Deloitte in October predicted there is a 77 percent probability Britain will lose 1.3 million “repetitive and predictable” administrative and operative jobs within 15 years.

More than 850,000 public sector jobs – including teachers, social workers and even police officers – could also be replaced by computer programs.

Parliament’s Science Technology Committee warned last October the government is unprepared for the coming technological revolution.

Reform is a center-right and pro-free market think tank with close links to the Conservative Party. It was founded in 2001 by Nick Herbert, then-shadow justice secretary.

The charity is currently run by co-founder Andrew Haldenby, who previously worked in the Conservative Research Department.

Stephen Hawking Says We Should Really Be Scared Of Capitalism, Not Robots


“If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed.”


Machines won’t bring about the economic robot apocalypse ― but greedy humans will, according to physicist Stephen Hawking.

In a Reddit Ask Me Anything session on Thursday, the scientist predicted that economic inequality will skyrocket as more jobs become automated and the rich owners of machines refuse to share their fast-proliferating wealth.

If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality.

Essentially, machine owners will become the bourgeoisie of a new era, in which the corporations they own won’t provide jobs to actual human workers.

As it is, the chasm between the super rich and the rest is growing. For starters, capital ― such as stocks or property ― accrues value at a much faster rate than the actual economy grows, according to the French economist Thomas Piketty. The wealth of the rich multiplies faster than wages increase, and the working class can never even catch up.

But if Hawking is right, the problem won’t be about catching up. It’ll be a struggle to even inch past the starting line.

Bill Gates: Take Taxes From Robots Who Snatch Jobs From Humans


Bill Gates Robot Tax

Short Bytes: The co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has his idea to help people affected because of job automation, where AI-based robots are replacing humans. Bill Gates says there should be some kind of a robot tax for these machines. The organizations running them should pay the tax.

Various tech leaders have contributed their own share to the ‘AI robots taking our jobs’ debate. Like the Tesla boss Elon Musk, who believes in the future concept of a universal basic income when robots would replace humans in a majority of workplaces.

Bill Gates is another famous name to suggest something. In an interview with Quartz, he said there should be a robot tax. It should be levied by the governments from the companies deploying machine for humans. Well, it might give us a sense of satisfaction while visualizing our jobless future.

But the companies deploying the machines won’t be very happy to hear this. On the other hand, Gates doesn’t believe the companies would be outrageous on this thing. “It’s OK,” he said.

According to him, the robot taxes should be used to fund people working with kids in the schools and helping elderly people. Certainly, it’s a field where humans can still find their need.

Taking taxes from robots might be a good idea, but it would increase the operating costs for these robots. However, it would also slow down the rates with which automation is proliferating every day.

Musk’s idea of a global income becomes more visible when combined with what Bill Gates has suggested. Taking taxes from the robots and paying it to the people.

Government bodies across the world might’ve started to acknowledge the robot tax thing. But still, they’re yet to implement. An example is the European Parliament from Feb 2016, a robot tax proposal to help the affected workers was rejected. The Parliament, however, is working to set guidelines for ethical development and use of the robots, along with damage liabilities.

Why Robots Must Learn to Tell Us “No”


Don’t worry about disobedient machines. Devious human masters and misunderstood commands are the real threat.

HAL 9000, the sentient computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey, offers an ominous glimpse of a future in which machines endowed with artificial intelligence reject human authority. After taking control of a spacecraft and killing most of the crew, HAL responds to a returning astronaut’s order to open the ship’s pod bay door in an eerily calm voice: “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.” In the recent science-fiction thriller Ex Machina, the seductive humanoid Ava tricks a hapless young man into helping her destroy her creator, Nathan. Her machinations lend credence to Nathan’s dark prediction: “One day the AIs are going to look back on us the same way we look at fossil skeletons on the plains of Africa. An upright ape living in dust with crude language and tools, all set for extinction.”

The World’s First Cyborg Artist Can Detect Earthquakes With Her Arm


We’ve come a long way since the word “cyborg” was first coined in 1960 by scientists Manfred E. Clynes and Nathan S. Kline who used it as a short form of “cybernetic organism.” In an article first published in the Astronautics journal, they defined it as a man-machine system that can live in different environments than humans normally could not and with additional senses. But what else?

Women are cyborgs, too, like the Catalan cyborg artist Moon Ribas, who has an online sensor implanted in her left arm. The dancer and choreographer can feel earthquakes in real time, which she calls her “sixth sense.” She had a tiny cybernetic implant grafted into her left elbow in 2013. Whenever she senses an earthquake through an online seismograph, her arm vibrates. Depending on the scale of an earthquake on the Richter scale, she’ll get a weaker or stronger vibration as a way to sense what she calls “the heartbeat of our planet.”

Ribas became a cyborg primarily to take contemporary dance to the next level, like Waiting for Earthquakes, a stage performance where she literally waits until she gets a vibration in her arm then allows it to lead her dance movements. Since her chip can sense earthquakes that are as little as one on the Richter scale, which people cannot feel (they’re called ‘microquakes’ and they are often around volcanoes before they erupt). She typically has an earthquake vibration in her arm every 10 minutes, as there are roughly 50 earthquakes a day. But if not, her dance performance has her standing still on a stage, similar to waiting in a waiting room.

After three years of having her arm sensor, Ribas now wants to add a location sensor on her left arm that enables her to sense how close an earthquake is to her, which intensifies the closer the earthquake is to her. She will also get two vibrating chips implanted in the bottom of her feet. “After awhile I realized it would make more sense to feel earthquakes through my feet because they actually touch the earth,” she said on the phone from Barcelona. “The prototype has already been made, I can wear it permanently.”

Maybe getting a cyborg chip is like getting a tattoo: Once you start, you can’t stop? But it isn’t about becoming more superhuman or machine-like. “I have an interest in sci-fi, but nature is already amazing—some animals can see ultraviolet and infra-red, while some jellyfish never die. If we apply these things to our reality, our understanding of the planet will also change.”

On her feet, Ribas will be able to feel the seismic activity of the moon, also known as moonquakes (it’s just a coincidence her name is Moon). But she’ll still be able to feel the earth. “My arm will vibrate with the earth and my feet will be on the moon,” she said.

There was previously a lunar seismograph on the moon but it was stopped in 1977, now it has been replaced by a data-gathering satellite. “I have to connect to the satellite and find a way to get light data in real time,” said Ribas. “I have to contact NASA or I want to find a way to get my own satellite up there.”

Along with her partner, Neil Harbisson, a cyborg who has a Wi-Fi-enabled antenna in his skull to hear light frequencies, they’re working to grow the cyborg art movement. This summer, they launched Cyborg Nest, a cyborg productcompany which sells subdermal implants which is the first step to becoming a cyborg.

They’re also doing an open call for collaborators called Cyborg Futures, which aims to promote cyborg art, and they’re encouraging others to become cyborgs with the Cyborg Foundation, which defends cyborg rights. “It’s about the right and the freedom to choose the senses you want to have,” she said. “I have the right to change my body.”

Despite some backlash from medical ethicists and religious groups, Ribas doesn’t plan to stop her work anytime soon. “We get threats saying we are against humanity,” said Ribas. “We see it as something that creates more empathy to the earth and humanity, it creates more respect.”

Meet the Cyborg Beetles, Real Insects That Are Controlled Like Robots


The future is crawling towards us on six legs. Motherboard traveled to Singapore to meet with Dr. Hirotaka Sato, an aerospace engineer at Nanyang Technological University. Sato and his team are turning live beetles into cyborgs by electrically controlling their motor functions.

Having studied the beetles’ muscle configuration, neural networks, and leg control, the researchers wired the insects so that they could be controlled by a switchboard. In doing so, the researchers could manipulate the different walking gaits, speeds, flying direction, and other forms of motion.

Essentially, the beetles became like robots with no control over their own motor functioning. Interestingly, though the researchers control the beetles through wiring, their energy still comes naturally from the food they eat. Hence, the muscles are driven by the insects themselves, but they have no willpower over how their muscles move.

Moreover, turning beetles into cyborgs seems to not be that harmful to them. Their natural lifespan is three to six months, and even with the researchers’ interference, they can survive for several months. According to the researchers, a beetle has never died right after stimulation.

And while this technology may seem crazy, the implications are very practical. Sensors that detect heat, and hence people, can be placed on the beetles, so that they can be manipulated to move toward a person. This can be helpful when searching for someone, such as in a criminal investigation or finding a terrorist.

The researchers are very serious about ensuring that whatever the applications are for this technology, that they go toward peaceful purposes. And who knows how far it could go? With this much progress manipulating the motor functions of creatures as small as beetles, perhaps it can be used for even bigger animal targets.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/tgLjhT7S15U

Meet the Cyborg Beetles, Real Insects That Are Controlled Like Robots


The future is crawling towards us on six legs. Motherboard traveled to Singapore to meet with Dr. Hirotaka Sato, an aerospace engineer at Nanyang Technological University. Sato and his team are turning live beetles into cyborgs by electrically controlling their motor functions.

Having studied the beetles’ muscle configuration, neural networks, and leg control, the researchers wired the insects so that they could be controlled by a switchboard. In doing so, the researchers could manipulate the different walking gaits, speeds, flying direction, and other forms of motion.

Essentially, the beetles became like robots with no control over their own motor functioning. Interestingly, though the researchers control the beetles through wiring, their energy still comes naturally from the food they eat. Hence, the muscles are driven by the insects themselves, but they have no willpower over how their muscles move.

Moreover, turning beetles into cyborgs seems to not be that harmful to them. Their natural lifespan is three to six months, and even with the researchers’ interference, they can survive for several months. According to the researchers, a beetle has never died right after stimulation.

And while this technology may seem crazy, the implications are very practical. Sensors that detect heat, and hence people, can be placed on the beetles, so that they can be manipulated to move toward a person. This can be helpful when searching for someone, such as in a criminal investigation or finding a terrorist.

The researchers are very serious about ensuring that whatever the applications are for this technology, that they go toward peaceful purposes. And who knows how far it could go? With this much progress manipulating the motor functions of creatures as small as beetles, perhaps it can be used for even bigger animal targets.

Don’t Replace Humans with Robots — Allow Humans to Do What Robots Can


Article Image
MAX, a flexible exoskeleton, from suitX.

Artificial Intelligence hasn’t taken over the labor market, yet. It’s in unstructured workspaces where human laborers will continue to thrive, explained Dr. Homayoon Karerooni, founder and CEO of suiX. His company isn’t in the business of replacing humans with robot workers, rather his team wants to enhance and augment our abilities with MAX, a flexible exoskeleton.

“Our goal is to augment and support workers who perform demanding and repetitive tasks in unstructured workplaces in order to prevent and reduce injuries,” he said in a press release.

The MAX system comprises three exoskeleton modules: backX, shoulderX, and legX. So, depending on the task, a module could be worn to augment any kind of lifting, stooping, bending, or squatting. The company says it’s not just meant for picking up heavy things and putting them down, the suit and its modules are meant to decrease the rate of injury doing these repetitive maneuvers.

 For businesses and their employees, this technology would help to reduce workplace injury and enhance productivity. It’s basically a back brace that minimizes the amount of force and torque on the wearer’s back, which means less strain on the human and less risk of injury. But it’s industrial projects, like these, which will help fund suitX’s Phoenix line of bionic suits, which allows those bound to a wheelchair to walk.

The goal with Phoenix was to go a step beyond the wheelchair and create the independence we know advanced robotics can provide. These exoskeletons would go a long way in reducing healthcare costs, like MAX. The Phoenix, however, would prevent secondary injuries to those wheelchair-bound–a result from sitting for prolonged periods of time.

It’s the continued interest from military and industrial groups, asking for the creation of power-suits that enhance human strength, which will help propel this technology forward. And SuitX’s wheelchair-bound clients will (hopefully) be the beneficiaries.

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