Ginger tea: Dissolves Kidney Stones, Cleanses Liver & Obliterates Cancer Cells (Recipe)


One of the most health-beneficial plants on earth – ginger, is abundant in medicinal properties, among which it reduces inflammation, stimulates digestion and boosts immunity.

Ginger owes its flavor and aroma to several different essential oils: gingerol, shogaol and zingerone. These agents have really powerful anti-parasitic, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial effects, which can ease pain, improve cardiovascular health, relieve asthma, strengthen immunity, and stimulate digestion among others.

Ginger Tea Benefits

Ginger tea is an amazing remedy for treatment of sore muscles, common cold, flu and headaches. This drink can actually destroy the virus causing influenza, cold sores and common colds.

In addition, only a cup of tea each day can considerably lower your risk of stroke due to the fact that ginger dissolves fat deposits which in fact block the arteries.

Moreover, due to ginger’s thermogenic properties, this vegetable has the ability to improve blood circulation and the delivery of oxygen, minerals and vitamins to the cells in the body.

Plus, the high content of antioxidants successfully eliminates infections and improves the immune system.

Ginger Tea Preparation

Ingredients:

Instructions:
This tea-making process is really simple. After adding the turmeric and ginger in boiling water, lower the heat and then let it simmer for 7-10 min.

Add the coconut milk and strain the tea into a cup. Improve your tea flavor by adding some organic honey. Enjoy one of the healthiest drinks there is!

10 Common Habits That Seriously Damage Your Kidneys


image

Our kidneys are super important for our health. They filter our blood, produce hormones, absorb minerals, produce urine, eliminate toxins, and neutralize acids. So as one of the most important organs in your body, your kidneys deserve some love.

Damage or steady decline of your kidneys can often go unnoticed for years as your kidneys can still do their job with as little as 20% of their capacity. Therefore kidney diseases are often referred to as “The Silent Diseases”. That’s why it is so important to take care of them before it is too late.

Here’s a list of 10 common habits that put a lot of pressure on your kidneys and can cause serious damage over time.

1.    Not Drinking Enough Water

Your kidney’s most important function is to filter blood and eliminate toxins and waste materials. When you don’t drink enough plain water during the day toxins and waste material start to accumulate and can cause severe damage to your body.

2.    Too Much Salt In Your Diet

Your body needs sodium or salt to work properly. Most people however consume too much salt which may raise blood pressure and put a lot of stress on the kidneys. As a good rule of thumb, no more than 5 grams of salt should be eaten on a daily basis.

3.    Frequently Delaying The Call Of Nature

Many of us ignore the urge to go because they are too busy or want to avoid public bathrooms. Retaining urine on a regular basis increases urine pressure and can lead to kidney failure, kidney stones, and incontinence. So listen to your body when nature calls.

4.    Kick The Sugar Habit

Scientific studies show that people who consume 2 or more sugary drinks a day are more likely to have protein in their urine. Having protein in your urine is an early sign your kidneys are not doing their job as they should.

5.    Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies

Eating a clean, whole food diet full of fresh vegetables and fruits is important for your overall health and a good kidney function. Many deficiencies can increase the risk of kidney stones or kidney failure. Vitamin B6 and magnesium, for instance, are super important to reduce the risk of kidney stones.

An estimated 70 to 80 percent of Americans isn’t getting enough magnesium, so there may be a good chance that you are one of them. Click here to learn more about magnesium deficiencies.

6.    Too Much Animal Protein

Over consumption of protein, especially red meat, increases the metabolic load on your kidneys. So more protein in your diet means your kidneys have to work harder and this can lead to kidney damage or dysfunction over time.

7.    Sleep Deprivation

We have all heard how important it is to get a good night’s rest. Chronic sleep deprivation is linked to many diseases and kidney diseases are also on the list. During the night your body repairs damaged kidney tissue, so give your body the time to heal and repair itself.

8.    Coffee Habit

Just as salt, caffeine can raise blood pressure and put extra stress on your kidneys. Over time excessive consumption of coffee can cause damage to your kidneys.

9.    Painkiller Abuse

Way too many people take painkillers for their small aches and pains, while there are many all-natural, safe remedies available. Excessive use or painkiller abuse can lead to severe damage of liver and kidneys.

10.  Alcohol Consumption

Although there is nothing wrong with enjoying a glass of wine or having a beer once in a while, most of us don’t stop after just one drink. Alcohol is actually a legal toxin that puts a lot of stress on our kidneys and liver.

To stay healthy and avoid kidney issues it is important to eat lots of fresh, whole foods and if you keep the above information in mind and avoid these common habits as much as possible, your kidneys will not be under constant stress and your body will thank you for that.

A Health Benefit of Roller Coasters


In a unique, home-spun experiment, researchers found that centripetal force could help people pass kidney stones—before they become a serious health-care cost.

East Lansing, Michigan, becomes a ghost town during spring break. Families head south, often to the theme parks in Orlando. A week later, the Midwesterners return sunburned and bereft of disposable income, and, urological surgeon David Wartinger noticed, some also come home with fewer kidney stones.

Wartinger is a professor emeritus at Michigan State, where he has dealt for decades with the scourge of kidney stones, which affect around one in 10 people at some point in life. Most are small, and they pass through us without issue. But many linger in our kidneys and grow, sending hundreds of thousands of people to emergency rooms and costing around $3.8 billion every year in treatment and extraction. The pain of passing a larger stone is often compared to child birth.

For years in practice, Wartinger noticed anecdotal reports from patients who had passed small kidney stones during and immediately after visiting the Disney theme parks. It was a correlation he might not have noticed in another place, he told me: “This mass migration helped bring it to my attention.”

But one particular gentleman really inspired Wartinger. The man rode Big Thunder Mountain Railroad at Disney’s Magic Kingdom, and then passed a small stone. Then he did it again and passed another. And then another. “That was just too powerful to ignore,” Wartinger said. “I’d been hearing these anecdotal stories for a couple years, and then I thought, okay, there’s really something here.”
The model kidney that Wartinger filled with stones and
urine, then brought on a roller coaster.

If there were a way to make people pass stones while they were still small, Wartinger realized, the potential benefits could be enormous.

So Wartinger compiled people’s stories, and he realized that the common factor was having ridden Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. He found anecdotal reports of people passing stones after bungee jumping, but no research on this bodily-movement approach. So he decided to take things into his own hands and do a proper study.

First, Wartinger used a 3-D printer to create a clear silicone model of that three-time-stone patient’s kidney. He then filled the kidney with stones and urine. (Not real urine, I assumed, as I know the park already has plenty.) Then he and colleague Marc Mitchell bought two tickets and flew to Orlando.

Of course, the researchers had to get permission from Disney World before bringing the model kidney onto the rides. “It was a little bit of luck,” Wartinger recalls. “We went to guest services, and we didn’t want them to wonder what was going on—two adult men riding the same ride again and again, carrying a backpack. We told them what our intent was, and it turned out that the manager that day was a guy who recently had a kidney stone. He called the ride manager and said, do whatever you can to help these guys, they’re trying to help people with kidney stones.”
Other parks, Wartinger says, “have reacted anywhere from lukewarm to really not sure what to do with us.”

The two held the backpack between them “at kidney height” to try to subject the model to the same forces that a person would experience. A stone was counted as “passed” if it moved from a starting location lodged in a calyx and fell down into a trap at the point where the kidney meets the ureters. None of the stones or fluid actually spilled out during the roller coaster ride. (The research protocol notes: “Care was taken to protect and preserve the enjoyment of the other guests at the park.”)

“What was amazing was within just a few rides it became obvious that there was a huge difference in passage rates whether you sat in the front or the rear of the coaster,” Wartinger tells me. “There was a lot more whipping around in that rear car.”

The stones passed 63.89 percent of the time while the kidneys were in the back of the car. When they were in the front, the passage rate was only 16.67 percent. That’s based on only 60 rides on a single coaster, and Wartinger guards his excitement in the journal article: “Preliminary study findings support the anecdotal evidence that a ride on a moderate-intensity roller coaster could benefit some patients with small kidney stones.”

Now, though, he has done more than 200 total stone rides on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. But that doesn’t mean it’s the only coaster that could be therapeutic: “Some rides are going to be more advantageous for some patients than other rides. So I wouldn’t say that the only ride that helps you pass stones is Big Thunder Mountain. That’s grossly inaccurate.”

There are other kidney designs to consider, too, as every person’s calyceal system is different, like a fingerprint. But the idea is that if you rode a variety of roller coasters in a short period of time, that would help you pass small stones and lingering sediment before it accumulates into debilitating, costly, obstructive stones.

Wartinger (G.L. Kohuth / Michigan State University)

Still to know if this works for sure, he’d need a prospective clinical trial using real people with real kidneys. I suggested that would be difficult. He said no, he has it all planned out: Take people with kidney stones and do an ultrasound before the ride and after, and see if the stone moves. Wartinger couldn’t do that right away because universities’ institutional review boards would require experimental evidence to prove the concept first.

This he seems to have done duly on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, with attention to detail. For example, I thought I was just clarifying one such detail when I asked if the “urine” described in the model he brought to Disney was actually water. It was water, right?

“No, it was urine. It was mine.”

I still wasn’t sure if he was serious. I have no problem with urine, it’s just the idea of showing up at Disney with a urine-loaded kidney in your backpack.

“Yeah, I used dilute urine. I spent my life playing in pee. I don’t have that aversion to urine that most people have. The reason I didn’t use water is it would’ve put another variable in there that wasn’t real. So I used real urine … to avoid criticism.”

It seems he thought of everything. Including the fact that people will hear about this study and act on it before it’s validated in human trials. So his advice for now: If you know you have a stone that’s smaller than five millimeters, riding a series of roller coasters could help you pass that stone before it gets to an obstructive size and either causes debilitating colic or requires a $10,000 procedure to try and break it up. And even once a stone is broken up using shock waves, tiny fragments and “dust” remain that need to be passed. The coaster could help with that, too.

For people who hate roller coasters, like a number of people I’ve run this idea by, the ultimate goal would be a more clinical experience—a way to move people in a controlled environment that would help them pass stones organically. Instead of sending people to a theme park, you might go down the hall to a 3-D rollercoaster with a prescription for a precise pattern of pitches, yaws, and rolls designed around your particular kidney anatomy and the location of your particular stone.

Can a Supplement Help Prevent Kidney Stones?


Anyone who’s ever experienced the pain (and sometimes agony) of a kidney stonemay have thought afterward, “Wouldn’t it be great if they came up with something that could prevent that?”

Kidney Stones

Story at-a-glance

  • More than half a million people in the U.S. hit the emergency room for relief from the excruciating pain of kidney stones
  • Fever and chills, bloody and/or cloudy urine and extreme pain in the lower abdominal area are common symptoms
  • Hydroxycitrate, an extract of the Asian garcinia cambogia fruit, is capable, under certain conditions, of dissolving the crystals and inhibiting kidney stone growth
  • The best ways to prevent kidney stones are to drink plenty of water, limit your protein intake and make sure your body has enough magnesium

As is so often the case in science, such visualizations are the same as those of researchers. In this instance, a dietary supplement with the power to dissolve the little troublemakers before they wreak havoc in your system may be the solution.

Researchers at the University of Houston (UH) are calling it a possible “prevention tool.” You may be thinking that if it could actually do that, it might be more like a wonder drug.

Calcium oxylate crystals, which make up the bulk of these minute-but-mighty troublemakers, are essentially hard mineral deposits that form in the kidneys.

The problem starts when they become lodged in your urinary tract and won’t budge. One or more may restrict the flow of urine, causing another level of discomfort. According to MedicineNet.com:

“The calcium oxalate crystals that are the most common component of kidney stones, [are the] mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys. They may get stuck in the urinary tract, blocking urination and causing great pain.”1

If the stone happens to be small, it may pass through your urinary tract unnoticed. But if it’s a large one, it’s not pleasant. Daily Mail reported that in Hungary, the largest kidney stone ever recorded weighed nearly 2.5 pounds.2 Needless to say, larger stones require surgical removal.

Kidney Stone Symptoms

The technical location for kidney stones is the tube that connects your kidney and bladder, called the ureter. When they develop, the previously referenced symptoms3can include:

A persistent urge to urinate Fever and chills (indicating infection) Bloody and/or cloudy urine Pain when urinating
Episodes of pain lasting 20 minutes to an hour Nausea and/or vomiting Pain radiating down your side and back to your groin and lower abdomen

Hydroxycitrate From the Garcinia Cambogia: Possible Kidney Stone Prevention

The study, published in Nature4 in mid-2016, described the development of the kidney stone supplement, an extract of a compound called hydroxycitrate from the Asian garcinia cambogia fruit, also known as Malabar tamarind.

Hydroxycitrate is capable, under certain conditions, of not only dissolving the crystals but also inhibiting their growth. If all goes as they hope, hydroxycitrate would be the most dramatic advance in treating kidney stones in three decades.

Scientists expect the supplement will be a viable alternative to potassium citrate (such as the brand Urocit-K5) which, while it’s effective in relieving kidney stone-passing pain, often includes side effects that rival the misery of what they they’re designed to remedy:

  • Upset stomach
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Cardiac arrest

However, rigorous trials in humans have not yet begun. It’s actually just a concept, so far, but one that makes sense. Jeffrey Rimer, lead study author and associate professor of chemical engineering at UH, said he and his colleagues conducted a combination of studies, some experimental.

Studies Involving Hydroxycitrate

According to Science Daily,6 in studies pitting citrate (CA) against hydroxycitrate (HCA), both inhibited calcium oxalate crystal growth, but the latter was “more potent and displayed unique qualities that are advantageous for the development of new therapies.”

“The team of researchers then used atomic force microscopy, or AFM, to study interactions between the crystals, CA and HCA under realistic growth conditions … the technique allowed them to record crystal growth in real time with near-molecular resolution.

[Jihae] Chung [a UH graduate student who worked on the study] noted that the AFM images recorded the crystal actually shrinking when exposed to specific concentrations of HCA.

 Rimer suspected the initial finding was an abnormality, as it is rare to see a crystal actually dissolve in highly supersaturated growth solutions. The most effective inhibitors reported in the literature simply stop the crystal from growing.”

What Chung saw turned out to be accurate, precipitating the next step: determining how and why the crystals shrank. Two other study authors applied density functional theory (DFT):

” … [A] highly accurate computational method used to study the structure and properties of materials … to address how HCA and CA bind to calcium and to calcium oxalate crystals.

They discovered HCA formed a stronger bond with crystal surfaces, inducing a strain that is seemingly relieved by the release of calcium and oxalate, leading to crystal dissolution.” 7

The next step required that humans be included in the testing, so seven participants took hydroxycitrate for three days, which was long enough for researchers to establish that it was expelled through their urine, one of the requirements for using the supplement as a treatment.

While long-term safety needs to be established, as do dosages and more trials on humans, Rimer believes the initial findings are promising:

“If it works in vivo, similar to our trials in the laboratory, HCA has the potential to reduce the incidence rate of people with chronic kidney stone disease.”8

Giannis Mpourmpakis, Ph.D., another study author and assistant professor of chemical and petroleum engineering at Pittsburgh University’s Swanson School of Engineering, said:

“We were very excited to identify a molecular-level mechanism under which calcium oxalate grows and degrades in its natural environment. Eventually, this will help us control the crystal’s life cycle.”9

Stats on Kidney Stones

The healthiest kidneys function in a number of ways for optimum health. Most importantly, they filter all the blood in your body every half hour, removing waste and excess fluid, according to the National Kidney Foundation.10 They also:

Regulate your fluid levels Activate vitamin D for strong bones Release the hormone for red blood cell production
Keep blood minerals in balance Release a blood-regulating hormone

More than half a million people in the U.S. hit the emergency room for relief from what is often termed excruciating pain from kidney stones. Unfortunately, the condition is becoming more and more prevalent. To date, they affect what’s estimated to be 12 percent of men and 7 percent of women. Harvard Health reports:

“For many, kidney stones aren’t a one-time thing: In about half of people who have had one, another appears within seven years without preventive measures. Most stones occur when calcium combines with one of two substances: oxalate or phosphorous. Stones can also form from uric acid, which forms as the body metabolizes protein.”11

Kidney stones also increase your risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Sobering statistics include:

High blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of kidney disease12 Around 26 million American adults have kidney disease and don’t know it One in 3 American adults are currently at risk13
Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S. Every year, kidney disease kills more people than breast or prostate cancers Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S.
African Americans are 3.5 times more likely to have kidney failure14 Once kidneys fail, either dialysis or a kidney transplant is required In 2013, more than 47,000 Americans died from kidney disease15
Every day, 13 people die waiting for a kidney16

Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones

Most doctors know that one of the most prevalent causes of kidney stones (aka nephrolithiasis) is dehydration, so drinking plenty of water is one of the best ways to prevent their development. Conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity increase the risk.

Another recommendation is to limit your protein intake to one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass, which would place most people in the range of 40 to 70 grams daily (1 1/2 to 2 1/2 ounces). If you’re prone to kidney stones, excess amounts of red meat can be especially problematic because it decreases the levels of citrate, the chemical in urine that helps keep kidney stones from forming in the first place.

Most Americans consume far more protein than they need, which can exacerbate problems with kidney stones. When you consume more protein than your body needs, your body must remove more nitrogen waste products from your blood, which stresses your kidneys.17 Chronic dehydration can result. Doctors also encourage people at risk for kidney stones to pass up foods containing high amounts of oxalate,18 including:

Swiss chard Beets Tea
Sweet potatoes Rhubarb Chocolate
Okra Almonds Spinach

However, these foods contain high amounts of magnesium, which helps prevent calcium from blending with oxalate, the most common kidney stone type. Magnesium is a mineral that has the capacity to prevent kidney stones — if you get enough.

Magnesium deficiency is estimated to affect as much as 80 percent of the American population. It’s been associated with kidney stone development because it plays a part in the way your body handles calcium. Too much calcium can become toxic, so there needs to be a balance.

10 Common Habits That Seriously Damage Your Kidneys


Our kidneys are super important for our health. They filter our blood, produce hormones, absorb minerals, produce urine, eliminate toxins, and neutralize acids. So as one of the most important organs in your body, your kidneys deserve some love.

image

Damage or steady decline of your kidneys can often go unnoticed for years as your kidneys can still do their job with as little as 20% of their capacity. Therefore kidney diseases are often referred to as “The Silent Diseases”. That’s why it is so important to take care of them before it is too late.

Here’s a list of 10 common habits that put a lot of pressure on your kidneys and can cause serious damage over time.

1.    Not Drinking Enough Water

Your kidney’s most important function is to filter blood and eliminate toxins and waste materials. When you don’t drink enough plain water during the day toxins and waste material start to accumulate and can cause severe damage to your body.

2.    Too Much Salt In Your Diet

Your body needs sodium or salt to work properly. Most people however consume too much salt which may raise blood pressure and put a lot of stress on the kidneys. As a good rule of thumb, no more than 5 grams of salt should be eaten on a daily basis.

3.    Frequently Delaying The Call Of Nature

Many of us ignore the urge to go because they are too busy or want to avoid public bathrooms. Retaining urine on a regular basis increases urine pressure and can lead to kidney failure, kidney stones, and incontinence. So listen to your body when nature calls.

4.    Kick The Sugar Habit

Scientific studies show that people who consume 2 or more sugary drinks a day are more likely to have protein in their urine. Having protein in your urine is an early sign your kidneys are not doing their job as they should.

5.    Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies

Eating a clean, whole food diet full of fresh vegetables and fruits is important for your overall health and a good kidney function. Many deficiencies can increase the risk of kidney stones or kidney failure. Vitamin B6 and magnesium, for instance, are super important to reduce the risk of kidney stones.

An estimated 70 to 80 percent of Americans isn’t getting enough magnesium, so there may be a good chance that you are one of them. Click here to learn more about magnesium deficiencies.

6.    Too Much Animal Protein

Over consumption of protein, especially red meat, increases the metabolic load on your kidneys. So more protein in your diet means your kidneys have to work harder and this can lead to kidney damage or dysfunction over time.

7.    Sleep Deprivation

We have all heard how important it is to get a good night’s rest. Chronic sleep deprivation is linked to many diseases and kidney diseases are also on the list. During the night your body repairs damaged kidney tissue, so give your body the time to heal and repair itself.

8.    Coffee Habit

Just as salt, caffeine can raise blood pressure and put extra stress on your kidneys. Over time excessive consumption of coffee can cause damage to your kidneys.

9.    Painkiller Abuse

Way too many people take painkillers for their small aches and pains, while there are many all-natural, safe remedies available. Excessive use or painkiller abuse can lead to severe damage of liver and kidneys.

10.  Alcohol Consumption

Although there is nothing wrong with enjoying a glass of wine or having a beer once in a while, most of us don’t stop after just one drink. Alcohol is actually a legal toxin that puts a lot of stress on our kidneys and liver.

To stay healthy and avoid kidney issues it is important to eat lots of fresh, whole foods and if you keep the above information in mind and avoid these common habits as much as possible, your kidneys will not be under constant stress and your body will thank you for that.

Man Has 420 Kidney Stones Removed In One Operation


A Chinese man, had 420 kidney stones removed from his body. The reason for the kidney stones – tofu.

After the operation, the 55-year old man said that he ate tofu on a daily basis and drank very little water.The doctors said that this is what caused his kidney stones.

Man Has 420 Kidney Stones Removed In One Operation – The Doctor Says His Love Of TofuIs The Reason To Blame

The man went to the doctor, experiencing severe abdominal pain. A CT scan found that his kidney was packed full of stones.

Because the stones left him unable to urinate, the man was booked for an operation immediately.

Dr. Wei, the surgeon who treated the man, said he was surprised by the amount of kidney stones.

“I have never seen so many stones before. The operation took less than two hours, of which 45 minutes were used to remove the stones.” – Said Dr. Wei.

At the end of the operation, the doctor was shocked to see at least 420 kidney stones, in the plate, of varying sizes and colored green and yellow. “At the end of the operation I realized my arms and legs were numb.” – Said Dr. Wen.

“These didn’t include the tiny rice sized stones that were taken out using specialist suction equipment and these numbered over 100.” – He continued.

According to Dr. Wei, bean-based products, often contain a high level of calcium and this can easily lead to kidney stones, as a result of excessive consumption.

Not drinking enough water, causes the calcium to quickly build up inside the body.

The man had previously experienced pain 20 years ago, and was treated for more than 10 kidney stones with lithotripsy. A lithotripsy is a technique that uses shockwaves to break up the stones into small pieces, which are then passed out in urine.

However, during the last two years, the pain he experienced was so unbearable, that in the last two months, he couldn’t be physically active.

His family have said they will make sure that he won’t continue eating tofu in the same volumes as previously.

7 Strategies To Prevent Kidney Stones


how to prevent kidney stones
If you let yourself think about the mechanics of passing a kidney stone for even a minute…wait, just stop. It’s too much! Thankfully, there are several tried-and-true ways to ensure you never have to experience that kind of agony—or at least not have to go through another one. Keep reading for all the ways to prevent a kidney stone. (The Power Nutrient Solution is the first-ever plan that tackles the root cause of virtually every major ailment and health condition today.)

Drink water, then drink some more.
Kidney stones are typically made up of calcium and either phosphate or oxalate, minerals absorbed from food and normally excreted through urine. When urine becomes too concentrated, those minerals can crystallize to form stones. Aim to drink six to eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day to keep your urine diluted. (Add some flavor to your water with one of these 25 sassy water recipes.)

Move it.
A little light exercise can cut your risk by more than 33%, according to a study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Just 3 hours a week spent walking or 1 hour spent jogging changes how your body handles dietary minerals in ways that lower your chances of developing a stone.

MORE: 8 Things That Finally Happen When You Stop Drinking Diet Soda

Swear off soda.

soda and kidney stones

A recent study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital found that people who drink at least one sugar-sweetened soft drink every day have a 23% higher risk of developing kidney stones than those who down fewer than one a week. Why? Fructose increases calcium, oxalate, and uric acid excretion, which contributes to stone formation. (Beat your soda addiction in 1 week with these tips.)

Amp up your calcium intake.
Because kidney stones usually form from calcium, doctors used to think that avoiding this mineral could prevent them. Now they know the opposite is true: Dietary calcium may actually help protect against stones by binding with oxalate in the intestines and preventing it from reaching the kidneys.

Enjoy a morning cup o’ joe.

coffee and kidney stones

People who drank at least one cup of caffeinated coffee had a 26% lower risk of kidney stones, decaf devotees had 16% less risk, and tea drinkers 11% less, according to a study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

MORE: 7 Weird Things Your Teeth Are Trying To Tell You

Look out for this syndrome.
Metabolic syndrome is a serious condition associated with heart attacks, diabetes, and even death. It’s marked by at least three of these five traits: excess abdominal fat, high blood triglycerides, low HDL (good cholesterol), high blood pressure, and impaired glucose tolerance. And it ups your odds of developing kidney stones by 54% if you have two of the aforementioned traits, and 70% if you have three.

Go easy on the protein.
Experts say too much dietary protein can create an ideal environment for kidney stones to flourish. Try to cut back on your meat intake, and keep your Greek yogurt bingeing to a minimum.

Too Much Salt: How A Diet Too High In Sodium Can Affect Your Heart, Brain, And Even Bone Health


salt
Sodium, the main component in table salt, can be detrimental to the body in high quantities. 

Salt has always been of high importance to humanity. In ancient Egypt, salt was an integral part of religious ceremonies, and the Moors in Africa would trade salt pound for pound with gold. Part of our adoration for salt, however, lies in its main ingredient, sodium. (It’s also composed of chloride and iodine sources.) According to the American Heart Association, about 75 percent of the sodium we consume comes not from the salt shaker, but rather in processed and restaurant food.

Our Love Affair With Salt

Sodium is essential to human health. The mineral helps to regulate fluids by letting the body know when it’s time to replenish or dispose of water. Along with that, sodium also maintains nerve transmissions and muscle contractions — functions vital to our survival. As a result, our bodies evolved a desire for sodium akin to addiction to ensure that we never went without enough.

A 2011 Australian study found that the brain responds to sodium similar to how it does for substances such as heroin, cocaine, and nicotine, which may explain why so many of us tend to overindulge in high-sodium foods. Unfortunately, too much of a good thing can actually prove deadly.

Your Brain On Salt

A 2011 Canadian study on 1,200 older sedentary adults with normal brain function found that over the course of three years, high-sodium diets were linked to increased risk of cognitive decline. This result was “independent of hypertension and global diet quality” and “suggests that sodium intake alone may affect cognitive function in sedentary older adults above and beyond the effects of overall diet,” the researchers wrote.

The reason why sodium is detrimental to the brain is not fully understood, but according to Dr. David L. Katz, a researcher involved in the study, physical exercise may be able to protect the brain from the effects of too much salt, Medscape reported.

Kidneys

Sodium plays a key role in balancing the levels of fluid in our bodies by signaling to the kidneys when to retain water and when to get rid of water. A high-sodium diet can interfere with this delicate process and reduce kidney function. The result is less water removed from the body, which may lead to higher blood pressure. As explained by The World Action on Salt and Health, this excess strain on the kidneys can lead to kidney disease or exacerbate kidney problems in those already with the condition.

High-sodium diets may also increase your risk of developing renal stones, also known as kidney stones. The main cause of kidney stones is urinary calcium, a mineral which is noted to increase in those with high-sodium intake.

Bones

Excessive calcium excretion in the urine is believed by some experts to increase the risk of bone thinning. According to WASH, over long periods of time, this excessive calcium loss is associated with osteoporosis, especially in postmenopausal women.

Heart

Due to salt’s fluid retention effect, in some individuals excessive amounts of salt in their diet can lead to high blood pressure. High blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood, and high blood pressure can lead to many serious conditions, such as stroke and heart failure. Although blood pressure increases naturally with age, according to the American Heart Association, reducing your salt intake can help prevent your blood pressure from increasing too much.

Skin

Excessive salt in the diet can cause a symptom known as edema. As reported by Medical News Today, edema is characterized by swelling, particularly in the hands, arms, ankles, legs, andfeet, caused by fluid retention. Excessive salt consumption commonly causes edema; however, the symptom can be caused by a number of other health concerns ranging from menstruation to genetic disposition. Edema is non-life threatening and is a symptom of another underlying health condition, rather than a condition on its own.

While edema may be an extreme symptom of excessive salt consumption, even something as simple as having an extra-large popcorn the night before can leave your skin looking a bit puffier than usual. Dr. Neal B. Schultz, a dermatologist practicing in New York City, told Shapethat susceptibility to swelling due to salt consumption increases with age.

Stomach

A 1996 study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology found that death from stomach cancer in both men and women was closely linked to salt consumption. High salt intake is also associated with stomach ulcers. The reason for this is not completely understood, but one study theorized that the salt may have an adverse effect on the mucous lining of the stomach and cause the stomach tissue to become abnormal and unhealthy, according to Livestrong.

Drinking too much iced tea caused man’s kidney failure, doctors say


Doctors traced an Arkansas man’s kidney failure to an unusual cause – his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day.

This May 21, 2007 file photo shows a glass of iced tea in Concord, N.H. Doctors have traced an Arkansas man's kidney failure to an unusual cause   his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day. He said he drank about 16 8-ounce cups of iced tea every day. Black tea has the chemical oxalate which known to cause kidney stones or even kidney failure in excessive amounts. The man is on dialysis, perhaps for the rest of his life. The case report is in the Thursday, April 2, 2015 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)

They ruled out several potential causes before stumbling on a reason for the 56-year-old man’s kidney problems. He said he drank about 16 8-ounce cups of iced tea every day. Black tea has a chemical known to cause kidney stones or even kidney failure in excessive amounts.

“It was the only reasonable explanation,” said Dr Umbar Ghaffar of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. She and two other doctors describe the case in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine.

The unidentified man went to the hospital last May with nausea, weakness, fatigue and body aches. Doctors determined his kidneys were badly clogged and inflamed by the food chemical called oxalate. The man is on dialysis, perhaps for the rest of his life, Ghaffar said.

Besides black tea, oxalate is found in spinach, rhubarb, nuts, wheat bran and chocolate. In rare cases, too much oxalate can lead to kidney trouble, but often there’s also a contributing intestinal problem. That didn’t seem to be the case for the Arkansas man, and he had no family or personal history of kidney disease.

At 16 cups of iced black tea each day, he was taking in three to 10 times more oxalate than the average American, Ghaffar and her colleagues reported.

Federal studies suggest that, on average, US adults drink a total of 10 or 11 cups of beverages per day – that’s water, coffee and all other liquids combined.

The Arkansas case appears to be very unusual, said Dr Randy Luciano, a Yale School of Medicine kidney specialist who has treated people with kidney damage from too much oxalate.

“I wouldn’t tell people to stop drinking tea,” said Luciano, who was not involved in the research. What the man drank “is a lot of tea.”

THE BEST HERBAL REMEDIES FOR KIDNEY STONES


When the kidneys are not able to process the toxins in the right way, kidney stones will show up, in that case there will be crystallization of the raw minerals. There are some effective herbal remedies for kidney stones.2

Lemon juice, olive oil and apple cider vinegar

One of the most efficient remedies for kidney stones, surely. When you sense the symptoms, use 60 ml of olive oil and 60 ml of lemon juice. After drinking it at once, drink 350 ml of water, and wait for half an hour. After that squeeze half a lemon in 350 ml of water and add a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar. Whisk them well and drink it. Drink this combination every hour until your pain is gone.

Bearberry Tea

If you have problems with kidneys and bladder, this is one of the best natural remedies. Bearberry Tea is reducing infection, cleaning the urinary tract and removing the pain. You should take 500 ml of bearberry tea a day if you have problems with kidney stones.

Horsetail

You can use this efficient remedy if you have kidney stones. Take 3-4 cups of horsetail a day to appease the pain.

Pomegranate Juice

The pomegranate juice and seeds are also very efficient for kidney stones.

Celery

This vegetable has a great effectiveness on the health of the kidneys and the urinary tract. You can use it in a salad, additional ingredient in the meals or drink celery tea.

Basil

Use a basil tea because it’s very good for your kidneys. Also you can use one teaspoon of a composite of basil juice and honey if encountering problems with kidney stones.

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