Scientists study Canadian medicinal plants to explore natural cures for diabetes


Image: Scientists study Canadian medicinal plants to explore natural cures for diabetes

Diabetes is a complex disease that leads to a wide variety of complications, one of the most common of which is diabetic nephropathy (DN) or kidney damage. A team of researchers from Canada sought to identify natural extracts, found in the eastern James Bay area, with potent anti-apoptotic properties that can prevent kidney cell death characteristic of DN. Their study was published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

When it was first recorded in ancient Egypt, diabetes was considered mainly a rare disease. Today, it has exploded into a worldwide epidemic, with about 422 million sufferers on the planet in 2014. The prevalence of the disease is known to be spreading steadily, particularly in mid- to low-income countries.

One of the most dangerous complications of diabetes is DN, which is usually a precursor to kidney failure when left unaddressed. It is just one of the many results of the abnormal apoptotic process that occurs as a result of diabetes.

Apoptosis or cellular death is a natural process that’s essential to the continued balance of the human body. Because of it, old, dysfunctional cells are replaced by new ones. A proof of its importance is how its absence can cause the development of severe diseases, such as cancer.

But as with everything, too much apoptosis is hardly a good thing. In diabetes, the cells go through apoptosis at an abnormal rate. It usually starts with the death of the pancreatic beta cells, the cells responsible for producing the hormone insulin. The insufficiency in insulin results in a jump in blood glucose levels, which leads to more cellular death. Apart from kidney cells, those in the liver and the nervous system are also at a considerable risk.

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DN is one of the most common offshoots of diabetes among the people of the Cree nation in Canada, according to the study’s authors. This has prompted them to look into potential natural treatments that are readily available in the area. They compiled a list of 17 plant species:

  • Balsam fir – Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.
  • Speckled alder – Alnus incana subsp. rugosa (Du Roi) R.T. Clausen
  • Creeping snowberry – Gaultheria hispidula (L.) Muhl.
  • Ground juniper – Juniperus communis L.
  • Sheep Laurel – Kalmia angustifolia L.
  • Tamarack – Larix laricina Du Roi (K. Koch)
  • Common clubmoss – Lycopodium clavatum L.
  • White spruce – Picea glauca (Moench) Voss
  • Black spruce – Picea mariana (P. Mill.) BSP
  • Jack pine – Pinus banksiana Lamb.
  • Balsam poplar – Populus balsamifera L.
  • Labrador tea – Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron and Judd
  • Northern Labrador tea – Rhododendron tomentosum (Stokes) Harmaja subsp. subarcticum (Harmaja) G. Wallace
  • Tealeaf willow – Salix planifolia Pursh
  • Pitcher plant – Sarracenia purpurea L.
  • Showy mountain ash – Sorbus decora (Sarg.) C.K. Schneid.
  • Mountain cranberry – Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.

Extracts were obtained from specific parts of the different plants. The researchers then took cultures of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, which are cells from a cocker spaniel that are used for biological studies involving the kidneys. They induced damage on the MDCK cells by the administration of a hypertonic medium. This particular step was performed in the presence or absence of each of the 17 plant extracts’ maximal nontoxic concentrations. After 18 hours of treatment, the cells were examined to determine the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of the extracts. The researchers then looked at the effect of the treatment on the activity of caspases-3, -8, and -9, all of which play an important role in apoptosis.

After the test, the researchers identified Gaultheria hispidula and Abies balsamea as having the most potent cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects. The said extracts prevented apoptosis by blocking the activity of caspase-9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway.

10 Common Habits That Seriously Damage Your Kidneys


image

Our kidneys are super important for our health. They filter our blood, produce hormones, absorb minerals, produce urine, eliminate toxins, and neutralize acids. So as one of the most important organs in your body, your kidneys deserve some love.

Damage or steady decline of your kidneys can often go unnoticed for years as your kidneys can still do their job with as little as 20% of their capacity. Therefore kidney diseases are often referred to as “The Silent Diseases”. That’s why it is so important to take care of them before it is too late.

Here’s a list of 10 common habits that put a lot of pressure on your kidneys and can cause serious damage over time.

1.    Not Drinking Enough Water

Your kidney’s most important function is to filter blood and eliminate toxins and waste materials. When you don’t drink enough plain water during the day toxins and waste material start to accumulate and can cause severe damage to your body.

2.    Too Much Salt In Your Diet

Your body needs sodium or salt to work properly. Most people however consume too much salt which may raise blood pressure and put a lot of stress on the kidneys. As a good rule of thumb, no more than 5 grams of salt should be eaten on a daily basis.

3.    Frequently Delaying The Call Of Nature

Many of us ignore the urge to go because they are too busy or want to avoid public bathrooms. Retaining urine on a regular basis increases urine pressure and can lead to kidney failure, kidney stones, and incontinence. So listen to your body when nature calls.

4.    Kick The Sugar Habit

Scientific studies show that people who consume 2 or more sugary drinks a day are more likely to have protein in their urine. Having protein in your urine is an early sign your kidneys are not doing their job as they should.

5.    Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies

Eating a clean, whole food diet full of fresh vegetables and fruits is important for your overall health and a good kidney function. Many deficiencies can increase the risk of kidney stones or kidney failure. Vitamin B6 and magnesium, for instance, are super important to reduce the risk of kidney stones.

An estimated 70 to 80 percent of Americans isn’t getting enough magnesium, so there may be a good chance that you are one of them. Click here to learn more about magnesium deficiencies.

6.    Too Much Animal Protein

Over consumption of protein, especially red meat, increases the metabolic load on your kidneys. So more protein in your diet means your kidneys have to work harder and this can lead to kidney damage or dysfunction over time.

7.    Sleep Deprivation

We have all heard how important it is to get a good night’s rest. Chronic sleep deprivation is linked to many diseases and kidney diseases are also on the list. During the night your body repairs damaged kidney tissue, so give your body the time to heal and repair itself.

8.    Coffee Habit

Just as salt, caffeine can raise blood pressure and put extra stress on your kidneys. Over time excessive consumption of coffee can cause damage to your kidneys.

9.    Painkiller Abuse

Way too many people take painkillers for their small aches and pains, while there are many all-natural, safe remedies available. Excessive use or painkiller abuse can lead to severe damage of liver and kidneys.

10.  Alcohol Consumption

Although there is nothing wrong with enjoying a glass of wine or having a beer once in a while, most of us don’t stop after just one drink. Alcohol is actually a legal toxin that puts a lot of stress on our kidneys and liver.

To stay healthy and avoid kidney issues it is important to eat lots of fresh, whole foods and if you keep the above information in mind and avoid these common habits as much as possible, your kidneys will not be under constant stress and your body will thank you for that.

Choosing A Treatment For Kidney Failure.


What happens when your kidneys fail?

Healthy kidneys do many important jobs. They keep your whole body in balance. They remove waste products and extra water from your body, help make red blood cells, and help control blood pressure. When you have kidney failure, it means your kidneys are damaged. They cannot do these important jobs well enough. Having kidney failure means that:

  • 85-90% of your kidney function is gone
  • Your kidneys don’t work well enough to keep you alive

When is treatment needed?

Your doctor will help you decide when you need to start treatment. The decision is based on:

  • Your symptoms
  • Other health problems you have
  • How much kidney function you have left
  • Your nutritional health

When it comes time to choose a treatment for kidney failure, the decision may often be stressful. Learning as much as you can about your options and talking with your healthcare team to choose a treatment plan that’s right for you will help you and your family feel better prepared to make this difficult decision. Each option has different advantages and disadvantages so it is important to learn as much as possible. What might be positive for one person might be a negative for someone else.

How do I know which treatment is right for me?

There are two treatment options for kidney failure: dialysis (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) and kidney transplantation.

Talk with your family so you can decide which treatment will best fit your lifestyle needs. Also you always have the choice to change to a different type of treatment in the future. As your needs and your life change over time, so may your treatment. However, there may be medical reasons why a particular treatment option is not right for you, so talk with your health care team to discuss your personal needs.

What is hemodialysis?

Hemodialysis is a treatment that removes wastes and extra fluid from your blood. It can be done at home or at a dialysis center. During hemodialysis, the blood is pumped through soft tubes to a dialysis machine where it goes through a special filter called a dialyzer (also called an artificial kidney). After your blood is filtered, it is returned to your bloodstream. For more information on hemodialysis, click here.

What is peritoneal dialysis?

In peritoneal dialysis (PD), your blood is cleaned inside your body, not outside your body. The lining of your abdomen (the peritoneum) acts as a natural filter. A cleansing solution flows into your abdomen (your belly) through a soft tube called a PD catheter. Wastes and extra fluid pass from your blood into the cleansing solution. Peritoneal dialysis is a home-based treatment and can be done at home, at work, at school or even during travel. Because of this, peritoneal dialysis may allow for greater flexibility. (For more information on peritoneal dialysis, click here.

What is a kidney transplant?

A kidney transplant is an operation that places a healthy kidney from another person into your body. The kidney may come from someone who has died or from a living donor who may be a close relative, spouse or friend. It can even come from someone who wishes to donate a kidney to anyone in need of a transplant. However, a kidney transplant is a treatment, not a cure, and it is important to care for the new kidney with the same care as before receiving the transplant.

10 Common Habits That Seriously Damage Your Kidneys


Our kidneys are super important for our health. They filter our blood, produce hormones, absorb minerals, produce urine, eliminate toxins, and neutralize acids. So as one of the most important organs in your body, your kidneys deserve some love.

image

Damage or steady decline of your kidneys can often go unnoticed for years as your kidneys can still do their job with as little as 20% of their capacity. Therefore kidney diseases are often referred to as “The Silent Diseases”. That’s why it is so important to take care of them before it is too late.

Here’s a list of 10 common habits that put a lot of pressure on your kidneys and can cause serious damage over time.

1.    Not Drinking Enough Water

Your kidney’s most important function is to filter blood and eliminate toxins and waste materials. When you don’t drink enough plain water during the day toxins and waste material start to accumulate and can cause severe damage to your body.

2.    Too Much Salt In Your Diet

Your body needs sodium or salt to work properly. Most people however consume too much salt which may raise blood pressure and put a lot of stress on the kidneys. As a good rule of thumb, no more than 5 grams of salt should be eaten on a daily basis.

3.    Frequently Delaying The Call Of Nature

Many of us ignore the urge to go because they are too busy or want to avoid public bathrooms. Retaining urine on a regular basis increases urine pressure and can lead to kidney failure, kidney stones, and incontinence. So listen to your body when nature calls.

4.    Kick The Sugar Habit

Scientific studies show that people who consume 2 or more sugary drinks a day are more likely to have protein in their urine. Having protein in your urine is an early sign your kidneys are not doing their job as they should.

5.    Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies

Eating a clean, whole food diet full of fresh vegetables and fruits is important for your overall health and a good kidney function. Many deficiencies can increase the risk of kidney stones or kidney failure. Vitamin B6 and magnesium, for instance, are super important to reduce the risk of kidney stones.

An estimated 70 to 80 percent of Americans isn’t getting enough magnesium, so there may be a good chance that you are one of them. Click here to learn more about magnesium deficiencies.

6.    Too Much Animal Protein

Over consumption of protein, especially red meat, increases the metabolic load on your kidneys. So more protein in your diet means your kidneys have to work harder and this can lead to kidney damage or dysfunction over time.

7.    Sleep Deprivation

We have all heard how important it is to get a good night’s rest. Chronic sleep deprivation is linked to many diseases and kidney diseases are also on the list. During the night your body repairs damaged kidney tissue, so give your body the time to heal and repair itself.

8.    Coffee Habit

Just as salt, caffeine can raise blood pressure and put extra stress on your kidneys. Over time excessive consumption of coffee can cause damage to your kidneys.

9.    Painkiller Abuse

Way too many people take painkillers for their small aches and pains, while there are many all-natural, safe remedies available. Excessive use or painkiller abuse can lead to severe damage of liver and kidneys.

10.  Alcohol Consumption

Although there is nothing wrong with enjoying a glass of wine or having a beer once in a while, most of us don’t stop after just one drink. Alcohol is actually a legal toxin that puts a lot of stress on our kidneys and liver.

To stay healthy and avoid kidney issues it is important to eat lots of fresh, whole foods and if you keep the above information in mind and avoid these common habits as much as possible, your kidneys will not be under constant stress and your body will thank you for that.

Kidney failure impacts survival of sepsis patients


Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection.

In a study published May 20, 2015, in the journal Kidney International, Duke researchers and their colleagues identified physiological changes at the molecular level that might be affected by . The findings could help physicians improve hemodialysis practices, increasing patient survival rates after kidney failure.

Acute kidney injury is a serious and common health complication, occurring in up to 20 percent of all hospitalized and more than 45 percent of patients in a critical-care setting, according to the National Institutes of Health.

“There are a lot of things that we assume to be true about the impact of acute kidney injury on patients,” said lead author Ephraim Tsalik, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor at Duke University School of Medicine. “This study is the first to comprehensively characterize what is happening at the patient level, potentially as a cause and a consequence of acute kidney injury that we see in the setting of .”

Sepsis, which is defined as systemic inflammation resulting from an infection, often results in an abrupt decrease in the kidney’s ability to effectively filter the blood.

The Community Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis Outcome Diagnostic (CAPSOD) study, led by Stephen Kingsmore, M.B, D.Sc., of Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinic, was initially created as a repository for patients visiting the emergency department with suspected sepsis. The researchers used clinical and molecular information generated in the CAPSOD study to correlate patient-level data with changes in molecular markers in the blood.

They found that was a major determinant of how a patient responded to treatment for sepsis.

“We have over 2,000 patients enrolled in the CAPSOD repository,” Tsalik said. “We are trying to use new tools to ask why is it that some patients show up and get sicker, despite getting all the right treatment, and why some patients show up, get the right treatment, and quickly get better.”

Using an “‘omics-based” approach, the researchers looked at variations in metabolite level, protein production, and gene expression in the blood in 150 patients with critical illness. The study design also allowed the researchers to investigate what impact hemodialysis, a medical treatment for that filters toxins from the blood, was having on a variety of molecular markers.

“Rather than setting out to prove existing hypotheses, this study was designed to identify new questions or associations we were not previously aware of,” Tsalik said. “There were a number of things that we expected to see and did, such as the accumulation of molecules normally cleared by the kidney among patients with .”

Those known molecules are usually filtered out when a patient is receiving hemodialysis; however, the researchers also identified other chemicals and metabolites that were not previously shown to be abnormal in patients on hemodialysis.

“It may be that these newly implicated metabolites are not clinically relevant, but by identifying them, we’ve opened up opportunities for researchers to see if they cause toxicity to the patient,” Tsalik said. “We want to understand how to improve the care of patients with acute and those requiring hemodialysis.”

PPIs Linked to Kidney Failure in Seniors


Older patients taking proton pump inhibitors had doubled risk for renal failure. Older patients taking proton pump inhibitors, a common remedy for heartburn and acid reflux, are two times more likely to be hospitalized with kidney failure than peers who don’t take the pills, a study finds.

While the side effect is extremely rare, and the study doesn’t prove the drugs cause kidney failure, the association is worrisome because tens of millions of people a year take these pills, sold by prescription and over-the-counter in some countries, with brand names including Prilosec, Prevacid and Zegerid.

“Generally, the drugs are very well tolerated, and the vast majority of patients who take them will not develop (kidney failure) or other serious problems,” lead study author Tony Antoniou, a researcher at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, said by email. “But the drugs should be used for the shortest possible duration.”

Antoniou and colleagues identified about 290,000 people aged 66 or older taking proton pump inhibitors in Ontario between 2002 and 2011, as well as a similar number of individuals not taking the drugs.

The researchers then looked at how many people were hospitalized for acute kidney injury within 120 days of starting treatment, and compared that to the group not taking the drugs.

In an effort to capture only new users of the drugs, the researchers excluded people from the study who had a prescription for these medicines in the past year. They also excluded people diagnosed in the past five years with illnesses linked to kidney failure such as HIV and lupus. And, they barred people prescribed antibiotics within the last four months because kidney failure can be caused by infections or the drugs used to treat them.

Acute kidney injury occurred in 1,787 people, substantially less than 1% of the total study population. People taking proton pump inhibitors had a hospitalization rate of 13.49 per 1,000 persons per year, compared with 5.46 per 1,000 without the drugs, according to the results online April 16 in CMAJ Open.

“I would not restrict proton pump inhibitors based on this study alone; the overall risk of (kidney failure) in the study population was still quite low and the association with proton pump inhibitors and renal injury is still only an association,” said Dr. John O’Brian Clarke, a gastroenterologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

Of all the possible side effects of these drugs, the most concerning isn’t kidney failure, it’s osteoporosis, Clarke, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. There is also a risk that people won’t absorb certain vitamins and minerals such as magnesium, iron, B12 and calcium.

“This study supports a growing body of literature to suggest that proton pump inhibitor use is not risk-free,” Clarke said. “Clinicians should make every effort to restrict these agents only to patients who truly need proton pump inhibitor therapy and to find the minimum dose and duration of therapy necessary to treat their issues.”

While certain patients may be able to take antacids to relieve symptoms of heartburn, proton pump inhibitors play an important role in treating people with more serious medical problems, Dr. George Sachs, a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, said by email.

For patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, the drugs can prevent the development of life-threatening esophageal cancer, said Sachs, who wasn’t involved in the study.

 Patients should regularly review whether proton pump inhibitors are necessary, said Antoniou.

“In many cases, lifestyle modifications (e.g. avoiding precipitating foods, weight loss) may be all that are required,” he said.

Drinking too much iced tea caused man’s kidney failure, doctors say


Doctors traced an Arkansas man’s kidney failure to an unusual cause – his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day.

This May 21, 2007 file photo shows a glass of iced tea in Concord, N.H. Doctors have traced an Arkansas man's kidney failure to an unusual cause   his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day. He said he drank about 16 8-ounce cups of iced tea every day. Black tea has the chemical oxalate which known to cause kidney stones or even kidney failure in excessive amounts. The man is on dialysis, perhaps for the rest of his life. The case report is in the Thursday, April 2, 2015 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)

They ruled out several potential causes before stumbling on a reason for the 56-year-old man’s kidney problems. He said he drank about 16 8-ounce cups of iced tea every day. Black tea has a chemical known to cause kidney stones or even kidney failure in excessive amounts.

“It was the only reasonable explanation,” said Dr Umbar Ghaffar of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. She and two other doctors describe the case in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine.

The unidentified man went to the hospital last May with nausea, weakness, fatigue and body aches. Doctors determined his kidneys were badly clogged and inflamed by the food chemical called oxalate. The man is on dialysis, perhaps for the rest of his life, Ghaffar said.

Besides black tea, oxalate is found in spinach, rhubarb, nuts, wheat bran and chocolate. In rare cases, too much oxalate can lead to kidney trouble, but often there’s also a contributing intestinal problem. That didn’t seem to be the case for the Arkansas man, and he had no family or personal history of kidney disease.

At 16 cups of iced black tea each day, he was taking in three to 10 times more oxalate than the average American, Ghaffar and her colleagues reported.

Federal studies suggest that, on average, US adults drink a total of 10 or 11 cups of beverages per day – that’s water, coffee and all other liquids combined.

The Arkansas case appears to be very unusual, said Dr Randy Luciano, a Yale School of Medicine kidney specialist who has treated people with kidney damage from too much oxalate.

“I wouldn’t tell people to stop drinking tea,” said Luciano, who was not involved in the research. What the man drank “is a lot of tea.”

Is ESRD Finally on the Decline?


USRDS data show a decline in ESRD incidence for the third year in a row.

  • Medpage Today

New cases of end-stage renal disease in the U.S. have declined for the third year in a row, potentially signaling a downward trend, researchers reported.

There were 114,813 new ESRD patients in 2012 — a 3.7% drop from 2011, according to an analysis of data from the United States Renal and Dialysis System (USRDS).

“Early trends indicate that the ESRD incidence rate may have begun to decrease after having plateaued for many years,” researchers wrote in the report, which was published online.

Rajiv Saran, MD, of the University of Michigan, and director of the USRDS coordinating center, said that while it’s “too soon to declare victory on the war against the rising tide of kidney failure,” their report “provides some good news about kidney disease in the U.S.”

“We will follow these trends closely to see whether they are sustained over the coming years, study what factors may be responsible for bringing about this positive change, and explore how it may be even further accelerated,” he added.

Saran told MedPage Today that some factors that could account for the decline could include earlier detection of chronic kidney disease, better CKD guidelines such as KDOQI, more appropriate referrals to kidney specialists “perhaps as a result of more frequent eGFR reporting by laboratories,” better detection and care of upstream CKD risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension, and better CKD care in general that results in slower disease progression.

Despite the decrease in incidence, 636,905 patients were still being treated for ESRD in 2012 — a 1.3% increase from the prior year.

But the rate of growth of the prevalent ESRD population is slowing, researchers said, with the percentage increases in 2011 and 2012 being the lowest recorded in the last 3 decades.

About 450,000 ESRD patients were being treated with dialysis, while 186,303 had a functioning kidney transplant. There were 17,330 transplants in 2012, including 5,617 from living donors.

And 28,867 patients were added to transplant waiting lists, including both the kidney and kidney/pancreas lists. Nearly 82,000 patients were on the transplant list at the end of 2011, the researchers said.

6 SURPRISING FACTS ABOUT DIABETES AND THE KIDNEYS


Did you know that diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure? Diabetes is a leading risk factor for kidney disease and is characterized by high levels of blood sugar. It occurs when your body does not make enough insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood, or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. High blood sugar levels have a damaging ripple effect in many parts of your body, causing harm to the kidneys. In honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, here are6 surprising facts about diabetes and the kidneys:

  1. Diabetes accounts for 44% percent of new cases of kidney failure and more than 35% of people aged 20 years or older with diabetes have chronic kidney disease. Controlling blood sugar levels is a key factor in protecting the kidneys and preventing or slowing kidney disease. Controlling high blood pressure is also important.
  2. Prediabetes can damage the kidneys. Prediabetes refers to the beginning stage of diabetes also called the precursor stage. At this point, blood sugar levels are not normal, but not quite at the point of having diabetes. Because people with prediabetes often do not experience any physical signs of the disease, regular check-ups are very important. The A1C (A-one-C) test is an abbreviation for hemoglobin A1C. This test measures your average blood glucose over the last 3 months. An A1c test between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates that you may have prediabetes. When a person has prediabetes, it is still possible to reverse the symptoms by losing weight. Changing your diet and exercise habit can make a big difference when it comes to preventing type 2 diabetes and protecting the kidneys!
  3. Protein in the urine is the earliest sign of kidney disease in those with diabetes and prediabetes. It’s easy to detect protein in the urine, but you need to know to look for it. A urine test should be done on an annual basis in all people with diabetes, so ask your healthcare practitioner to check your urine for “albuminuria.” The National Kidney Foundation also offers free kidney health screenings across the country to check for protein in the urine through its KEEP Healthy program. Find KEEP Healthy event near you!
  4. Diabetes injures the small blood vessels in the kidneys. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, the kidneys cannot clean the blood properly and the body will retain more water and salt than it should. This can cause weight gain and ankle swelling, as well as waste materials building up in your blood. Diabetes can also damage blood vessels throughout the body, affecting not only the kidneys, but other organs and tissues such as skin, nerves, muscles, intestines and the heart. Damaged blood vessels can lead to high blood pressure and rapid hardening of the arteries, which can further harm the kidneys.
  5. Diabetes can damage the nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder and the pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that has a high sugar level.
  6. High triglyceride levels place you at increased risk for developing diabetes and prediabetes.Triglycerides are a form of stored fat found in the blood. A test for triglycerides is typically part of the panel you receive to test your cholesterol and other blood lipids. If after a routine blood test, your healthcare practitioner told you that you have high triglycerides, you are at an increased risk for developing diabetes and prediabetes as well as forms of heart disease. High triglycerides are also common in those with kidney disease, so this blood test should be on your radar.

N-acetylcysteine attenuates the progression of chronic renal failure


Background

 

Lipid peroxidation impairs renal function. Aldosterone contributes to renal injury in the remnant kidney model. This study aimed to determine the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on renal function and aldosterone levels in chronic renal failure.

Methods

 

Adult male Wistar rats were submitted to 5/6 nephrectomy or laparotomy (sham-operated) and received NAC (600 mg/L in drinking water, initiated on postoperative day 7 or 60), spironolactone (1.5 g/kg of diet initiated on postoperative day 7), the NAC-spironolactone combination or no treatment. Clearance studies were performed on postoperative days 21, 60, and 120.

Results

 

Mean daily NAC and spironolactone ingestion was comparable among the treated groups. Mean weight gain was higher in NAC-treated rats than in untreated rats. A significant decrease in urinary thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations, a lipid peroxidation marker, was observed in NAC-treated rats. By day 120, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which dropped dramatically in untreated rats, was stable (albeit below normal) in NAC-treated rats, which also presented lower proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis index, and blood pressure, together with attenuated cardiac and adrenal hypertrophy. These beneficial effects, observed even when NAC was initiated on postnephrectomy day 60, were accompanied by a significant reduction in plasma aldosterone and urinary sodium/potassium ratio. The NAC-spironolactone combination lowered blood pressure and improved GFR protection.

Conclusion

 

The NAC-spironolactone combination improves renal function more than does NAC alone. In the remnant kidney model, early or late NAC administration has a protective effect attributable to decreased plasma aldosterone and lower levels of lipid peroxidation.

CONCLUSION

Our data demonstrate that NAC attenuates drops in GFR, as well as lowering proteinuria and blood pressure in nephrectomized rats. This is accompanied by a significant reduction in aldosterone levels. Our results indicate that ROS play an important role in the progression of chronic renal failure. It is evident that NAC has potential utility in preventing glomerulosclerosis and loss of kidney function in patients with chronic renal failure. The findings that NAC attenuated GFR drop and lowered proteinuria, even in end-stage chronic renal failure, and that the combination of NAC and spironolactone improves renal function more than does NAC alone have significant clinical implications.

Source: Nature Kidney