7 Period Problems You Shouldn’t Ignore


Read this if your red tide wipes you out.
woman-lying-on-bed-period

There are some period problems that are unfortunately par for the course, like cramps, irritability, and bleeding more than you would like to be bleeding from your vagina.

But there are also some period problems that you should bring up to your doctor—just in case—because they’re a bit outside of what’s normally expected during menstruation. Here are some things to keep an eye out for.

1. You soak through a pad or tampon in an hour or less, your period lasts longer than seven days, or both.

The clinical term for an exceedingly heavy or long period is menorrhagia. These are basically horror movie-style periods, but some people don’t even realize this kind of bleeding is abnormal. “One of the biggest problems is someone being so used to heavy bleeding that she underplays the amount,” Lauren Streicher, M.D., an associate professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, tells SELF. “She’ll come in and say her periods aren’t too bad, then say she has to change her tampon every hour.” Passing clots larger than a quarter is also a sign your bleeding is too heavy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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It’s not just that bleeding way too much or for too long is messy and inconvenient. Losing more than the typical two to three tablespoons of blood during your period or bleeding for longer than seven days can lead to anemia, the CDC says. If you have anemia, you lack enough healthy red blood cells to get oxygen to all your tissues, so you may feel tired and weak, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Bleeding too much can also be a sign of various health issues, like uterine fibroids, which are benign growths in and on the uterus that can sometimes come along with problems like pelvic pain and frequent urination. Uterine polyps, which are growths on the inner lining of the uterus, can also cause heavy bleeding, as can cervical polyps, which are lumps that emerge from the cervix. Both types of polyps are typically non-cancerous but, in rare cases, may contain cancer cells.

The hormonal issue polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can also cause heavy bleeding. Worse, this bleeding can strike after months of an MIA period. This gives your uterine lining a chance to build up over time, leading to an abnormally heavy period when it finally comes, Mary Jane Minkin, M.D., a clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale Medical School, tells SELF. PCOS can also cause symptoms like excess face and body hair or severe acne, thanks to high levels of male hormones.

Heavy menstrual bleeding could even be a sign of a disorder that causes you to lose too much blood, like idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP usually comes along with other symptoms like easy and excessive bruising or a rash of reddish-purple dots on a person’s lower legs.

Clearly, figuring out what’s causing your heavy bleeding won’t be easy on your own, so you should see your doctor. They’ll typically ask about your other symptoms and perform exams to determine what exactly is going on, and treatment will depend on what you’re dealing with.

2. Your period brings days of pain that make it practically impossible to leave your bed.

Dr. Streicher’s rule is essentially that if you’re experiencing even an iota of period pain beyond what you’re fine with, it’s too much. The first step is typically to take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, since they block hormone-like chemicals known as prostaglandins that cause uterine cramping. If that knocks out your cramps, you’re good to go. If you’re still curled up in the fetal position after a few hours, that’s a sign that you need evaluation, Dr. Streicher says. You’re dealing with dysmenorrhea (severe menstrual cramps), and doctors can help.

There are many different causes of overboard menstrual cramps. Fibroids are a common culprit. So is endometriosis, a condition many experts think happens when tissue lining the uterus travels outside of it and begins growing on other organs. (Other experts believe that tissue is actually different in that it can make its own estrogen, which can create painful inflammation in people with endometriosis.) In addition to causing extremely painful periods, endometriosis can lead to painful intercourse, occasional heavy periods, and infertility, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Adenomyosis, which happens when the endometrial tissue lining the uterus grows into the muscular walls of the organ, can also cause terrible menstrual pain, along with expelling big clots during your period and pain during intercourse.

3. You never know when your period is going to show up.

Pour one out for all the times you thought you’d have a period-free vacation, only for it to show up right as you hit the beach. Fun! Irregular periods could be due to a number of different things that are (at least somewhat) in your control, like stress and travel, Dr. Streicher says. But they can also happen because of various health conditions.

Take thyroid issues, for instance. Hypothyroidism, which is when your thyroid gland in your neck doesn’t produce enough hormones, can lead to an irregular period, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also cause myriad other symptoms, like heavier than usual periods, fatigue, constipation, dry skin, weight gain, impaired memory, and more. Treatment typically involves taking medication that mimics the thyroid hormone.

On the flip side, hyperthyroidism, which is when your thyroid gland is overactive, can cause light or infrequent menstruation, along with issues like sudden weight loss, rapid heart rate, increased appetite, and more frequent bowel movements, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Irregular periods are also a sign of premature ovarian failure, which is when a person younger than 40 starts losing their normal ovarian function, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can also cause menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and difficulty conceiving. Doctors can offer estrogen therapy to relieve symptoms like hot flashes (typically in conjunction with progesterone to avoid the precancerous cells that may take hold if you take estrogen alone). They can also counsel you about the possibility of in vitro fertilization if you’d like to physically conceive and carry children in the future.

PCOS and uterine polyps be behind irregular bleeding, too.

4. Your period decides not to show up for a while.

While it’s true that you can sometimes randomly miss a period for reasons like stress, you shouldn’t just ignore a long-term missing period. Suddenly being period-free may feel blissful, but you’ll want to make sure there’s not a health issue going on, like PCOS, an eating disorder or excessive exercise affecting your menstruation…or, yes, pregnancy.

“If you’re menstruating normally then suddenly go months without a period, that’s not something to ignore,” Dr. Streicher says. If your period vanishes for three months or longer (this is known as amenorrhea), see your doctor for evaluation.

It’s worth noting that the use of some hormonal birth control methods—especially the hormonal IUD—can make your period basically disappear. Still, check with your doctor, just in case, when this happens.

5. You’re dealing with a lot of unexpected spotting between periods.

There are times when this is normal, like if you’ve just started a new type of birth control, or even if you’re pregnant (spotting can be totally fine during pregnancy), Dr. Minkin says. But if nothing in your life has changed and you start spotting between periods, call your doctor for an appointment.

It could be something that’s ultimately pretty harmless, like a benign uterine or cervical polyp that’s causing bleeding between periods. But spotting is also a hallmark of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which is the result of sexually transmitted bacteria from infections like chlamydia and gonorrhea spreading to reproductive organs like your uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. In addition, pelvic inflammatory disease can cause issues like fever, strange vaginal discharge that smells bad, and burning when you pee.

If you have PID, your doctor will first address the STI in question with antibiotics, says the CDC, then treat your partner for an STI if necessary. Pelvic inflammatory disease is a leading cause of chronic pelvic pain and infertility in women, so if you suspect you have it, treatment is of the essence.

More rarely, spotting in between periods can be a sign of cervical cancer, according to the Mayo Clinic. Cervical cancer can come along with watery, bloody discharge that might have a bad odor and pelvic pain, including during intercourse. Even though this likely isn’t your issue, you’ll want to get checked out, just in case. Treatment for cervical cancer may involve a hysterectomy, radiation, or chemotherapy.

6. You experience debilitating mood issues before your period.

When your estrogen and progesterone drop before your period, you may experience the typical mood swings that mark premenstrual syndrome (PMS). (Bear in mind that this may not be as drastic if you’re on hormonal birth control, which stabilizes your hormones throughout your cycle.)

But if you deal with severe mood swings, irritability, anger, a lack of enjoyment in things you usually enjoy, and other symptoms that affect your life, you may have premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMDD happens when you experience these symptoms in the week before your period, then they start getting better in the first few days of bleeding, and disappear in the weeks after your period. It’s listed in the DSM-5, the most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, for good reason: This psychological issue can completely turn your life upside down.

“If you suspect you have PMDD, the one thing I would encourage is keeping a daily record of the severity of your symptoms,” Dr. Minkin says. If these symptoms only rear their head the week before your period, PMDD might be your issue. If you realize you’re constantly dealing with them and your period just makes them worse, it might be premenstrual exacerbation, which is another way of saying you have a mental illness like depression that gets worse during your period.

Either way, a doctor can help. If you have PMDD, your doctor may have you take antidepressants in the timeframe when you usually experience symptoms, then stop once your period starts, Dr. Minkin says. (If you have premenstrual exacerbation, they may recommend staying on the antidepressants through the month and potentially upping your dosage in the week before your period.)

Or your doctor may suggest you go on birth control using a synthetic version of progesterone called drospirenone, Dr. Minin says, like Yaz and Beyaz. These are FDA-approved to treat PMDD. Though experts aren’t sure why they can be so successful in this arena, it may be because drospirenone reduces a person’s response to hormonal fluctuations. It’s also a diuretic, meaning it can flush out liquids that could otherwise cause fluid retention and contribute to annoying issues like bloating.

7. You have excruciating migraines before or during your period.

If migraines had any home training, they’d at least leave you alone when you’re about to get your period. Unfortunately, period migraines are indeed a thing.

It’s not that menstruation will just randomly cause migraines in unsuspecting people who have never had one, but women with a history of migraines may experience them before or during their periods, according to the Mayo Clinic, which adds that this may be due to estrogen fluctuations. “They tend to get the headache right as they go into their periods, and it seems to get better after they have had their menses for a day or two,” Dr. Minkin says.

If you’re dealing with this, your typical migraine medication may work for you. As you probably know if you’ve grappled with migraines, the treatment options are legion. They include pain-relieving medications to relieve symptoms ASAP and preventive drugs to ward off migraines altogether, according to the Mayo Clinic. In the former camp, you have choices like anti-nausea meds and triptans, which constrict swollen blood vessels and block pain pathways in the brain. In the latter, you’ve got meds like tricylic antidepressants, which affect brain chemicals like serotonin that may be implicated in migraines.

No matter what your period problem may be, you don’t have to suffer in silence.

You have no reason to feel embarrassed about your period—or the myriad problems that can come with it. After all, celebrities are out here talking about menstruation! Some pad commercials even—gasp—use red “blood,” these days! What a time to be alive.

If you’re having period problems, see your doctor for help. If they aren’t committed to relieving your symptoms, that’s a sign you should try to find a more sympathetic medical professional who can help you find the best treatment.

Traumatic events increase headaches and migraines


https://speciality.medicaldialogues.in/traumatic-events-increase-headaches-and-migraines/

These Light Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, And Even Cancer. If You Have Them, Do THIS Immediately ! 


Many of us in the effort to save energy and money, replaced our old standard light bulbs with environmentally-friendly with the new generation energy saving light bulbs.  However, the new generation of energy efficient light bulbs are so toxic that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created an emergency protocol you need to follow in the event of a bulb breakage, due to the poison gas that is released. If  broken indoors, these light bulbs release 20 times the maximum acceptable mercury concentration into the air, according to a study conducted by researchers from the Fraunhofer Wilhelm Klauditz Institute for German’s Federal Environment Agency.
do not use these light bulbs they make you sick
Energy Efficient Light Bulbs Can Cause:

Dizziness

Cluster headaches

Migraines

Seizures

Fatigue

Inability to concentrate

Anxiety

 Energy Efficient Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, and Even Cancer. Reasons to Go Back To Incandescent Bulbs.
1. Energy saving bulbs contain mercury. Murcury ia a potent neurotoxin that is especially dangerous to children and pregnant women. It is especially toxic to the brain, the nervous system, the liver and the kidneys. It can also damage the cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems. It can lead lead to tremors, anxiety, insomnia, memory loss, headaches, cancer and Alzheimer’s .
2. Energy saving bulbs can cause cancer.
A new study performed by by Peter Braun at Berlin Germany’s Alab Laboratory found these light bulbs contain poisonous carcinogens that could cause cancer:
Phenol, a mildly acidic toxic white crystalline solid, obtained from coal tar and used in chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenol).
Naphthalene, a volatile white crystalline compound, produced by the distillation of coal tar, used in mothballs and as a raw material for chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphthalene).
Styrene, an unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon, obtained as a petroleum byproduct(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styrene).
3. Energy saving light bulbs emit a lot of UV rays.
Energy saving lamps emit UV-B and traces of UV-C radiation. It is generally recognised that UV-radiation is harmful for the skin (can lead to skin cancer) and the eyes.  The radiation from these bulbs directly attacks the immune system, and furthermore damages the skin tissues enough to prevent the proper formation of vitamin D-3.
In conclusion, these bulbs are so toxic that we are not supposed to put them in the regular garbage. They are household hazardous waste. If you break one in a house, you are supposed to open all of your windows and doors, and evacuate the house for at least 15 minutes to minimize your exposure to the poisonous gas. Unfortunately, soon consumers won’t have the option to buy incandescent lights because they won’t be available. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) mandates the phase-out of incandescent light bulbs, and favors energy-efficient compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs.
Source:healthyadviceteam.com

Energy Efficient Bulbs Cause Anxiety, Migraines, and Even Cancer. Reasons to Go Back To Incandescent Bulbs


Many of us in the effort to save energy and money, replaced our old standard light bulbs with environmentally-friendly with the new generation energy saving light bulbs.  However, the new generation of energy efficient light bulbs are so toxic that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created an emergency protocol you need to follow in the event of a bulb breakage, due to the poison gas that is released. If  broken indoors, these light bulbs release 20 times the maximum acceptable mercury concentration into the air, according to a study conducted by researchers from the Fraunhofer Wilhelm Klauditz Institute for German’s Federal Environment Agency.

  • Dizziness
  • Cluster headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizures
  • Fatigue
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Anxiety

the-light-bulb-428286_640

1. Energy saving bulbs contain mercury. Murcury ia a potent neurotoxin that is especially dangerous to children and pregnant women. It is especially toxic to the brain, the nervous system, the liver and the kidneys. It can also damage the cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems. It can lead lead to tremors, anxiety, insomnia, memory loss, headaches, cancer and Alzheimer’s .

2. Energy saving bulbs can cause cancer.

A new study performed by by Peter Braun at Berlin Germany’s Alab Laboratory found these light bulbs contain poisonous carcinogens that could cause cancer:

Phenol, a mildly acidic toxic white crystalline solid, obtained from coal tar and used in chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenol).

Naphthalene, a volatile white crystalline compound, produced by the distillation of coal tar, used in mothballs and as a raw material for chemical manufacture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphthalene).

Styrene, an unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon, obtained as a petroleum byproduct(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styrene).

3. Energy saving light bulbs emit a lot of UV rays.
Energy saving lamps emit UV-B and traces of UV-C radiation. It is generally recognised that UV-radiation is harmful for the skin (can lead to skin cancer) and the eyes.  The radiation from these bulbs directly attacks the immune system, and furthermore damages the skin tissues enough to prevent the proper formation of vitamin D-3.

In conclusion, these bulbs are so toxic that we are not supposed to put them in the regular garbage. They are household hazardous waste. If you break one in a house, you are supposed to open all of your windows and doors, and evacuate the house for at least 15 minutes to minimize your exposure to the poisonous gas. Unfortunately, soon consumers won’t have the option to buy incandescent lights because they won’t be available. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) mandates the phase-out of incandescent light bulbs, and favors energy-efficient compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs.

Migraines were taken more seriously in medieval times – where did we go wrong?


Have you ever experienced a migraine? If so, perhaps you recognise this:

It feels as if there is hammering and pounding in the head. Sound or talking is unbearable, as is light or glare. The pain arises from hot, choleric fumes, together with windiness. And so one feels piercing, burning and ringing.

Such a precise explanation of the pain and disorientation experienced during migraine might have been written yesterday. In fact, it comes from an encyclopedia, compiled by the Franciscan monk Bartholomaeus Anglicus (Bartholomew the Englishman), in the 13th century.

There aren’t many ailments that have maintained so clear a course over so many centuries. And what’s more, looking at the history of migraines reveals that the ailment was actually taken more seriously in the past, something we can learn a lot from today.

Hemicrania deciphered

We can pinpoint the beginning of the history of migraine as a named disorder to Galen (c. 129 – c. 216/17 CE), the most famous philosopher and physician in the Roman Empire. Galen set migraine, or hemicrania as he termed it, apart from other types of headache: as a painful disorder affecting only half the head, caused by the ascent of vapours from the stomach that were excessive, too hot, or too cold.

The 12th-century text of Causae et Curae, which scholars generally accept as the work of the the celebrated German abbess Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), gave a compelling explanation of why migraine seized only half the brain at a time: this was a bodily force so powerful, that if it seized the whole head, the pain would be unendurable.

An 18th-century portrait of Galen.

Although Galen’s writings were lost with the fall of the Roman Empire, Galen’s term, hemicrania, persisted, being adapted and adopted into various languages over the centuries. For example, in Middle English, we find emigranea and in medieval Wales the term migran. William Dunbar, writing in Middle Scots, used the term magryme in his poem describing the physical pain of migraine as being like an arrow piercing his brow, a pain so bad that he couldn’t look at the light. Dunbar also captured the migraine aftermath, the “postdrome” that came with the new morning, when he sat down to write but was unable to find any words. His head “dulled in dullness”, his body was unrefreshed, his spirit asleep.

Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries, a wealth of remedies in manuscript and printed recipe collections suggest a sophisticated general knowledge about this disorder. For example, Jane Jackson’s recipe book, dating from 1642, gives six separate recipes for “Migrim in the Head”, requiring various amounts of effort to produce. The simpler remediescould be made in a few minutes from common garden ingredients (mix houseleek and earthworms with flour, spread it on a cloth and bind to the forehead), but the most complex concoction required equipment, planning and financial outlay to produce a medicine that would last 20 years.

As well as taking migraine seriously, Jackson’s recipe book suggests that people of the 17th century appreciated that migraine could occur on a spectrum, from the occasional acute attack to a chronic illness that could last for several days.

Losing legitimacy

These historical descriptions of migraine reveal that we have lost something. In all of the sources from the medieval and early modern period that I have come across during the five years I have spent tracing the history of migraine, one thing is clear: these people took migraine seriously.

This is important. Migraine is now accepted as a “real” disorder which affects around one in seven people, two-thirds of whom are women, and is recognised by the WHO as the sixth highest cause worldwide of years lost due to disability (YLD). But despite this, it (along with other headache disorders) is nevertheless chronically under-funded, its sufferers often ignored, dismissed or blamed, and their ailments under-diagnosed and under-treated. In her recent book Not Tonight, the sociologist Joanna Kempner has described this situation as migraine’s “legitimacy deficit”.

So what has happened? Historical sources suggest that the question we need to ask is not how we can begin to give migraine the legitimacy it needs, but when and why we stopped taking it seriously in the first place.

‘La migraine’, 1823.

Over the course of the 18th century, something changed, as migraine became the stuff of ridicule. In May 1782, for instance, a flamboyant character graced the King’s Theatre Masquerade in London, and introduced himself to the gathering as “Le Sieur Francois de Migraine, Docteur en Medicine”. And in the summer heat of August 1787, the General Evening Post described how “half Paris had the migraine, and no lady of fashion could be prevailed upon to quit her boudoir”. Migraine was becoming something to joke about, a complaint that affected a particular kind of person, usually female.

By the 19th century, physicians routinely talked of young female “martyrs”, and of sick headache and megrim as a disorder of “mothers in the lower classes of life” whose minds and bodies had been weakened by daily toil, disturbed sleep, insufficient nourishment and constant lactation.

Ring any bells? Migraine Action

During the 1980s, many migraine sufferers took the opportunity to share their experiences of migraine by entering four international art competitions. The resulting collection, which includes over 500 pieces, reveals the powerful effect migraine has on people’s lives. Perhaps most striking is the frequency with which motifs such as arrows, hammering, pounding, light, glare and disorientation appear in this art – seemingly as familiar to sufferers today as they were to the medieval poets and physicians who discussed this disorder nearly 1,000 years ago.

For the first time, this collection is the subject of a dedicated website, which has now been launched by the charity Migraine Action as part of Migraine Awareness Week.

These paintings, backing up a thousand years of historical sources, make it clear that migraine is more than just a headache. It needs to be taken as seriously now as it was by Galen.

Migraines May Signal Vitamin Deficiency; What You Should Eat To Fortify Yourself Against Headaches


Migraines symptoms strike like lightening in the heads of 38 million men, women, and children in America. The causes can be mysterious. But recent research presented at the 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society revealed that screening for vitamin deficiencies may be the key to unlock a quieter, calmer brain. Migraines can be debilitating. Every 10 seconds someone in the United States goes to the emergency room because of throbbing head pain, adding up to 1.2 million visits a day. When researchers tested 7,691 patients for vitamin deficiencies, they found those who suffered from frequent migraines were significantly more likely to have low levels of vitamin D, vitamin B2, folate, and co-enzyme Q10. Because each vitamin plays an integral role in producing energy in cells, researchers theorize that not getting enough needed vitamins could trigger a migraine, prompting the brain for help. Migraine “Further studies are needed to elucidate whether vitamin supplementation is effective in migraine patients in general, and whether patients with mild deficiency are more likely to benefit from supplementation,” said the study’s lead author Dr. Suzanne Hagler, a research fellow at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, in a statement.   Previously, a 2012 study linked magnesium deficiency to migraine. Those who suffer from migraines regularly have been found to have low levels of magnesium compared to those who don’t experience any migraines or headaches at all. Since then, doctors have recommended combining magnesium with a multivitamin when migraine symptoms first appear. These new findings may add to the list of necessary vitamins. It’s difficult to consume all of the dietary vitamins necessary to keep their body running efficiently, which is why many people turn to vitamin supplements for help. However, it’s best to try to weave in vitamin-rich food items in order to help stave off looming migraines. According to The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and is plentiful in salmon, tuna, swordfish, and also cheese and eggs. But the best options to turn to are either milk or orange juice fortified with vitamin D. Vitamin deficiencies could be the reason behind why millions of people suffer from migraines.Photo courtesy of Pixabay, public domain When it comes to vitamin B2, soybeans, spinach, turkey, almonds, and yogurt are ideal foods to incorporate into the diet. Folate is also found in many dark green vegetables like broccoli and spinach, along with chickpeas, beans, and lentils. Co-enzyme Q10 can also be found in broccoli, dark leafy greens, but also nuts, fish, shellfish, pork, chicken, and beef. Lastly, for a boost of magnesium, eat almonds, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, bananas, cashews, and flaxseed, and drink milk.

Deficiency of this Vitamin Causes Migraines and Headaches.


 

Migraines are really bad. They are horrible. You can’t do anything when a migraine is in full force.

You would do anything to get pass them. You can’t deal with them anymore. The pain became immune on the pills you take.

There could be a solution to this.

migraines

Have you ever heard that your headaches could be a result of vitamin deficiency?

Yep, if you have Vitamin B deficiency there are higher chances your headache won’t stop.

Studies show how Vitamin B deficiency leads to the higher occurrence of migraines. It comes slowly and it takes time to be developed. The symptoms come really slow and you often say it’s nothing.

Like this study here that comes from Harvard.

All these symptoms often result with a headache. This means that taking pills for a headache was wrong all the time. Even though they work, periodically.

Another study tested 52 people who regularly get migraines. It showed that people who were given vitamin supplements noticed a migraine reduction.

The others who were given placebos did not notice reductions at all.

For this study, Professor Griffiths said:

“The success of our trail has shown that safe, inexpensive vitamin supplements can treat migraine patients.”

Migraines are not just a common pain in your head. There are other symptoms, too. Some of them include nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to sound and light, anxiety, etc.

If Vitamin B deficiency is what causes your migraines, you need to keep that vitamin B level up at all cost.

You can do that by taking supplements or foods rich with this vitamin.

Here is a list of foods you need to consume:

  •      Broccoli
  •      Spinach
  •      Asparagus
  •      Fresh and Dried Fruit
  •      Vegetables
  •      Liver
  •      Chicken
  •      Peanuts
  •      Potatoes
  •      Milk
  •      Fish
  •      Rice

If you don’t suffer from migraines, you probably know someone who is. Share this with them. They could finally find the cure.

Researchers think they’ve finally figured out what causes migraines


A new study suggests that migraines are mostly caused by problems with the blood supply system, and the findings could help inform future research and treatments for the disorder.

The research, published by the International Headache Genetics Consortium (IHGC), could help resolve a question doctors have long wrestled with: whether migraines are primarily a vascular (related to blood supply) or neurological (related to the nervous system) problem.

The IHGC pulled in data from 22 different genome-wide association studies, covering almost 60,000 migraine cases in total, with groups from more than 12 countries helping with the research. All up, 38 genomic regions were linked with migraines, 28 for the first time.

While these genes are only newly associated with migraines, they have also been linked to vascular disease, smooth muscle contraction, regulation of vascular tone, and arterial functioning. The finding suggest vascular and muscle problems play a large role in migraines.

“In this latest, large-scale study, tens of new genetic risk factors were discovered,” said the leader of the IHGC, Aarno Palotie. “Because all of these variants modify the disease risk only slightly, the effect could only be seen when this large amount of samples became available.”

“These genetic findings are the first concrete step towards developing personalised, evidence-based treatments for this very complex disease,” added another of the team, John-Anker Zwart from the Oslo University Hospital in Norway. “We doctors have known for a long time that migraine patients differ from each other and the drugs that work for some patients are completely inefficient for others.”

While previous studies have found significant links between brain tissue genes and migraines, that wasn’t the case here – possibly because there weren’t enough tissue samples included in the new research, the team acknowledges.

The scientists also uncovered some evidence that migraines may be linked to the ion channels of the nervous system, which help transmit neural signals, and this is one potential area for further study.

The team shared data between various international biological databases to help identify the links between migraines and certain genomes, and the researchers were keen to emphasise the benefits of working together.

“We simply can’t overstate the importance of international collaboration when studying genetics of complex, common diseases,” said Palotie, who is also a research director at the University of Helsinki.

Ultimately the hope is that the research, and further studies that build on it, will lead to more effective and more personalised treatments for people who experience migraines. With around 1 in 7 people worldwide experiencing the painful disorder, those treatments can’t come soon enough.

Drug Proves Effective in Reducing Migraines


An investigational agent that blocks a key headache-related receptor significantly reduces the number of mean monthly migraine days, new phase 2 data show.

Findings showed that after 52 weeks, 18.5% of patients with migraine were free of these attacks, Uwe Reuter, PD Dr, MBA, Department of Neurology, and headache clinic director, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany, reported.

Dr Reuter presented results of a 12-week, phase 2, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the agent, called AMG344, as well as data at week 52 of an open-label extension phase, here at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) 2016.

AMG334 is a human IgG2 monoclonal antibody that binds selectively to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor and blocks it.

“CGRP is a neuropeptide, the most potent vasodilator in the body, and it’s believed to be the crucial neuropeptide in the development and generation of a migraine attack,” said Dr Reuter.

He reported that preclinical trials that tested AMG344 in doses up to 200 mg via subcutaneous injection and 140 mg by intravenous infusion showed an adverse event profile similar to that of placebo, without effects on blood pressure over 24 hours. In one surrogate model, a 70-mg dose of AMG344 was shown to “inhibit a CGRP response completely,” he said.

The current study enrolled patients with 4 to 14 migraine days per month and fewer than 15 headache days per month. A migraine day was defined as one with a migraine headache lasting 30 or more minutes with two or more pain features (unilateral, throbbing, moderate to severe, exacerbated with exercise/physical activity) and/or nausea or vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia.
Among the study patients, up to two previous prophylactic therapies had failed. Rescue medications were allowed during the study, but medication overuse was not. Patients could have depression or anxiety.

Study patients were randomly assigned to one of four arms: AMG344 at 70 mg (n = 107), 21 mg (n = 108), or 7 mg (n = 108) or placebo (n = 160) given once a month subcutaneously.

Demographic characteristics were similar in all groups: Patients were roughly 40 years old, and most (about 80% overall) were female. Patients had 8.6 to 8.9 migraine days per month and 5.3 to 5.5 monthly migraine attacks, depending on the group.

There were 4.2 to 4.5 days of migraine-specific medication (eg, triptans) use per month.

Migraine Days

The primary endpoint was change in monthly migraine days at week 12. The researchers found that all groups had a decrease in monthly migraine days but that the 70-mg group was “clearly significantly superior to placebo and the other groups of AMG334,” said Dr Reuter.

The total reduction of migraine days with the 70-mg group was about 3. The difference between placebo and the 70-mg AMG334 dose was 1.2 days.

A graph depicting the change in monthly migraines in all groups over time showed a steady and steep decline in the 70-mg group to week 4. The decline continued but was less steep to week 8 and then leveled off to week 12.

A post hoc analysis showed that a significant treatment effect was evident as early as week 2, said Dr Reuter.

The secondary endpoint was a 50% or greater responder rate at 12 weeks. The study found no significant difference between the placebo and the lower-dose group but a significant difference (P < .05) between the placebo group (30%) and the 70-mg group (47%) in this outcome. The significant difference could already be seen at week 4, said Dr Reuter.

At the end of the randomized part of the study, patients were all entered into an open-label extension phase, during which they took only 70 mg of AMG344. This extension phase is to continue for 5 years.

Dr Reuter presented results in 151 patients at week 52 of this extension phase. During the first few weeks, those who were originally receiving the 70-mg dose continued to have fewer migraine days, so that at about week 16, their reduction in monthly migraine days had increased from 3 to 4. At about this time, those who had switched to this dose caught up to the 70-mg dose group in terms of this reduction.

Those taking the 70-mg dose continued to have fewer headaches throughout the rest of the study.

“So there’s an additional benefit over the course of 1 year,” commented Dr Reuter.

The response rate during this extension phase was also high. At 52 weeks, 18.5% of patients had a 100% reduction in migraine days, 38.4% had a 75% or greater reduction, and 62.3% a 50% or greater reduction.

“At the end of the double-blind phase, we had a 47% responder rate, so this rate (of 62.3%) increased over the year.”

The researchers also looked at an “exploratory” endpoint of change in monthly use of migraine-specific medications. The study showed there was a decrease of about 1.7 days per month of migraine medication use.

As for adverse events (AEs), during the double-blind phase of the trial, about 50% of patients in all groups had an AE. These included nasopharyngitis, fatigue, headache, influenza, back pain, and arthralgia, and most were mild. A few patients had injection-site reactions, which is “normal,” said Dr Reuter.

These safety data “also held true” during the extension phase, he said. “There was not much of a difference in the adverse event profile at week 52.”

Asked by a delegate to further speculate on the possible mechanism of the drug, Dr Reuter said that other than it blocks a key receptor, “I don’t have a good answer” and that he could only “purely speculate.”

When asked about the long-term safety of a drug that blocks CGRP, which could be important for regulation of vascular tone, Dr Reuter noted that all the serious adverse events reported at 52 weeks have been “nonspecific,” with no evidence that the drug is harmful to the heart or to vessels.

“There is nothing specific that can be attributed to a clear-cut vascular ischemic mechanism.”

However, he stressed the importance of following patients for 5 years. “So the study will definitely show whether there are any long-term adverse events.”

This Vitamin Deficiency Can Cause Migraines


More than 300 million people worldwide — about 6 to 7 percent of men and 15 to 18 percent of women — suffer from migraine headaches, which can last anywhere from a few hours to three days. An estimated 20 million migraine attacks occur every single day.

Despite that, it’s still one of the least understood and poorly treated medical disorders, as they are likely due to a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, and neurological factors that vary from person to person.

Adding to the complexity is that the experiences of those suffering from migraines also vary greatly. Aside from throbbing, searing pain, which may or may not be one-sided, some experience “auras” prior to onset, while others do not. Other symptoms that may or may not be present include nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, sweating, and/or sensitivity to light, sound, and smells.

What Causes Migraines?

There are a number of different theories about the cause of migraines, but no one hypothesis can explain the occurrence of migraines in all sufferers. These (sometimes conflicting) theories include:

Changes in your brain chemical serotonin. When levels drop, blood vessels including those in your brain become swollen and inflamed, which can lead to migraine pain.

-Vascular constriction in your brain; from initial blood vessel constriction and a drop in blood flow, followed by dilation and stretching of blood vessels, which activates pain-signaling neurons.

-Excessive increase of blood flow in your brain. In direct contrast to the preceding theory, other research has found that migraines are not preceded by constriction and decrease in blood flow, but rather by an increase of nearly 300 percent. However, circulation then appears normal, or even slightly reduced, once the attack is in full swing.

-A neurological disorder related to nerve cell activity that sweeps across your brain, causing pain. In this case, it is thought that a wave release of neurotransmitters across your cortex can directly stimulate your trigeminal nerves, setting off the chain reaction that ends in the transmitting of pain signals.

-A nervous system disorder originating in your brain stem. Your brain stem is your control center for alertness, perception of light, noise and smell, cerebral blood flow, cardiovascular function and pain sensitivity — many, if not most, of which are part of the symptoms of a migraine attack.

Research has revealed that three clusters of cells in your brain stem are active during and after migraine. According to this hypothesis, abnormal activity in those cells could induce the sensation of pain, even when there are no pain signals being received from your brain membrane or blood vessels.

-A disruption of the subtle energies circulating throughout your body, along with unresolved emotional issues that manifest in your body as headaches.

-Mutation or dysfunction of certain genes.

Are Your Migraines Due to a Vitamin Deficiency?

In this latest study, vitamin B6, B12, and folic acid supplements were found to produce a two-fold reduction in migraines over a six-month period. Previous studies, such as a 2004 study in the European Journal of Neurology, have also reported that high doses of B2 (riboflavin) can help prevent migraine attacks.

Certain gene mutations and dysfunctions can lead to higher levels of homocysteine production, which can make you more susceptible to migraine attacks. Here they found that vitamins B6 and B12 work by reducing your homocysteine levels. They also discovered that depending on your genotype, you may need a higher or lower dose in order for it to work. Said Professor Lyn Griffiths:

“… if all patients received the same vitamin dosage for the same period of time it would be expected that those with TT genotypes, having a reduced enzymatic rate, would metabolise less homocysteine over the treatment period compared to C allele carriers, thus resulting in a smaller reduction in homocysteine and consequent migraine symptoms. 

Indeed, it may be that TT genotypes although having a higher risk of disease actually require a larger dosage of vitamins to exhibit the same effect as C alleles. Further clinical trials of much larger patient cohorts are required to test this hypothesis.”

According to Professor Griffiths, their aim is to determine the optimal dosage of B vitamins based on your genetic profile.

“The success of our trial has shown that safe, inexpensive vitamin supplements can treat migraine patients,” she said.

However, there may be yet another, even more widespread, vitamin deficiency underlying your migraine symptoms.

Just last year, researchers presented results of an observational study at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Headache Society, showing that nearly 42 percent of patients with chronic migraine were deficient in vitamin D. The study also showed that the longer you suffered from chronic migraines, the more likely you are to be vitamin D deficient.

This is yet another brand new discovery that can be tacked on to the literally hundreds of health ramifications of being vitamin D deficient.

For more information on getting tested, and how to optimize your vitamin D levels, please see this previous article. I also recommend you take the time to view my free one-hour video lecture on vitamin D, in which I go over the nearly unbelievable benefits you will receive by understanding this essential nutrient.

Common Migraine Triggers to Avoid

However, it is important for everyone to fully appreciate that treating migraines by using a simple remedy is rarely effective. So while using supplements like these B vitamins might be useful, this is still an allopathic approach that is very similar to using medications.

It is my belief that pain can be one of your strongest allies if you use it to help you to find what is truly contributing to the cause of the problem.

Just as there are numerous theories on the actual mechanics of migraine pain, there are a wide number of potential triggers — and what triggers a migraine for you might not trigger it in someone else. So rather than just popping some B vitamins you will want to consider a more comprehensive strategy.

However, here are several of the most commonly reported triggers:

-Food and Drink: Many people experience migraines when they eat certain foods, especially wheat, dairy (especially pasteurized), sugar, artificial preservatives or chemical additives. Cured or processed meats, alcohol, aspartame, caffeine, and MSG are common culprits.

-Allergies: Including food allergies and food sensitivities, and chemical sensitivities.

-Dehydration and/or Hunger

-Changes in sleeping cycle: Both missing sleep and oversleeping can trigger a migraine.

-Stress: Any kind of emotional trauma can trigger a migraine, even after the stress has passed.

-Physical exertion: Extremely intense exercise or even sex has been known to bring on migraines.

-Hormones: Some women experience migraines before, or during their periods, during pregnancy, or during menopause. Others may get migraines from hormonal medications like birth control pills, or hormone replacement therapy.

-External stimuli: Bright lights, fluorescent lights, loud noises and strong smells (even pleasant ones) can trigger a migraine.

-Weather changes, seasonal changes, and changes in altitude 

 

How to Relieve Migraine Pain Without Dangerous Drugs

Migraine pain can be seriously debilitating and may be one instance where you could justify popping a pill for instant relief. Unfortunately, migraine medications tend to only work in 50 percent of people, half the time…

They also have intense side effects such as “medication overuse headache,” which often occurs when people take too much of a headache drug. Worse than that, if you take tryptamine-based drugs, which bind to serotonin receptors to constrict your cranial blood vessels, but your pain is not due to engorged blood vessels, then constricting them can potentially do a lot of harm. And, lo and behold, serious cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke, are in fact side effects of these types of drugs.

Fortunately, there are better ways to treat migraines than pharmaceutical drugs.

First, you’ll want to make sure you avoid the triggers.

Most often this means eating healthy whole foods and avoiding processed ones. Avoiding wheat, grains, sugar and all fluids but water also seem to be particularly effective. In fact, following my eating plan typically reduces migraines by about 80 percent, as it virtually eliminates all common food-related causes of headaches.

Regular exercise will also help to keep migraines away by improving your response to stress, along with the underlying inflammatory conditions that can trigger migraines.

Those are the lifestyle choices that you’ll need to focus on long-term, if you want to reduce your migraines. But if a migraine does strike and you need immediate relief, here are a several safe, healthy alternatives that you can try:

1.    Use Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Newcomers who use this simple process by themselves achieve relief 50 percent to 80 percent of the time and, in many cases, the relief is complete and permanent. More sophisticated uses by an EFT expert may be required for some migraine sufferers.

2.    Stimulate your body’s natural painkilling ability. By putting pressure on a nerve just under your eyebrow, you can cause your pituitary gland to release painkilling endorphins immediately.

3. Take 10 teaspoons of cayenne pepper in a glass of water. Endorphins are released by your brain when the cayenne hits your stomach lining.

4. Sniff green apple scent. One study found that the scent significantly relieved migraine pain. This may also work with other scents that you enjoy so consulting with an aromatherapist may be beneficial. Other aromas that stand out of the crowd include peppermint, sandalwood oil, lavender, and eucalyptus.

5. Hot and cold packs. For some people, heat will do the trick, while others get more relief from cold. Experiment to see which one works for you, but avoid extreme temperatures. You can also try placing your hands in hot (but not scalding) water, which seems to pull pressure from your head.

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