7 Famous Brands That Use Child Slaves To Make Your Chocolate – Stop Supporting Them NOW! 


It’s very shocking to report that there is child slave labor going on in Africa, and the ages range from 5-15 years old.

 
They work from six in the morning until evening in West African cocoa farms. What’s even more controversial, is these farms are directly tied with popular chocolate makers like Hershey, Nestlé, Kraft, ADM Cocoa, Mars, Fowler’s Chocolate, and Godiva. These child slave labor-enabling chocolate manufacturers are the ones who make your Kit Kat, Reese’s, Milky Way, Butterfinger and M&M’s. 

There were three class action lawsuits, in California that accused Nestlé, Mars and Hershey of ignoring the fact that there is human rights violations happening in their cocoa suppliers, while knowing it is going on. While this ensues, they are projecting themselves as human rights-friendly.
Then, Cargill, ADM and Nestlé are in separate lawsuits with three former child slaves from Mali in 2005. They accused the companies of helping and enabling the slavery of children in the cocoa market within Côte d’Ivoire.

In 2000, the documentary “Slavery: A Global Investigation” exploits how deep and expanded, the chocolate industry’s ties are with cocoa farms that utilize child slaves for labor. The guardian of 19 children who were former slaves, told the makers how the children worked from dawn until dusk each day, locked within a shed at night like dogs. In order to go to the bathroom, they were given a tin cup. They had been stripped naked, tied up and routinely beaten.

They also spoke about how thousands of children were being purchased from their parents. Most of the kids are from countries like Mali, Togo, and Burkina Faso, for money, or kidnapped. Then they are shipped to Ivory Coast like cattle, where they are enslaved on cocoa farms for mass profit.

Here are 7 brands that allow child slavery and enjoy the benefits of the hardwork children put into making your beloved chocolate:
Nestlé 

Even though it says in their code of conduct that child labor is not used in it suppliers, researchers from the Fair Labor Association found evidence that contradicts their policy. In the evidence, it was found that forced labor occurred, and for 14 hours they worked in dangerous conditions.

They would perform tasks that were hazardous to their health such as utilizing machetes and carrying/transporting heavy loads. A spokesperson for the Nestlé corporation spoke with The guardian: “To date we have identified 3,933 children working on their family farms (around 10% of the children surveyed) who were involved in hazardous tasks classified as child labor.

We have included half of them in our Child Labour Monitoring and Remediation System, which includes providing school kits, obtaining birth certificates and developing income generating activities for the families of 312 identified children. Unfortunately, the scale and complexity of the issue is such that no company sourcing cocoa from Ivory Coast can guarantee that it has completely removed the risk of child labor from its supply chain.”

Nestlé made $91.6 billion in chocolate sales in 2014.
Hershey
Hershey is the largest maker of chocolate in the United States, and gets their supply from the Ivory Coast, where child labor, child slavery, and forced slavery. A pension fund from Louisiana had brought up questions on whether the executives of Hershey’s knowledge of how much of their cocoa supply comes from West Africa, and if it could have been produced by child slaves. Jeff Beckman, head of corporate communications, said to confectionerynews.com:
The allegations in the lawsuit are not new and reflect long-term challenges in cocoa-growing countries that many stakeholders, including NGOs, companies in the cocoa supply chain and the US Government have been working diligently together to address for many years.”
Hershey brought in $847 million in total income for the 2014 fiscal year.
Mars
Mars has openly stated that it would pledge to sourcing only certified cocoa by 2020. When questioned on their commitment to taking until 2020 to accomplish making their chocolate child labor-free, the company stated that “a very small number of children is trafficked or forced to work on cocoa farms”, that “reaching every one of the millions of cocoa farmers in West Africa is a difficult task”, and that pursuing non-child slave chocolate is “complex.” they believe “ten years is a realistic time frame” to maintain sustainability.

In 2001, the cocoa industry signed an agreement to stop and self-regulate child slavery by 2005. Then the deadline was delayed until 2008, then to 2010. It’s 2017, and we STILL have these giant cocoa manufacturers profiting off of child labor.

In a report done in 2015, it was reported that the number of children enslaved had increased 51 percent from 2009 to 2014. 1.4 million children are currently enslaved, and that’s the result of a 10 percent rise, from 1.1 million children since 2009, that are living in slave-like conditions.

ADM, Kraft, Godiva, And Fowler’s Chocolate

In 2005, three Malian citizens who had been forced into working on cocoa plantations in the Ivory Coast, filed a class-action lawsuit in a federal court in California, claiming ADM, Cargill (in 2015 Cargill acquired ADM’s global chocolate business for an enterprise value of $440 million) and Nestlé — through buying massive amounts of cocoa harvested by child slaves — “aided and abetted” child labor, slavery and torture.

As the lawsuit against ADM continues, one of the world’s largest producers of cocoa liquor, powder and butter, sold away its cocoa business for $1.3 billion in August 2015. Olam International Ltd, a Singapore-based agribusiness company bought the company.

 In 2012, Cadbury and Kraft Foods owner Mondelez International pledged $400 million to improve the lives of cocoa farmers and create a balanced and fair, cocoa economy. All the efforts from the company have been a constant failure, as it has been struggling for so many years to phase out forced labor from its top supplier chain.

West Africa is the main source for about 60% of the world’s cocoa, and Godiva. Godiva is the only chocolate maker that has abstained from making commitments to phasing out child labor from its supply chain. Even though it has been announced that Godiva would move to purchasing cocoa from child labor-free plantations by 2020, they have been very ambiguous in what motives and steps they are pursuing to roll out safe working environments, equal pay, and no forced labor of children.

Fowler’s chocolate has consistently spoke out about the slavery of children, yet, they still purchase their cocoa from suppliers in the Ivory Coast that have no guarantee of openly admitting they enforce child labor.

The BBC opened an investigation in 2010 to investigate the suppliers that sell chocolate to the UK. They found evidence of human trafficking, child slavery and labor. It was found that even with safeguards, there is no certainty that any chocolate has been made from child slaves. Chocolate thats sold as a Fairtrade product, are misleading as it isn’t sure if child slavery is enforced within their chain of supply.

Source:organicandhealthy.org
              anonews.co

Nestle Continues Stealing World’s Water During Drought


Nestlé is draining California aquifers, from Sacramento alone taking 80 million gallons annually. Nestlé then sells the people’s water back to them at great profit under many dozen brand names.

The city of Sacramento is in the fourth year of a record drought – yet the Nestlé Corporation continues to bottle city water to sell back to the public at a big profit, local activists charge.

The Nestlé Water Bottling Plant in Sacramento is the target of a major press conference on Tuesday, March 17, by a water coalition that claims the company is draining up to 80 million gallons of water a year from Sacramento aquifers during the drought.

The coalition, the crunchnestle alliance, says that City Hall has made this use of the water supply possible through a “corporate welfare giveaway,” according to a press advisory.

A coalition of environmentalists, Native Americans and other concerned people announced the press conference will take place at March 17 at 5 p.m. at new Sacramento City Hall, 915 I Street, Sacramento.

The coalition will release details of a protest on Friday, March 20, at the South Sacramento Nestlé plant designed to “shut down” the facility. The coalition is calling on Nestlé to pay rates commensurate with their enormous profit, or voluntarily close down.

“The coalition is protesting Nestlé’s virtually unlimited use of water – up to 80 million gallons a year drawn from local aquifers – while Sacramentans (like other Californians) who use a mere 7 to 10 percent of total water used in the State of California, have had severe restrictions and limitations forced upon them,” according to the coalition.

“Nestlé pays only 65 cents for each 470 gallons it pumps out of the ground – the same rate as an average residential water user. But the company can turn the area’s water around, and sell it back to Sacramento at mammoth profits,” the coalition said.

Activists say that Sacramento officials have refused attempts to obtain details of Nestlé’s water used. Coalition members have addressed the Sacramento City Council and requested that Nestle’ either pay a commercial rate under a two tier level, or pay a tax on their profit.

Warming Drought

In October, the coalition released a “White Paper” highlighting predatory water profiteering actions taken by Nestle’ Water Bottling Company in various cities, counties, states and countries. Most of those great “deals” yielded mega profits for Nestle’ at the expense of citizens and taxpayers. Additionally, the environmental impact on many of those areas yielded disastrous results.

Coalition spokesperson Andy Conn said, “This corporate welfare giveaway is an outrage and warrants a major investigation. For more than five months we have requested data on Nestlé water use. City Hall has not complied with our request, or given any indication that it will. Sacramentans deserve to know how their money is being spent and what they’re getting for it. In this case, they’re getting ripped off.”

For more information about the crunchnestle alliance, contact Andy Conn (530) 906-8077 camphgr55 (at) gmail.com or Bob Saunders (916) 370-8251

Nestlé is currently the leading supplier of the world’s bottled water, including such brands as Perrier and San Pellegrino, and has been criticized by activists for human rights violations throughout the world. For example, Food and Water Watch and other organizations blasted Nestlé’s “Human Rights Impact Assessment” in December 2013 as a “public relations stunt.”

“In November 2013, Colombian trade unionist Oscar Lopez Trivino became the fifteenth Nestlé worker to be assassinated by a paramilitary organization while many of his fellow workers were in the midst of a hunger strike protesting the corporation’s refusal to hear their grievances,” according to the groups.

The press conference and protest will take place just days after Jay Famiglietti, the senior water scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech and a professor of Earth system science at UC Irvine, revealed in an op-ed in the LA Times on March 12 that California has only one year of water supply left in its reservoirs.

“As difficult as it may be to face, the simple fact is that California is running out of water — and the problem started before our current drought. NASA data reveal that total water storage in California has been in steady decline since at least 2002, when satellite-based monitoring began, although groundwater depletion has been going on since the early 20th century.

Right now the state has only about one year of water supply left in its reservoirs, and our strategic backup supply, groundwater, is rapidly disappearing. California has no contingency plan for a persistent drought like this one (let alone a 20-plus-year mega-drought), except, apparently, staying in emergency mode and praying for rain.”

Meanwhile, Governor Jerry Brown continues to fast-track his Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) to build the peripheral tunnels to ship Sacramento River water to corporate agribusiness, Southern California water agencies, and oil companies conducting fracking operations. The $67 billion plan won’t create one single drop of new water, but it will take vast tracts of Delta farm land out of production under the guise of “habitat restoration” in order to irrigate drainage-impaired soil owned by corporate mega-growers on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley.

The tunnel plan will also hasten the extinction of Sacramento River Chinook salmon, Central Valley steelhead, Delta and longfin smelt, green sturgeon and other fish species, as well as imperil the salmon and steelhead populations on the Klamath and Trinity rivers. The peripheral tunnels will be good for agribusiness, water privateers, oil companies and the 1 percent, but will be bad for the fish, wildlife, people and environment of California and the public trust.

The Delta smelt may already be extinct in the wild!

In fact, the endangered Delta smelt, once the most abundant fish in the entire Bay Delta Estuary, may already be extinct, according to UC Davis fish biologist and author Peter Moyle, as quoted on Capital Public Radio.

“Prepare for the extinction of the Delta Smelt in the wild,” Moyle told a group of scientists with the Delta Stewardship Council. 

According to Capital Public Radio:

“He says the latest state trawl survey found very few fish in areas of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta where smelt normally gather.

‘That trawl survey came up with just six smelt, four females and two males,’ says Moyle. “Normally because they can target smelt, they would have gotten several hundred.’

Moyle says the population of Delta smelt has been declining for the last 30 years but the drought may have pushed the species to the point of no return. If the smelt is officially declared extinct, which could take several years, the declaration could change how water is managed in California.

‘All these biological opinions on Delta smelt that have restricted some of the pumping will have to be changed,’ says Moyle.

But Moyle says pumping water from the Delta to Central and Southern California could still be restricted at certain times because of all the other threatened fish populations.”

The Delta smelt, an indicator species that demonstrates the health of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, reached a new record low population level in 2014, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s fall midwater trawl survey that was released in January.

Department staff found a total of only eight smelt at a total of 100 sites sampled each month from September through December

The smelt is considered an indicator species because the 2.0 to 2.8 inch long fish is endemic to the estuary and spends all of its life in the Delta.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has conducted the Fall Midwater Trawl Survey (FMWT) to index the fall abundance of pelagic (open water) fish, including Delta smelt, striped bass, longfin smelt, threadfin shad and American shad, nearly annually since 1967. The index of each species is a number that indicates a relative population abundance.

Watch Nestle’s CEO declare water “food that should be privatized, and not a human right”:

Source:http://collectivelyconscious.net

 

NESTLÉ CONTINUES STEALING WORLD’S WATER, WHILE CALIFORNIA SUFFERS SERIOUS DROUGHT


California is currently in its fifth year of severe drought, which means all of California remains in a state of emergency. And it’s not just Californians who are impacted, because the state uses its minimal water supply to provide the entire nation with more food than any other state.

Locals, former forest employees, environmental groups, and more have been continuously trying to expose Swiss-based company Nestlé’s reckless behaviour of piping tens of millions of gallons of water out of San Bernardino National Forest annually. From Sacramento alone they take 80 million gallons each year. What’s worse, they are then selling people’s water back to them under the allure of brand names while the state, and consequentially, the nation, suffers the consequences.

The company’s permit to extract water from the park technically expired in 1988, but despite both this legal reality and the ongoing severe drought, they claim to take water management very seriously. So while they write well-articulated responses on their website regarding the issue at hand, many people continue to stand by the fact that it’s absolutely wrong to extract and profit from local waters during a drought.

“Nestlé pays only 65 cents for each 470 gallons it pumps out of the ground – the same rate as an average residential water user. But the company can turn the area’s water around, and sell it back to Sacramento at mammoth profits,” notes a coalition of environmentalists, Native Americans, and other concerned people.

In San Bernardino, the company dishes out a humbling $500 a year to pipe out natural spring water. “This is exactly what happens when water is treated as a commodity and is sold for profit,” explains John Stewart, the Deputy Campaigns Director at the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International. “It is forcing us all as a society to say, ‘Who is providing our water? Is it Nestlé or our own democratically governed towns and cities?’”

To put the unjust operation to a halt, environmental groups are hoping to prove the claim that Nestlé is breaking federal law by operating on an expired permit to extract water from San Bernardino National Forest. “They are taking water from a national forest that desperately needs that water,” says Michael O’Heaney, who is the Executive Director at the Story of Stuff, a group that pushes for the cleanup of consumer culture. “The Forest Service is obligated by law to ensure the natural resources of the forest are protected.”

nestle

Will a lawsuit against the company do any good? There is an overwhelming concern that, despite the facts, the law system won’t pull through. As corruption will have it, those with the most money seem to come out ahead.

People are sick of these abuses, however, and will fight to raise awareness anyway. That is why a coalition, made up of the Crunch Nestlé Alliance, the Story of Stuff Project, and co-plaintiffs from the Center for Biological Diversity and the Courage Campaign Institute have filed the lawsuit.

According to the coalition, they are “protesting Nestlé’s virtually unlimited use of water – up to 80 million gallons a year drawn from local aquifers – while Sacramentans (like other Californians) who use a mere 7 to 10 percent of total water used in the State of California, have had severe restrictions and limitations forced upon them.”

Nestlé is the biggest supplier of the world’s bottled water, which includes brand names such as Perrier, San Pellegrino, Pure Life, Ice Mountain, Zephyrhills, Poland Spring, and Deer Park, among others.

We must not sit passively as we watch criminal corporations, criminal governments and banks, and the military industrial complex work together to take away our money, desecrate our environment, and threaten our future.

We need to make it tough for these giant corporations to slip through the cracks. It’s not useless. In fact, other companies fear the negative public relations regarding bottling water during a drought. Starbucks, for instance, agreed to stop sourcing its bottled water brand Ethos in California because of the “serious drought conditions and water conservation efforts in California.” So the more we speak out, the better chance we have of effecting real change.

Nestle Being Sued for $100 Million Dollars Over Hazardous Lead in Food


The Indian government has announced that it is suing mega corporation Nestle over claims it deceptively allowed unsafe and illegal levels of lead in Maggi instant noodles, one of the company’s most popular products in the country. The lawsuit, which seeks nearly $100 million in damages, alleges Nestle engaged in “unfair trade practices” and alleges the noodles are unfit for human consumption.

On Wednesday, the Indian government officially declared that it filed suit in the country’s top consumer court, the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC), which has semi-judicial powers. It seeks 6,400 million rupees, or $98.6 million in damages from Nestle India.

 “Our complaint is over their unfair trade practices and the court will now issue them notices to hear their response,” said G. Gurcharan, a secretary at the Ministry of Consumer Affairs.

Sales of the noodles plunged after India’s food safety regulator reported in June that it had tested the noodles and found “unsafe and hazardous” levels of lead. According to the EPA, exposure to unsafe amounts of lead, if chronic and left untreated, is associated with serious side effects:

In adults, lead poisoning can cause:

  • poor muscle coordination
  • nerve damage to the sense organs and nerves controlling the body
  • increased blood pressure
  • hearing and vision impairment
  • reproductive problems (e.g., decreased sperm count)
  • retarded fetal development even at relatively low exposure levels

 

In children, lead poisoning can cause:

  • damage to the brain and nervous system
  • behavioral problems
  • anemia
  • liver and kidney damage
  • hearing loss
  • hyperactivity
  • developmental delays
  • in extreme cases, death

 

In addition to lead, the analysis of the noodles reportedly detected monosodium glutamate, a chemical flavor enhancer that has come under fire in recent years for its potential toxicity.

Predictably, Nestle India maintains it has done nothing wrong. “In recent months, we had over 2,700 samples of MAGGI Noodles tested by several accredited laboratories both in India and abroad. Each one of these tests have shown lead to be far below the permissible limits,” said an official statement. If the Indian government’s concerns prove warranted, however, this would mean Nestle is lying about its claims of safety. Nestle India has already agreed to withdraw all Maggi noodles from shelves in India and said it would destroy over 3.2 billion rupees ($50 billion) worth of the product.

Indian officials maintain the dangers of the Maggi noodles are real. “It’s a serious matter concerning public health and the law allows us to take suo moto legal steps, or legal actions, against erring entities,” said one official from the ministry in June when the announcement was made that the government intended to file suit. At the same time, the national food inspection agency announced plans to investigate Nestle’s eight factories around the country, though they do not all produce Maggi noodles.

India is no stranger to strife caused by food and biotech giants. It recently dealt with hundreds of thousands of suicides by Indian farmers, who struggled with crippling debt they incurred to buy high-priced GMO seeds. India has instituted stringent policies on GMOs.

Though the facts of the case are disputed, the current lawsuit against Nestle is yet another example of global backlash against the questionable—and often outright sinister—practices of powerful corporations.

The Privatization of Water: Nestlé Denies that Water is a Fundamental Human Right.


water-fluoridation-1

The current Chairman and former CEO of Nestlé, the largest producer of food products in the world, believes that the answer to global water issues is privatization. This statement is on record from the wonderful company that has peddled junk food in the Amazon, has invested money to thwart the labeling of GMO-filled products, has a disturbing health and ethics record for its infant formula, and has deployed a cyber army to monitor Internet criticism and shape discussions in social media.

This is apparently the company we should trust to manage our water, despite the record of large bottling companies like Nestlé having a track record of creating shortages:

Large multinational beverage companies are usually given water-well privileges (and even tax breaks) over citizens because they create jobs, which is apparently more important to the local governments than water rights to other taxpaying citizens. These companies such as Coca Cola and Nestlé (which bottles suburban Michigan well-water and calls it Poland Spring) suck up millions of gallons of water, leaving the public to suffer with any shortages.

But Chairman, Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, believes that “access to water is not a public right.” Nor is it a human right. So if privatization is the answer, is this the company in which the public should place its trust?

Here is just one example, among many, of his company’s concern for the public thus far:

In the small Pakistani community of Bhati Dilwan, a former village councilor says children are being sickened by filthy water. Who’s to blame? He says it’s bottled water-maker Nestlé, which dug a deep well that is depriving locals of potable water. “The water is not only very dirty, but the water level sank from 100 to 300 to 400 feet,” Dilwan says.

Why? Because if the community had fresh water piped in, it would deprive Nestlé of its lucrative market in water bottled under the Pure Life brand.

In the subtitled video below, from several years back, Brabeck discusses his views on water, as well as some interesting comments concerning his view of Nature — that it is “pitiless” — and, of course, the obligatory statement that organic food is bad and GM is great. In fact, according to Brabeck, you are essentially an extremist to hold views opposite to his own. His statements are important to review as we continue to see the world around us become reshaped into a more mechanized environment in order to stave off that pitiless Nature to which he refers.

The conclusion to this segment is perhaps the most revealing about Brabeck’s worldview, as he highlights a clip of one of his factory operations. Evidently, the savior-like role of the Nestlé Group in ensuring the health of the global population should be graciously welcomed. Are you convinced?

Source: http://www.globalresearch.ca