This Popular Ketchup Damages Your, Liver, Metabolism, Immune System, Nervous System and Brain


Many of you are not aware of the method of labeling ingredients in food products. Namely, companies list the ingredients according to the amounts added to the food, from the most to the least.

 This is important as it gives you an opportunity to control what you consume.

When it comes to Heinz ketchup, we strongly advise you to stay away from it, and we give the most important reasons:

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Heinz ketchup is loaded with high fructose corn syrup, and this would have been evident if the company did not list the same ingredients twice under a different name, corn syrup, and high fructose corn syrup.

This ingredient acts as sugar in the body when metabolized, and raises the blood sugar levels, and endangers the functioning of the liver. It is derived from GMO and causes obesity, weight gain, heart diseases, diabetes, and weakened immune system.

Distilled Vinegar and Sugar

Despite the high fructose corn syrup, they have also added additional sugar- even 4 extra grams of sugar per tablespoon!

In the end, they add distilled vinegar, which is another GMO corn ingredient.

Therefore, this product contains three GMO ingredients, sugar, chemicals, and actually no place for any nutrients! Does this sound healthy, does it actually sound like a food?

The list of ingredients continues with additives, salt, onion powder, no fiber, no protein, and no nutritional value.

Therefore, we advise you to never consume this ketchup again!

Source: healinglifeisnatural.com

6 foods that can damage your metabolism the moment you eat them


While “a moment on the lips,” is well-known for meaning “forever on the hips,” did you know it can mean forever damaging your metabolism too?

It was previously thought that weight gain and weight loss were governed solely by the laws of thermodynamics (aka calories in vs. calories out.) Emerging research seems to point otherwise; not all calories are created equal. The same 100 calories that you take in guzzling a can of soda is a lot different inside the body than the 100 calories in your broccoli. Here are six foods that cost more than just their calorie load in ways of weight gain.

Soda

One of the main reasons soda gets a bad rap is because it’s sweetened with a little something known as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS, a sweetener found in many of America’s highly processed foods and soft drinks, is as damaging as it is cheap. It has been argued that Fructose consumed in the same quantities as other sugar has more damaging effects on the metabolism (making it an even more sinister commodity).  A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition further explained the link between HFCS and obesity. HFCS may lead to obesity because of its negative effects on the metabolism. In fact, consuming high fructose corn syrup can cause something called “metabolic syndrome,” which is basically a group of risk factors for diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Therefore, drinking a glass of soda can directly hurt your metabolism.

Margarine

Fortunately most sources of trans fat are off the market, but they can still be found in stick margarine and baked goods. The trans fats in the margarine can wreak havoc on your metabolism because they can lead to insulin resistance (which is when the body can’t use insulin effectively). Insulin is a hormone used in fat and carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin resistance results in slower metabolism and weight gain, especially around the abdomen, as it causes our bodies to store fat more easily

  • White Bread

White bread and other simple carbohydrates are easily broken down by the body because the fiber (which slows digestion) has been removed during processing. The body does not have to burn any extra calories to try to break down these easy-to-digest-foods, leaving your metabolism operating at a slower level. Foods that are high in fiber like whole wheat bread ramp up your metabolism due to the extra work required to try and break down the indigestible fiber.

Farmed Beef (vs. Grass-Fed)

Conventionally farmed beef can hurt our metabolisms. Conventionally farmed beef has more antibiotics than grass-fed beef. For years, we were unaware what deleterious effects the antibiotics would have on our health. One study published in Front Public Health explained the harm antibiotics have on the good bacteria in the gut of consumers. This change in bacteria in the gut is correlated with an increase in weight gain, as it changes and negatively affects the way we process food. Simply stated, consuming antibiotics from meat can make us gain weight. Our recommendation is to choose grass-fed meat as much as possible.

Conventional (non-organic) apples

Organic fruits are more expensive for more reasons than one. One study published in the Journal of Medical Toxicology showed the toxic effects of pesticides from fruits and vegetables actually caused metabolic changes (by increasing the rate at which fat cells were made) in mice, causing them to gain weight. This means the mice were eating “healthy” fruits and vegetables in the same quantities as the organic control group and were STILL gaining weight. This illustrates the metabolic changes in the mice directly from the pesticides. To limit exposure to pesticides, when it comes to the “Dirty Dozen,” (the fruits and vegetables which are most likely to soak up pesticides and bad bacteria) buy organic. To further limit pesticide exposure be sure to wash all fruits and vegetables well after purchase.

Canola/Vegetable oil

Although previously touted as a health food, canola oil is actually quite the opposite. That’s because it’s a major source of omega-6 fatty acids, which may lead to a slower metabolism.  Whereby the American diet used to be balanced in both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, a push towards higher processing has left our country filled with vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats (high sources of Omega-6), which are pro-inflammatory, and the consumption of these are correlated with obesity. A review published in the journal Nutrients explained that “A high omega-6 fatty acid intake and a high omega-6/omega-3 ratio are associated with weight gain in both animal and human studies, whereas a high omega-3 fatty acid intake decreases the risk for weight gain.” The review further explains that omega-6 fatty acids promote insulin resistance (where our body turns too much of our carbohydrates into fat) and leptin resistance (leptin is the hormone which tells us when we are full; if we are resistant, we never feel full). To limit omega-6s in your diet, switch canola oil out for olive oil.

6 foods that can damage your metabolism the moment you eat them


While “a moment on the lips,” is well-known for meaning “forever on the hips,” did you know it can mean forever damaging your metabolism too?

It was previously thought that weight gain and weight loss were governed solely by the laws of thermodynamics (aka calories in vs. calories out.) Emerging research seems to point otherwise; not all calories are created equal. The same 100 calories that you take in guzzling a can of soda is a lot different inside the body than the 100 calories in your broccoli. Here are six foods that cost more than just their calorie load in ways of weight gain.

Soda

One of the main reasons soda gets a bad rap is because it’s sweetened with a little something known as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS, a sweetener found in many of America’s highly processed foods and soft drinks, is as damaging as it is cheap. It has been argued that Fructose consumed in the same quantities as other sugar has more damaging effects on the metabolism (making it an even more sinister commodity).  A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition further explained the link between HFCS and obesity. HFCS may lead to obesity because of its negative effects on the metabolism. In fact, consuming high fructose corn syrup can cause something called “metabolic syndrome,” which is basically a group of risk factors for diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Therefore, drinking a glass of soda can directly hurt your metabolism.

Margarine

Fortunately most sources of trans fat are off the market, but they can still be found in stick margarine and baked goods. The trans fats in the margarine can wreak havoc on your metabolism because they can lead to insulin resistance (which is when the body can’t use insulin effectively). Insulin is a hormone used in fat and carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin resistance results in slower metabolism and weight gain, especially around the abdomen, as it causes our bodies to store fat more easily.

White Bread

White bread and other simple carbohydrates are easily broken down by the body because the fiber (which slows digestion) has been removed during processing. The body does not have to burn any extra calories to try to break down these easy-to-digest-foods, leaving your metabolism operating at a slower level. Foods that are high in fiber like whole wheat bread ramp up your metabolism due to the extra work required to try and break down the indigestible fiber.

Farmed Beef (vs. Grass-Fed)

Conventionally farmed beef can hurt our metabolisms. Conventionally farmed beef has more antibiotics than grass-fed beef. For years, we were unaware what deleterious effects the antibiotics would have on our health. One study published in Front Public Health explained the harm antibiotics have on the good bacteria in the gut of consumers. This change in bacteria in the gut is correlated with an increase in weight gain, as it changes and negatively affects the way we process food. Simply stated, consuming antibiotics from meat can make us gain weight. Our recommendation is to choose grass-fed meat as much as possible.

Conventional (non-organic) apples

Organic fruits are more expensive for more reasons than one. One study published in the Journal of Medical Toxicology showed the toxic effects of pesticides from fruits and vegetables actually caused metabolic changes (by increasing the rate at which fat cells were made) in mice, causing them to gain weight. This means the mice were eating “healthy” fruits and vegetables in the same quantities as the organic control group and were STILL gaining weight. This illustrates the metabolic changes in the mice directly from the pesticides. To limit exposure to pesticides, when it comes to the “Dirty Dozen,” (the fruits and vegetables which are most likely to soak up pesticides and bad bacteria) buy organic. To further limit pesticide exposure be sure to wash all fruits and vegetables well after purchase.

Canola/Vegetable oil

Although previously touted as a health food, canola oil is actually quite the opposite. That’s because it’s a major source of omega-6 fatty acids, which may lead to a slower metabolism.  Whereby the American diet used to be balanced in both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, a push towards higher processing has left our country filled with vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats (high sources of Omega-6), which are pro-inflammatory, and the consumption of these are correlated with obesity. A review published in the journal Nutrients explained that “A high omega-6 fatty acid intake and a high omega-6/omega-3 ratio are associated with weight gain in both animal and human studies, whereas a high omega-3 fatty acid intake decreases the risk for weight gain.” The review further explains that omega-6 fatty acids promote insulin resistance (where our body turns too much of our carbohydrates into fat) and leptin resistance (leptin is the hormone which tells us when we are full; if we are resistant, we never feel full). To limit omega-6s in your diet, switch canola oil out for olive oil.

Neurometabolic Disorders Could Contribute to Depression


Impairments in the production of neurotransmitters may lead to depression in some patients, preliminary results show, opening new avenues for research..

Deficiencies in key compounds that help the body make neurotransmitters may contribute to the intractability of depression in some people.

In 2002, psychiatrist Lisa Pan, a depression and suicide prevention researcher at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), met Kyle, a 19-year-old suffering from depression (name altered to preserve confidentiality). He was among the estimated 15 percent of depression patients in the U.S. for whom treatments such as antidepressants or therapy do not help. He “had been through every available treatment” including electroconvulsive therapy, but nothing worked, Pan recalls. “At one time, he was on 17 medications simultaneously.” The teenager had attempted suicide, and doctors determined that he was at risk for similar episodes. The next step for him would be state hospitalization.

Having exhausted conventional treatment options, Pan went off script. She enlisted a colleague at UPMC, geneticist David Finegold, to run tests on Kyle’s neurometabolic system, which supplies nutrients necessary to maintain neurons with a healthy supply of neurotransmitters. The tests revealed that Kyle underproduced tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a necessary cofactor for enzymes involved in making serotonin, dopamine, and other compounds that modulate emotions and mood. Pan gave him sapropterin, a synthetic form of BH4, to bring his system back into balance. “It took some time, but he got better,” she says. Kyle left the hospital and went on to graduate from college.

“We felt like we might be onto something,” Pan says. She began exploring the possibility that metabolic imbalances affected others for whom standard depression treatment had failed. She and her colleagues conducted an array of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid tests in 33 such individuals, each of whom had shown negligible response to at least three different maximum-dose depression medications administered for six weeks or more. Ranging from teenagers to middle-age adults, the group included some who also suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

When the tests came back, about a third of the patients showed a deficiency in the levels of folate in their spinal fluid, another key compound for producing a variety of neurotransmitters. Taking a folate supplement to correct this imbalance improved patients’ depression symptoms, lowering their scores on a questionnaire for suicidal thinking and another for mental and physical signs of depression. And Pan says that as each patient continued to take the supplement, their symptoms continued to improve (Am J Psych, appiajp201615111500, 2016).

Since the publication of these results, “we have gotten hundreds of phone calls from people just asking for help,” she says. As Pan returns these calls, she explains that her findings are preliminary. Her study documents relatively few individual treatment outcomes and is not a formal clinical trial. As the study continues and expands to include more patients, Pan and her colleagues will work to identify the cause of folate deficiency and to investigate whether folate supplementation could become a standard treatment. But these results suggest that treating an underlying neurometabolic imbalance can alleviate depression at least in some cases, which should open a door to new research. Receiving the influx of phone calls “makes me want to work more,” Pan says.

Characterizing depression in broad strokes is almost impossible, cautions David Brent, a former advisor to Pan and coauthor on the study. “There are a lot of people who look the same that probably have very different causes” of depression. Other psychological conditions, including PTSD and anxiety, frequently coincide with and complicate the disorder. “We’re really just at the beginning of extricating” these interacting factors, Pan says, and at this stage, developing solutions that can be standardized for treating many people is difficult.

Even so, Finegold notes that preliminary studies like this one have a way of offering hope to people who have not found a successful depression treatment. He, too, receives phone calls from people living with depression, and some express their gratitude simply to know that new aspects of the problem are being explored.

One avenue of Pan’s further exploration is to search for genetic markers associated with neurometabolic imbalances. Ideally, genetic testing could be used alongside traditional clinical evaluations to provide physicians with as much patient information as possible, says coauthor David Peters, a geneticist at UPMC. Testing spinal fluid is invasive and time-consuming; a quick DNA swab is much more practical, and Peters says incorporating genetic testing is a “very exciting prospect.”

Every six months or so, Pan checks in with Kyle. Having graduated college, he now works in environmental science, and the only medication he takes is sapropterin. In a statement he authorized her to share, Kyle says, “It’s safe to say that I owe my life to the successful diagnosis.”

8 Tricks to Keep Your Metabolism Revving


Try these tips to keep your metabolism humming like a well-oiled machine.
Try these tips to keep your metabolism humming like a well-oiled machine. 

I often tell clients to think of their bodies as they would the engine of a car. When you first get in your car and turn the ignition, fuel gets sent to the engine to get the car started. But a car also needs fuel to keep going so it doesn’t stall on the freeway, and it needs oil to keep everything lubricated and running properly. Our bodies aren’t much different. Over the years, I’ve learned a few tricks to help keep my metabolism revved, so try them and see if they can work for you!

1. Strength Training Is Key.

Seriously. For women especially, our lower bodies tend to store more fat, and our glutes are the largest muscle in our bodies. The more lean muscle you have, the more your booty will always burn! Your body burns about six calories per day to maintain a pound of muscle, but expends only two calories per pound of fat. Increasing your muscle-to-fat ratio can directly increase your metabolism, even when you’re not in the gym.

2. Drink More Water.

The chronic mild dehydration that up to 75 percent of adults suffer from can slow your metabolism. Adequate daily water intake falls between half an ounce to one ounce per pound of body weight, but can vary based upon your environment and activity level. Drinking enough water can also fight the fatigue and joint pain that may slow down your workouts. Adding lemon keeps the flavor of water interesting and helps your liver function as the body’s built-in detoxification system by promoting more efficient stomach digestion.

Seventy-five percent of adults suffer chronic mild dehydration which can slow metabolism.
Seventy-five percent of adults suffer chronic mild dehydration which can slow metabolism. 

3. Make Your Bathroom Breaks Mini Workouts.

I go to the bathroom almost every hour. On days when I spend a good part sitting or don’t have time for a workout, I’ll do push-ups after every break. Sometimes I’ll add a few jump squats and bicycle crunches. When you get up for more-frequent bathroom breaks (in response to better hydration), take a couple of quick laps around the office to get in a bit more cardio.

4. Eat More Protein.

Protein takes longer to digest, and the body burns more calories digesting it than carbohydrates and fats. Lean meats, such as a turkey burger on a lettuce “bun,” are great sources of protein and micronutrients. Another option is to replace high-carbohydrate foods like pasta with a higher-protein alternative, such as black-bean pasta.

Steelhead trout with sunchokes and maitake mushrooms. Fish is an excellent choice for a high-protein meal.
Steelhead trout with sunchokes and maitake mushrooms. Fish is an excellent choice for a high-protein meal. 

5. Add Intervals to Your Workout.

Interval workouts consist of short bursts of intense activity followed by rest periods. HIIT has been shown to burn fat more effectively than steady-state cardio and promote muscle building. If you’re new to HIIT, try sprinting for 30 seconds on a treadmill (you can add an incline to increase the intensity) then walk or jog for one minute. Repeat this 10 times and your metabolism will be revving high all day long!

6. Integrate Core and Balance Training.

This will help you get more bang for your buck. Any exercise you do on a flat surface, try to do on a balance device. I love the BOSU Ball: If you’re doing chest presses, do it on an exercise ball to work your core and stabilizers at the same time while also reducing the risk of injury.

7. Start Fidgeting.

All those small movements you do throughout the day can add up: Stand while you’re on the phone, and pace the room while you’re on a conference call. At your desk, take breaks to reach your arms overhead for a good stretch. Take the stairs, not the elevator. As we get older, spending too much time sitting can promote joint and muscle stiffness, bad posture, back pain and ultimately lead to higher rates of injury. Make sure you get up, stretch and walk around once every hour. Even better, get a standing desk or a treadmill desk at the office.

8. Eat More Fiber.

Fiber pushes everything through by helping the body process food more effectively. It also slows down carbohydrates’ digestion and absorption, which means your body is burning calories even after you’re done eating. Daily fiber recommendations are 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women. A variety of both soluble fiber foods (apples) and insoluble high-fiber foods (whole grains) is best for supporting a healthy metabolism and digestive system.

Bonus: Active Rest Days. Try to spend your rest days doing errands — grocery shopping, laundry, washing your car, etc. All of these daily activities burn calories while giving your body a much-needed break.

As I’ve gotten older and wiser, I’ve learned that by incorporating these things on a daily basis I feel more comfortable indulging a little bit each day because I know my metabolism has adequate fuel to power my body!

How to Reset Your Thyroid to Burn Fat and Activate Your Metabolism


Erika Schwartz, MD, was consulted for a medical advice by an elderly man with serious health issues. Namely, she examined the medications and treatments he was subjected to, and decided to consult his cardiologist whether he would agree to completely change his therapy.

Namely, the man suffered from excess weight, low testosterone and thyroid levels, sleeping disorders due to an advanced stage of eczema which caused unbearable itching.

She has been trying to reach his cardiologist for three weeks, and eventually, she succeeded. However, after suggesting the elimination of the medications which contributed to the eczema of the patient, she states:

“The guy said to me, ‘I can’t talk to you. You don’t know science.” After stating that they have the same medical degree, she adds “he hung up on me!”

Therefore, after this discussion, she explained all she had to her patient and he decided to change his cardiologist and try the plan she suggested. The treatments she had in mind consisted of boosting the level of the thyroid hormones and eliminating the medication for his cholesterol.

At the beginning, the patient believed that this treatment would lead to a heart attack, but Dr. Schwartz explained that the correction of the hormones naturally maintained the cholesterol low.

Thyroid hormones are a result of the function of the thyroid gland—which is an endocrine gland in the form of a butterfly found in the lower front of the neck.

The two thyroid hormones—triiodothyronine and thyroxine—are also known as T3 and T4. T4 is turned into the active T3 in cells, and it reaches the body organs through the bloodstream.

Its main function is to regulate metabolism and provide energy, but it also has a significant influence on the entire body, as it helps the organs to function optimally.

The most common issue linked to the thyroid is hypothyroidism—which is the state of underactive thyroid, that is the gland does not produce sufficient hormones to regulate the necessary body functions.

It can be a result of numerous internal and external factors, such as Hashimoto’s disease, which is an autoimmune condition in which the thyroid is attacked by the immune system itself.

Hypothyroidism can be manifested by numerous different symptoms, including dry skin, brittle nails, fatigue, hair loss, weight gain, body temperature irregularities, feeling cold, poor reflexes, depression, brain fog, mood swings etc.

However, as these symptoms can also indicate other diseases or ailments as well, doctors mat often prescribe some medications that are not adequate, and do not even consider the thyroid imbalance as a potential cause.

Mary Shomon, a thyroid expert and author of numerous books on the theme, states: “People are going in with high cholesterol or depression and are getting handed cholesterol meds and antidepressants. And no one’s ever checking to see if the thyroid is at the root of the problem.”

She moreover says that there is a critical flaw in the conventional test to diagnose hypothyroidism. This test, known as the thyroid stimulating hormone test or TSH test, actually measures the level of a pituitary hormone, TS, in the blood.

However, this test does not show the amount of T3 or T4 in the blood, as the pituitary hormone directs the thyroid gland to produce and release thyroid hormones.

Hence, this is a flaw as numerous patients experience the symptoms listed above but still have a normal TSH result, so they consequently are prescribed to take medications that do not treat their root problem and even suffer from their side- effects.

Dr. Schwartz claims “At the end of the day, we suffer because we’re treating individual symptoms, and we don’t look at the body—at the person—as a whole.[The TSH test] is actually doing a disservice to anybody who wants to take care of themselves, or someone who actually wants to take care of the patient.”

For better results, the levels of T3 and T4 should be individually examined. Moreover, it is of vital importance to be sure that T4 is being turned into active T3 and that the T3 enters cells in order to regulate the function of the body organs.

The holistic treatment of Dr. Schwartz includes alteration of everything, including the diet, hormones, exercise and supplements. Her approach regards the body as a whole and does not examine just the symptoms, and consequently, it has given great results.

She says: “What I also found out was that giving those people thyroid to begin with—giving them T3, let’s say, to begin with, which is the active thyroid hormone—was actually the quickest way to get people to feel better. And once they felt better, then you could tweak their diet, exercise, lifestyle.”

The belief that the way thyroid hormones influence the entire body is a vital part of the successful  treatment is also shared by Shomon:

“Our metabolism relies, in large part, on our thyroid’s ability to function properly. If we’re not getting enough oxygen or energy to the cells for digestion, for pancreatic function, for brain function, for all of the other hormone production processes and the glands that are producing those, then everything is going to be slowing down and not working properly,” she explains. “It’s the gas pedal, essentially, for everything.”

Hence, both internal and external factors lead to thyroid disorders, as they may result from a combination of certain aspects like immunity, diet, hormones, the environment, immunity, and the like.

“We’re living in such a toxic world—and our lifestyles have changed so much.And that’s a critical thing for us to realize when we look at our diets and we look at our daily habits. We have to put in place some strategies to compensate for the fact that we’ve moved so far from our natural evolutionary ancestral history.”- says Greg Emerson, MD, founder of the Emerson Health & Wellness Center in Queensland, Australia.

The leading ones on his list of toxins are mold and mycotoxins, which are a result of some fungi types.

“There’s a huge amount of scientific evidence that the poisons that the mold produce are terrible for the thyroid gland. And the other problem is that we’re consuming foods which are also high in mycotoxins.

Or we’re consuming foods that are high in sugar, which makes the mold grow in the body. And we’re also not consuming foods which are protective against those mycotoxins. I don’t think I’ve seen a patient with Graves’ disease—which is an overactive thyroid—who has not had a problem with mold, and then mycotoxins.”

The opposite case is hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid, which is the state of excess production of thyroid hormones. This state leads to sudden weight loss due to a revved up metabolism, as well as a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

However, the imbalance of the hormones can be restored to normal by making some important changes in the lifestyle. Initially, eat a diet high in raw foods, regularly exercise, foster healthy relationships; and try to reduce stress.

Dr. Emerson suggests that you ask the following questions to yourself: “Am I eating the right food? Am I drinking the right water? Am I getting enough sun? Am I getting enough sleep? Am I getting enough exercise? Am I getting medicines in my food?”

Dr. Schwartz adds: “Listen to what your body’s saying. If you can’t sleep at night, why don’t you sleep at night? Did you drink too much and it woke you up in the middle of the night? Are you eating too late? Are you eating the wrong foods? Are you exercising too late? Do you have all this electronic equipment sitting right next to you? Do you sleep with the TV on?”

Therefore, of you properly take care of the things explained above, you will easily specify the root of your health issue, and thus, find the proper natural treatment.

Dr. Schwartz comments “There are a million reasons why you may not be sleeping at night. And you need to look at them and take responsibility for improving.”

One of the best and most popular American alternative medicine doctors, Joseph Mercola, DO, also agrees with the basic logic of Dr. Schwartz, since he also believes that in order to maintain good health, you need to work on many aspects.

Yet, he believes that the major control of the health is done by research and finding quality resources, as well as consulting experienced individuals, doctors and experts. He also believes that “It’s probably the mindset that you are responsible for your health.”

By restarting your thyroid with the proper nutrients, not only can you keep weight off, but you can also help slow down the aging process, boost your energy, and improve your overall health.

So here are few very important tips for how to restart your thyroid:

To restart your thyroid you should combine iodized salt and selenium rich foods such as:

  • Brazil nuts
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Fish (wild salmon, halibut, sardines, flounder)
  • Shellfish (oysters, mussels, shrimp, clams, scallops)
  • Meat (Beef, liver, lamb, pork)
  • Poultry (chicken, turkey)
  • Eggs (up to 3 per day)
  • Mushrooms (button, crimini, shiitake)
  • Whole grains (wheat germ, barley, brown rice, oats)
  • Veggies (Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bean Sprouts, Beet Greens, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumber)
  • Fruits (all types of berries and lemons)

Make sure DO NOT EAT these foods:

  • Dairy (avoid dairy for at least 20 days)
  • Avoid Sugar and Sweeteners
  • Avoid all Grains
  • Avoid Beans and Legumes
  • Avoid Beer

Also make sure to avoid:

  • calorie restricted diets
  • low fat diets
  • very low carbohydrate diets (or at least be very cautious with these types of diets)
  • avoid eating more than 6-8 servings of Goitrogenic foods per week and these foods should be steamed instead of eaten raw.

And for the end you must start doing low intensity exercise for at least 1 hour per day like:

  • Walking
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Swimming

And after a month start doing high intensity exercise from 1 to 3 times per week, like:

  • Body Weight Exercises
  • Weight Lifting Exercises

10 Diet Mistakes Seriously Slowing Your Metabolism


10 things slowing down your metabolism

You probably don’t need scientists to tell you that your metabolism slows with age. But they’re studying it anyway—and coming up with exciting research to help rev it up again. The average woman gains 1½ pounds a year during her adult life—enough to pack on 40-plus pounds by her 50s, if she doesn’t combat the roller coaster of hormones, muscle loss, and stress that conspire to slow her fat-burning engine. But midlife weight gain isn’t inevitable: We’ve found eating strategies that will tackle these changes.
But first, the basics: To boost over-40 weight loss, make sure your meals are around 400 calories, the amount needed to fuel your body while keeping you satisfied, translating into effortless weight loss. The following metabolism-boosting food rules were developed by Dan Benardot, PhD, RD, an associate professor of nutrition and kinesiology at Georgia State University, and Tammy Lakatos, RD. Here’s how to adjust your eating plan to help your body burn fat.

Mistake: You don’t eat enough
You need to cut calories to lose weight, but it’s important not to overdo it. Going too low delivers a double whammy to your metabolism. When you eat less than you need for basic biological function (about 1,200 calories for most women), your body throws the brakes on your metabolism. It also begins to break down precious, calorie-burning muscle tissue for energy, says Benardot. “Eat just enough so you’re not hungry—a healthy snack midmorning and midafternoon between three meals (about 430 calories each) will keep your metabolism humming.” By eating a meal every 3 to 4 hours, you’ll stay satisfied and keep from overeating later in the day.

Mistake: You avoid caffeine
Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant, so your daily java jolts can rev your metabolism 5 to 8%—about 98 to 174 calories a day. A cup of brewed tea can raise your metabolism by 12%, according to one Japanese study. Researchers believe the antioxidant catechins in tea provide the boost.

Mistake: Your carbs are white
Boost your fiber intake by switching to whole wheat bread, pasta, and eating more fruits and vegetables. Research shows that some fiber can rev your fat burn by as much as 30%. Studies find that women who eat the most fiber gain the least weight over time. Aim for about 25 g a day—the amount in about three servings each of fruits and vegetables. (Here’s how to sneak more fiber into your diet.)

Mistake: Your water is room temperature
Photo by hdere/Getty Images

German researchers found that drinking 6 cups of cold water a day (that’s 48 ounces) can raise resting metabolism by about 50 calories daily—enough to shed 5 pounds in a year. The increase may come from the work it takes to heat the water to body temperature. (Not a plain water fan? Try these 25 slimming Sassy Water recipes.)

Mistake: Your food is covered with pesticides
Canadian researchers report that dieters with the most organochlorines (pollutants from pesticides, which are stored in fat cells) experience a greater than normal dip in metabolism as they lose weight, perhaps because the toxins interfere with the energy-burning process. Other research hints that pesticides can trigger weight gain. Always choose organic when buying peaches, apples, bell peppers, celery, nectarines, strawberries, cherries, lettuce, imported grapes, and pears; non-organic versions tend to have the highest levels of pesticides. But going organic is just the first step. Here are 23 more ways to eat clean.

Mistake: Your meal lacks protein
Photo by Liv Friis/Getty Images

Make sure protein is a component in every meal. Your body needs it to maintain lean muscle. Add a serving, like 3 ounces of lean meat, 2 tablespoons of nuts, or 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt, to every meal and snack. Research shows protein can up postmeal calorie burn by as much as 35%.

Mistake: Your diet needs to pump iron
Iron-rich foods are essential for carrying the oxygen your muscles need to burn fat, says Lakatos. Until menopause, women lose iron each month through menstruation. Unless you restock your stores, you run the risk of low energy and a sagging metabolism. Shellfish, lean meats, beans, fortified cereals, and spinach are excellent sources or iron.

Mistake: You’re missing vitamin D
Vitamin D is essential for preserving metabolism-revving muscle tissue. Unfortunately, researchers estimate that a measly 4% of Americans over age 50 take in enough through their diet. Get 90% of your recommended daily value (400 IU) in a 3.5-ounce serving of salmon. Other good sources: tuna, shrimp, tofu, fortified milk and cereal, and eggs. (Check out these 8 excellent sources of vitamin D.)

Mistake: You’ve had one drink too many
Skip the second cocktail. When you have an alcoholic drink, you burn less fat, and more slowly than usual, because the alcohol is used as fuel instead. Knocking back the equivalent of about two martinis can reduce your body’s fat-burning ability by up to 73%. (Here’s your body on alcohol in a handy infographic.)

Mistake: You’re not getting enough dairy
“There’s some evidence that calcium deficiency, which is common in many women, may slow metabolism,” says Lakatos. Research shows that consuming calcium through dairy foods such as fat-free milk and low-fat yogurt may also reduce fat absorption from other foods.

Bonus: Here’s a sample calorie-burning day plan:
7 AM: Kick-start your day with yogurt and fruit for breakfast.
10 AM: Your morning java is full of antioxidants.
12 PM: A salad at lunch gives you a healthy dose of fiber.
2 PM: Drink a big glass of water. You need at least 6 to 8 cups a day.
4 PM: Organic grapes make a great snack.
7 PM: Salmon fillets or chicken breasts packs in the protein for dinner.
10 PM: Milk does a body good. Have a glass before bed.
11 PM: Sweet dreams!

Can’t Lose Weight? The 5 Internal Factors That Rule Your Metabolism.


It’s time to get a little more specific about what’s really going on when you have a slow metabolism. It’s not just some theoretical concept. Your metabolism is reflected in your major organ systems, and here are the five major players that affect how you store, burn and lose weight:

1. Your liver

If you were a car, your liver would be like the engine. It is vital and essential to keep you running. Over 600 known metabolic functions happen via the liver, and virtually every nutrient, every hormone, every chemical must be bio-transformed, or made active, by the liver. It’s your work horse.

Your liver creates bile, that powerful solution that breaks down fats and the nitrites and nitrates in your deli meats and bacon. Hormones get secreted from glands all over your body, but it is your liver that breaks down the hormones and makes them biologically active so they can go to work for you.

Your liver influences your electrolyte balance, swelling, dehydration, and water weight. It also acts like a filter for the blood coming through the digestive tract. It converts b-vitamins into coenzymes, and metabolizes nutrients such as proteins, fats, and carbohydrates.

Your liver also manufactures carnitine, which takes fat and escorts it to the mitochondria — your body’s little fat furnaces — in your cells, which influence 90% of your metabolic energy, or your metabolism. The faster and more efficiently you produce carnitine in your liver, the faster and more efficient your metabolism is.

The food you eat must feed your liver, rather than tax it. If you don’t feed your liver appropriately and frequently to stimulate its most efficient functioning, everything else will get disrupted. Because the liver is so closely linked with metabolism, it is one of the most crucial organs to pamper with your diet.

2. Your adrenals

Your adrenals are small glands that lie on top of your kidneys, and they secrete hormones that regulate your body’s response to stress. Your adrenals are responsible for the hormones that allow your body to adapt either functionally or dysfunctionally to changing situations. These hormones determine how you access fuel in your body, and what you do with the fuel or food you consume. Do you store it as fat? Or do you burn it as energy?

Some of the specific hormones the adrenals release include cortisol, adrenaline, and epinephrine. These are released in response to stress, which could be as major as a car accident or as minor as missing a meal. They respond to the acute stress of a disaster or the chronic stress of a bad relationship, an unpleasant work environment, or a taxing family situation.

The secretion of these stress hormones regulates the release of glucose or sugar from the muscle and liver cells, to either stimulate or slow down your body’s metabolic rate. That means this process is nutrient-dependent, or dependent on the food you do or don’t eat. If you nourish your body during times of stress with the right foods, you will not store as much as you burn. When you experience stress, the surge of hormones you experience will be influenced by what you’ve just been eating.

Adrenal exhaustion is a problem we see increasingly often in my clinic, caused by long-term stress and likely also by decreasing food quality and increasing environmental chemicals.

3. Your thyroid

The thyroid is a metabolic superstar! A butterfly-shaped gland located at the center of the throat, I think of the thyroid as your body’s furnace. The pituitary gland is like the thermostat, and the hypothalamus is like the guy controlling the thermostat, but the thyroid is the furnace and the hormones it produces, like T3 and T4, are the heat. When it gets too hot, the thermostat has to be turned down, and when it’s too cold, the thermostat gets cranked up.If any of these three mechanisms aren’t working just right, then the body’s temperature — a direct reflection of metabolism, or the rate at which the body is burning energy — will be off.

The thyroid performs this task via many functions in the body, including the extraction of iodine from food to produce T3 and T4. T3 and T4 travel through the bloodstream and influence the metabolism through the conversion of oxygen and calories to energy. This is what you want — an efficient furnace fueled by food and heating your house so it’s toasty and functional. T3, in particular, is the superhero of a fast metabolism. T3 possess approximately four times the metabolic hormone strength as T4.

But the thyroid has a dark side: a hormone called Reverse T3 (RT3), which is sort of like a misshaped thyroid hormone that isn’t very efficient in stimulating the metabolism, and in fact, blocks healthy T3 functioning. RT3 doesn’t mean to mess things up for you and your plans for those skinny jeans. It’s actually a smart response to prevent starvation. The problem is, when you diet, you know you aren’t starving, but your body doesn’t. In situations where you are experiencing chronic stress, certain disease processes, or nutritional deprivation, RT3 heeds your body’s “Red Alert!” cries, binding the T3 receptor sites and running interference so T3 can’t do its job. RT3 throws a big bucket of water on your metabolic fire, in a panicked effort to save your fat stores so you don’t die from what surely must be a catastrophic famine. The result is that your body quits burning and starts storing.

4. Your pituitary

I think of the pituitary gland as the conductor of the orchestra. It secretes hormones that regulate or conduct the actions of many other hormones in your body. For example, the pituitary stimulates the thyroid to secrete its hormones with thyroid-stimulating hormone, or TSH. If the TSH hormone level is high, that means the thyroid is requiring a lot of motivation or pushing to get its job done (hypothyroid).

If TSH is normal, all the pituitary has to do is speak in a normal voice: Keep up the good work. If TSH is very low, then the thyroid gland may be overactive (hyperthyroid), and the pituitary may only whisper. Of course, as I’ve explained earlier, if the thyroid is producing a lot of fat-storing RT3, the pituitary may perceive this as plenty of thyroid hormone, and may only whisper when it should be yelling. For this reason, a normal thyroid test isn’t necessarily indicative of optimal thyroid function.

5. Your substance

The final key player that directly influences the metabolism is your substance, which is how I refer to the fat and muscle in your body. The body stores the majority of your reserve fuel in either muscle or fat. Because muscle is constantly contracting, relaxing, beating, pushing, and pulling, it takes a lot of fuel to create and maintain it.

There are two types of fat in the body: white fat and brown fat. Brown fat is brown because it is rich in mitochondria, those little parts of the cell that burn fuel and produce energy. The more obese you are, the less brown fat and the more white fat you have. This is just another sick joke on your body, because brown fat burns fuel nine times faster than white fat. White fat is for long-term fat storage, and your body likes to make a Herculean effort to hold on to it.

White fat isn’t all bad. In fact, you need it. White fat is the fat under your skin and around your organs. It is designed to maintain body temperature, protect the organs, and act as an energy storage site for future need. White fat also secretes and regulates hormone output, and these hormones communicate directly with the adrenals, the pituitary, and the hypothalamus.

However, when your metabolism slows down, your body goes into super white-fat production mode, hoarding fat like some people hoard newspapers or shoes or junk mail or stray cats. You can literally be buried alive with all this saved energy, in the form of smothering white fat.

Brown fat is the thermogenic or furnace fat. It actually helps stimulate the metabolism by warming the body, increasing blood flow, and making it easier to deliver nutrients to the white fat. Brown fat helps regulate your cholesterol and triglycerides, transports waste to the intestines for elimination, synthesizes proteins, and stores and metabolizes fatty acids used for energy. Brown fat also metabolizes and stores carbohydrates, storing them as glucose for your red blood cells and brain.

These five major players are the keys to using food to sculpt your body the way you want it. Feeding your liver, soothing your adrenals, maximizing pituitary and thyroid function, and tweaking your fat balance are all part of a balance diet.

Pesticide DDT linked to slow metabolism, obesity and diabetes, mouse study finds.


A new study in mice is the first to show that developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose, and cholesterol.
Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and related conditions in female offspring later in life, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.

The study, published online July 30 in the journalPLOS ONE, is the first to show that developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose, and cholesterol.

DDT was banned in the United States in the 1970s but continues to be used for malaria control in countries including India and South Africa.

Scientists gave mice doses of DDT comparable to exposures of people living in malaria-infested regions where it is regularly sprayed, as well as of pregnant mothers of U.S. adults who are now in their 50s.

“The women and men this study is most applicable to in the United States are currently at the age when they’re more likely to develop metabolic syndrome, because these are diseases of middle- to late adulthood,” said lead author Michele La Merrill, assistant professor of environmental toxicology at UC Davis.

The scientists found that exposure to DDT before birth slowed the metabolism of female mice and lowered their tolerance of cold temperature. This increased their likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome and its host of related conditions.

“As mammals, we have to regulate our body temperature in order to live,” La Merrill said. “We found that DDT reduced female mice’s ability to generate heat. If you’re not generating as much heat as the next guy, instead of burning calories, you’re storing them.”

The study found stark gender differences in the mice’s response to DDT. Females were at higher risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cholesterol, but in males, DDT exposure did not affect obesity or cholesterol levels and caused only a minor increase in glucose levels.

A high fat diet also caused female mice to have more problems with glucose, insulin and cholesterol but was not a risk factor for males. The sex differences require further research, the authors said.

Increase Metabolism .


 

Need another reason to love your body? It burns calories all by itself—as long as you don’t get in the way. See, every cell in your body plays a role in energy metabolism—the process of turning the food you eat into energy that keeps your heart beating, lungs pumping, and muscles moving. The faster your metabolism, the more calories you burn. And just like there are ways to speed it up—by working out, for instance—certain habits can hit the brakes on your natural calorie-churning engine.

 

Here are 10 things to avoid in order to keep your metabolism humming.

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/weight-loss/increase-metabolism

From the desk of Zedie.

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