Most Compelling Reasons to Get a VPN for Your iPhone and iPad


Between hackers, government entities, and snoopy tech giants, there is no shortage of of threats to your online security and privacy. Luckily, there’s a quick and easy solution that can help mitigate some of these threats: a VPN. Find the best VPNs here.

A VPN, or virtual private network, essentially allows you to browse the internet anonymously while keeping your data safe. And you can use them on pretty much all of your smart devices — including your iPhone and iPad. See best VPNs for iPad and iPhone.

 

Top Reasons to Use a VPN on an iOS Device

  1. It’ll keep your data safe. If there’s one thing to remember about using a VPN, it’s this: it’s a simple way to significantly boost your cybersecurity. VPNs will apply end-to-end encryption to all of your internet traffic, meaning that sensitive data can’t be intercepted.
  2. It allows you to unlock geo-restricted content. VPNs are, arguably, most commonly used to bypass geographic restrictions on content like Netflix shows. Essentially, you’ll be able to access content that’s restricted to a different region.
  3. It increases your privacy. If you don’t want your carrier or internet service provider (ISP) in your business, get a VPN. Because your browsing data is encrypted, ISPs and carriers won’t be able to know what you’re up to on your device.
  4. It lets you use public Wi-Fi safely. Public Wi-Fi is handy — but it’s also incredibly unsecure. Normally, we recommend staying away from anything sensitive when you’re using public Wi-Fi. But a VPN encrypts your data, so you can have peace of mind on that unsecured network.
  5. It’ll help you become anonymous. A VPN will boost your internet privacy — but it’ll also make you more anonymous overall. Advertisers and government agencies alike will be much less likely to connect your browsing history to your identity.
  6. You can access secure content remotely. If you ever need to access a sensitive corporate server while on-the-road, a VPN will help you established a secure connection. That way, you aren’t risking your businesses’ sensitive data.
  7. Get around internet censorship. Similar to geographic restrictions, certain regions around the world will block popular websites like Facebook or YouTube. A VPN can help you get around those “great firewalls” if you’re traveling internationally.
  8. If you torrent, it’ll help. We don’t advocate for doing anything illegal, but if you use torrenting software, a VPN will come in handy. Even users who only download legal torrents will often find their torrenting apps getting throttled.
  9. They often come with bonus features. While they aren’t the main draw, most VPNs also come with additional features like built-in firewalls and more.
  10. There’s no reason not to. If you choose a good-quality VPN with solid performance and a no-log policy, there’s really no downside to using a VPN. The most popular VPNs are also extremely easy to set up and use on your iOS device.

In Other Words, Get One

All of this is to say that using a VPN on your iPhone and iPad is kind of a no-brainer; especially if you value your online privacy and cybersecurity. Just make sure to do your research, avoid free VPNs, and make sure to get a good-quality VPN from a reputable company. Here are the top VPNs we recommend.

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Apple Releases Mysterious iOS 12.1.2 Update After Just ONE Beta


Ios 12 1 21

Apple has released iOS 12.1.2 to the public, just about a week after the first beta became available for developers and software testers.

The update is a relatively light one. According to Apple’s release notes..

It fixes a bug impacting eSIM activation for the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max and iPhone XR.

It also addresses an issue that affected cellular connectivity in specific regions.

eSIM activations are now available from AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile as of the writing of this article. Once users download iOS 12.1.2, they shouldn’t experience any bugs with eSIM activations.

But while iOS 12.1.2 is a minor update, it is fairly unusual. Apple typically doesn’t rush a software update out after just one beta version.

Presumably, iOS 12.1.2 contains a fix that Apple opted not to wait to address.

As far as what that might be, it could be anyone’s guess. But it’s worth noting that iOS 12.1.2 lines up with a previously planned software update from Apple.

What’s Really Going on Here?

Last week, Chinese courts placed an import ban on certain iPhones due to an alleged violation of two Qualcomm patents.

Apple, in response, said it would release a software update that addresses any concerns about its devices violating those patents.

While iOS 12.1.2’s release notes don’t mention anything, its launch on Monday does certainly correlate with that timing.

Interestingly, the iOS 12.1.2 update is only available on iPhone — not on iPad or iPod touch. That further suggests that it could be related to the previously announced update.

But it’s also a bit confusing since reports suggested that iOS 12.1.2 also fixed a bug on iPad Pro. That could hint that an iPad and iPod touch version of the software may be on its way, or that the bug fix will be implemented in a future update.

How Do I Get It?

iPhone users can download it over-the-air by going to Settings > General > Software Update.

Why Feds Can Unlock Your iPhone with Face ID (But Not Your Password)


For the first time in the world, law enforcement officials have used Apple’s Face ID security system to unlock a suspect’s iPhone. FBI officials armed with a search warrant forced Ohio resident Grant Michalski, who was charged with possessing child pornography, to put his face to his iPhone in order to unlock it, allowing them to investigate its contents.

Fbi Police Face Id Touch Id Passwords

This case has led to questions about the legality of the cops’ actions. Typically, the Fifth Amendment protects US citizens from self-incrimination, which prevents law enforcement from forcing suspects to provide information like the passwords to their devices. Federal officials have had difficulty obtaining passwords because of this.

Even Apple cannot provide passwords to users’ devices and it has refused to build a loophole into its security. This led to a highly publicized legal clash between the iPhone maker and the FBI in 2016 over Apple’s refusal to help the agency decrypt the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone. The FBI eventually hired a third-party Israeli firm Cellebrite to unlock it.

“Big picture, a warrant is required for the search of a device except in certain circumstances at the border,” said Greg Nojeim, director at the Center for Democracy & Technology, to Wired.

But the protections may not extend to fingerprints and face identification, which courts have not yet defined as self-incriminating testimony.

“For the issue about whether you can be compelled to provide your fingerprint or your face, so far the courts are ruling that fingerprints and faces are not testimonial, and therefore there isn’t a Fifth Amendment violation,” Nojeim said. “In terms of whether compelled disclosure of a password is a violation of the Fifth Amendment, the majority of courts are saying it is.”

This distinction has led to a bunch of cases in which federal agents have been authorized to force suspects to unlock phones using biometric identification.

In 2016, police were authorized to search a property in Lancaster, California and “depress the fingerprints and thumbprints of every person who is located” within the premises.

And now, with the proliferation of facial identification, police have an even less intrusive means of unlocking phones and accessing all the information contained within.

“It’s not at all surprising to me that this happened. In fact, it seems as though Face ID opens up less invasive ways for police officers who have authority to access data on a phone,” said Boston University law professor Ahmed Ghappour, regarding the Michalski case. “There might be less intrusion and physical coercion with forcing a faceprint versus a fingerprint.”

The Supreme Court has not yet weighed in on whether suspects are protected against compelled biometric decryption, so it is possible that such measures will be ruled violations of the Fifth Amendment in the future. In such a case, the question could hinge on whether your face qualifies as a piece of knowledge.

“Arguably if law enforcement says use your finger to unlock, the knowledge of which finger [will unlock an iPhone] is still an item of knowledge being produced by the individual,” attorney Fred Jennings explained to Forbes “Whereas with Face ID, by design it will only unlock with a very specific and obvious and body part.”

In lieu of biometric decryption, however, federal agents have developed other means of breaking into devices using third-party software and hardware like Cellebrite and Graykey, a relatively cheap service that can reportedly unlock two iPhones in minutes. This may spur tech companies like Apple to adopt even stronger security protocols to close loopholes.

In any case, the best form of security seems to be keeping a strong six-digit password on your iPhone.

Do Cellphones Cause Cancer?


The question of whether cellphones can cause cancer became a popular one after the dramatic increase in cell phone use since the 1990s. Scientists’ main concern is that cell phones can increase the risk of brain tumors or other tumors in the head and neck area – and as of now, there doesn’t seem to be a clear answer.

Cell phones give off a form of energy known as radiofrequency (RF) waves. They are at the low-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum – as opposed to the higher-energy end where X-rays exist – and they emit a type of non-ionizing radiation. In contrast to ionizing radiation, this type does not cause cancer by damaging DNA in cells, but there is still a concern that it could cause biological effects that result in some cancers.

However, the only consistently recognizable biological effect of RF energy is heat. The closer the phone is to the head, the greater the expected exposure is. If RF radiation is absorbed in large enough amounts by materials containing water, such as food, fluids, and body tissues, it produces this heat that can lead to burns and tissue damage. Still, it is unclear whether RF waves could result in cancer in some circumstances.

An iPhone.

Many factors affect the amount of RF energy a person is exposed to, such as the amount of time spent on the phone, the model of the phone, and if a hands-free device or speaker is being used. The distance and path to the nearest cell phone tower also play a role. The farther a way a person is from the tower, the more energy is required to get a good signal on the phone. The same is true of areas where many people are using their phones and excess energy is required to get a good signal.

RF radiation is so common in the environment that there is no way to completely avoid it. Most phone manufacturers post information about the amount of RF energy absorbed from the phone into the user’s body, called the specific absorption rate (SAR), on their website or user manual. Different phones have different SARs, so customers can reduce RF energy exposure by researching different models when shopping for a phone. The highest SAR in the U.S. is 1.6 watts/kg, but actual SAR values may vary based on certain factors.

Studies have been conducted to find a possible link between cell phone use and the development of tumors. They are fairly limited, however, due to low numbers of study participants and risk of recall bias. Recall bias can occur when individuals who develop brain tumors are more predisposed to recall heavier cell phone use than those who do not, despite lack of true difference. Also, tumors can take decades to develop, and given that cell phones have only been in use for about 20 years, these studies are unable to follow people for very long periods of time. Additionally, cell phone use is constantly changing.

Outside of direct studies on cell phone use, brain cancer incidence and death rates have changed little in the past decade, making it even more difficult to pinpoint if cell phone use plays a role in tumor development.

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Pump Vacation’s End


lantus

When my Lantus pen finally neared empty after my evening dose on Wednesday, I knew that I was just about ready to reconnect to my insulin pump.

It’s been almost a month since I started this pump break and it’s been just what I’ve needed to clear my head and feel a little more “free” from my diabetes.

But I’m also beginning to feel a little over the effort required to physically inject my insulin, moreso at this time of the year.

When I was in the comfort of my own home with all the time in the world to spare, injecting wasn’t really a big deal. But when I was on the go and short of time, I was really starting to miss the convenience that wearing an insulin pump allowed me.

I really had to make a big point of injecting before I could go and have my morning tea or lunch. This meant finding a place where I wouldn’t be disturbed, pulling out my iPhone, opening up the RapidCalc app, calculating my insulin dose and then concentrating on actually injecting it.

Concentrating?

Yep, concentrating.

If I didn’t put all of my focus towards the task of actual injecting, I ended up with those annoying little drops that manifested on the end of my insulin pen. I was left wondering how much insulin actually went in, shooting out half a unit to compare while deliberating over whether or not I should top up.

In case you’re wondering, there is a technique to avoid this. Gently lift the skin beneath your injection site (don’t pinch), inject your insulin, hold the pen in for 15 seconds after the injection, release the skin and then pull the needle out. I’m not sure I’ve quite mastered it yet, but I have successfully revealed a few clean needles by using this technique.

Then there was the effort required to swap out blunt needles. Because they sure did hurt when I forgot to change them.

Injecting is a lot of effort to put in during my break when I really want to be savoring my coffee and Walkers Shortbread. Or when I’m in the car, trying to give a quick correction in between traffic light changes. Also in the middle of the night, when I actually have to switch on my lamp and physically get up out of bed to make sure I properly administer my correction dose.

I fully get that these are all first world problems and I’m super grateful that I have the luxury and choice to choose the style of management that suits my needs.

On Wednesday evening before bed, I inserted a fresh pump site on my left side and loaded a fresh insulin cartridge. When I woke up on Thursday morning, I skipped my morning dose of Lantus and clipped my pump line into the clean infusion site on my hip. I rode out the day as the rest of my Lantus tapered off. By 3:30 p.m. I thought I could safely switch my basal rate back on and I was pumping insulin once again.

The smartphone is eventually going to die, and then things are going to get really crazy.


One day, not too soon – but still sooner than you think – the smartphone will all but vanish, like beepers and fax machines before it.

Make no mistake, we’re still probably at least a decade away from any kind of meaningful shift away from the smartphone. (And if we’re all cyborgs by 2027 , I’ll happily eat my words. Assuming we’re still eating at all, I guess.)

Yet, piece by piece, the groundwork for the eventual demise of the smartphone is being laid by Elon Musk , by Microsoft, by Facebook, by Amazon, and a countless number of startups that still have a part to play.

And, let me tell you: If and when the smartphone does die, that’s when things are going to get really weird for everybody. Not just in terms of individual products, but in terms of how we actually live our everyday lives and maybe our humanity itself.

Here’s a brief look at the slow, ceaseless march towards the death of the smartphone – and what the post-smartphone world is shaping up to look like.

The short term

People think of the iPhone and the smartphones it inspired as revolutionary devices – small enough to carry everywhere, hefty enough to handle an increasingly large number of our daily tasks, and packed full of the right mix cameras and GPS sensors to make apps like Snapchat and Uber uniquely possible.

But consider the smartphone from another perspective. The desktop PC and the laptop are made up of some combination of a mouse, keyboard, and monitor. The smartphone just took that model, shrunk it down, and made the input virtual and touch-based.

So take, for example, the Samsung Galaxy S8 , unveiled this week. It’s gorgeous with an amazing bezel-less screen and some real power under the hood. It’s impressive, but it’s more refinement than revolution.

Samsung Galaxy S8

Tellingly, though, the Galaxy S8 ships with Bixby , a new virtual assistant that Samsung promises will one day let you control every single feature and app with just your voice. It will also ship with a new version of the Gear VR virtual reality headset, developed in conjunction with Facebook’s Oculus.

The next iPhone, too, is said to be shipping with upgrades to the Siri assistant, along with features aimed at bringing augmented reality into the mainstream .

And as devices like the Amazon Echo , Sony PlayStation VR , and theApple Watch continue to enjoy limited but substantial success, expect to see a lot more tech companies large and small taking more gambles and making more experiments on the next big wave in computing interfaces.

The medium term

In the medium-term, all of these various experimental and first-stage technologies are going to start to congeal into something familiar, but bizarre.

Microsoft, Facebook, Google and the Google-backed Magic Leap are all working to build standalone augmented reality headsets, which project detailed 3D images straight into your eyes. Even Apple is rumored to be working on this, too .

Microsoft’s Alex Kipman recently told Business Insider that augmented reality could flat-out replace the smartphone, the TV, and anything else with a screen. There’s not much use for a separate device sitting in your pocket or on your entertainment center, if all your calls, chats, movies, and games are beamed into your eyes and overlaid on the world around you.

apple airpods in ear

Meanwhile, gadgetry like the Amazon Echo or Apple’s own AirPodsbecome more and more important in this world. As artificial intelligence systems like Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Samsung’s Bixby, and Microsoft’s Cortana get smarter, there’s going to be a rise not just in talking to computers, but having them talk back.

In other words, computers are going to hijack your senses, more so than they already do, with your sight and your hearing intermediated by technology. It’s a little scary. Think of what Facebook glitches could mean in a world where it doesn’t just control what you read on your phone, but what you see in the world around you .

The promise, though, is a world where real life and technology blend more seamlessly. The major tech companies promise that this future means a world of fewer technological distractions and more balance, as the physical and digital world become the same thing. You decide how you feel about that.

The really crazy future

Still, all those decade-plus investments in the future still rely on gadgetry that you have to wear on you, even if it’s only a pair of glasses. Some of the craziest, most forward-looking, most unpredictable advancements go even further – provided you’re willing to wait a few extra decades, that is.

This week, we got our first look at Neuralink, a new company cofounded by Elon Musk with a goal of building computers into our brains by way of “neural lace,” a very early-stage technology that lays on your brain and bridges it to a computer. It’s the next step beyond even that blending of the digital and physical worlds, as man and machine become one.

Assuming the science works – and lots of smart people believe that it will– this is the logical endpoint of the road that smartphones started us on. If smartphones gave us access to information and augmented reality puts that information in front of us when we need it, then putting neural lace in our brains just closes the gap.

Ray Kurzweil

Musk has said that this is because the rise of artificial intelligence – which underpins a lot of the other technologies, including voice assistants and virtual reality – means that humans are going to have to augment themselves just to keep up with the machines. If you’re really curious about this idea, futurist Ray Kurzweil is the leading voice on the topic .

The idea of man/machine fusion is a terrifying one, with science fiction writers, technologists, and philosophers alike having very good cause to ask what even makes us human in the first place. At the same time, the idea is so new that nobody really knows what this world would look like in practice.

So if and when the smartphone dies, it’ll actually be the end of an era in more ways than one. It’ll be the end of machines that we carry with us passively and the beginning of something that bridges our bodies straight into the ebb and flow of digital information. It’s going to get weird.

And yet, lots of technologists already say that smartphones give us superpowers with access to knowledge, wisdom, and abilities beyond anything nature gave us. In some ways, augmenting the human mind would be the ultimate superpower. Then again, maybe I’m just an optimist.

Make no mistake, we’re still probably at least a decade away from any kind of meaningful shift away from the smartphone. (And if we’re all cyborgs by 2027 , I’ll happily eat my words. Assuming we’re still eating at all, I guess.)

Yet, piece by piece, the groundwork for the eventual demise of the smartphone is being laid by Elon Musk , by Microsoft, by Facebook, by Amazon, and a countless number of startups that still have a part to play.

And, let me tell you: If and when the smartphone does die, that’s when things are going to get really weird for everybody. Not just in terms of individual products, but in terms of how we actually live our everyday lives and maybe our humanity itself.

Here’s a brief look at the slow, ceaseless march towards the death of the smartphone – and what the post-smartphone world is shaping up to look like.

The short term

People think of the iPhone and the smartphones it inspired as revolutionary devices – small enough to carry everywhere, hefty enough to handle an increasingly large number of our daily tasks, and packed full of the right mix cameras and GPS sensors to make apps like Snapchat and Uber uniquely possible.

But consider the smartphone from another perspective. The desktop PC and the laptop are made up of some combination of a mouse, keyboard, and monitor. The smartphone just took that model, shrunk it down, and made the input virtual and touch-based.

So take, for example, the Samsung Galaxy S8 , unveiled this week. It’s gorgeous with an amazing bezel-less screen and some real power under the hood. It’s impressive, but it’s more refinement than revolution.

Samsung Galaxy S8

Tellingly, though, the Galaxy S8 ships with Bixby , a new virtual assistant that Samsung promises will one day let you control every single feature and app with just your voice. It will also ship with a new version of the Gear VR virtual reality headset, developed in conjunction with Facebook’s Oculus.

The next iPhone, too, is said to be shipping with upgrades to the Siri assistant, along with features aimed at bringing augmented reality into the mainstream .

And as devices like the Amazon Echo , Sony PlayStation VR , and theApple Watch continue to enjoy limited but substantial success, expect to see a lot more tech companies large and small taking more gambles and making more experiments on the next big wave in computing interfaces.

The medium term

In the medium-term, all of these various experimental and first-stage technologies are going to start to congeal into something familiar, but bizarre.

Microsoft, Facebook, Google and the Google-backed Magic Leap are all working to build standalone augmented reality headsets, which project detailed 3D images straight into your eyes. Even Apple is rumored to be working on this, too .

Microsoft’s Alex Kipman recently told Business Insider that augmented reality could flat-out replace the smartphone, the TV, and anything else with a screen. There’s not much use for a separate device sitting in your pocket or on your entertainment center, if all your calls, chats, movies, and games are beamed into your eyes and overlaid on the world around you.

apple airpods in ear

Meanwhile, gadgetry like the Amazon Echo or Apple’s own AirPodsbecome more and more important in this world. As artificial intelligence systems like Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Samsung’s Bixby, and Microsoft’s Cortana get smarter, there’s going to be a rise not just in talking to computers, but having them talk back.

In other words, computers are going to hijack your senses, more so than they already do, with your sight and your hearing intermediated by technology. It’s a little scary. Think of what Facebook glitches could mean in a world where it doesn’t just control what you read on your phone, but what you see in the world around you .

The promise, though, is a world where real life and technology blend more seamlessly. The major tech companies promise that this future means a world of fewer technological distractions and more balance, as the physical and digital world become the same thing. You decide how you feel about that.

The really crazy future

Still, all those decade-plus investments in the future still rely on gadgetry that you have to wear on you, even if it’s only a pair of glasses. Some of the craziest, most forward-looking, most unpredictable advancements go even further – provided you’re willing to wait a few extra decades, that is.

This week, we got our first look at Neuralink, a new company cofounded by Elon Musk with a goal of building computers into our brains by way of “neural lace,” a very early-stage technology that lays on your brain and bridges it to a computer. It’s the next step beyond even that blending of the digital and physical worlds, as man and machine become one.

Assuming the science works – and lots of smart people believe that it will– this is the logical endpoint of the road that smartphones started us on. If smartphones gave us access to information and augmented reality puts that information in front of us when we need it, then putting neural lace in our brains just closes the gap.

Ray Kurzweil

Musk has said that this is because the rise of artificial intelligence – which underpins a lot of the other technologies, including voice assistants and virtual reality – means that humans are going to have to augment themselves just to keep up with the machines. If you’re really curious about this idea, futurist Ray Kurzweil is the leading voice on the topic .

The idea of man/machine fusion is a terrifying one, with science fiction writers, technologists, and philosophers alike having very good cause to ask what even makes us human in the first place. At the same time, the idea is so new that nobody really knows what this world would look like in practice.

So if and when the smartphone dies, it’ll actually be the end of an era in more ways than one. It’ll be the end of machines that we carry with us passively and the beginning of something that bridges our bodies straight into the ebb and flow of digital information. It’s going to get weird.

And yet, lots of technologists already say that smartphones give us superpowers with access to knowledge, wisdom, and abilities beyond anything nature gave us. In some ways, augmenting the human mind would be the ultimate superpower. Then again, maybe I’m just an optimist.

Source:businessinsider.in

Why you should hold your iPhone in your right hand to make phone calls 


Why you shouldn't hold your iPhone in your left hand to make phone calls

If you hold your iPhone in your left hand to make calls, you might want to reconsider.

A study has shown that the way you hold the phone can affect signal strength, and that it becomes weaker when held in the left.

Some other brands are affected by different hands too, but Apple is the company that it really seems to make an impact for.

Look at this table, via Quartz:

pic - ATLAS/Data: Gert Frølund Pedersen/Aalborg University Why you should hold your iPhone in your right hand to make phone calls

The results come from the Nordic Council of Ministers, investigating how well different phones picked up and transmitted radio signals.

Apple’s new iPhone 7, which was released this week, wasn’t part of the study.

Maybe in that place where the headphone jack used to be, they might have sorted it out?

Otherwise, just stick to the hands free maybe.

If You Chose An iPhone Over An Android, Science Says You’re Probably Obnoxious


So, I have an iPhone — because I’m a civilized human being and I like feeling and looking like I’m in the future — but apparently, people who buy Androids are, on average, allegedly more honest and humble than their iPhone-owning counterparts.

Pretty Little Liars Texting

A study conducted by Heather Shaw from the University of Lincoln’s School of Psychology took a look at hundreds of smartphone users to see if they shared any traits.

Not only did they find that the Android users surveyed were generally more honest and humble, but that iPhone users were also more extroverted and more likely to be concerned with status.

Now it isn’t all that surprising that iPhone users would be more concerned with status than Android users. After all, iPhone’s are 1) more expensive and 2) were, for a long time, generally considered the middle-class norm in the smartphone market, so to decide to choose an Android meant that you had to be at least moderately less concerned with this weird technological signifier of middle-class status.

Of course, Android phones are also expensive, so the differences here are slight, but, intuitively, the status distinction noticed in this study makes sense, at least to me.

As Shaw explains,

It is becoming more and more apparent that smartphones are becoming a mini digital version of the user, and many of us don’t like it when other people use our phones because it can reveal so much about us.

Shaw and her researchers hope, as our technology integrates itself even deeper into our lives (is that even possible), to further study the ways in which the choices we make on our phones reflect what we want and who we want to be.

Dot Physics The Physics of Wireless Charging


What if you could charge your phone (or device) without having to worry about the charging cable? Well, you can. This is the idea behind wireless charging. In short, you place your device on some type of pad and then phone gets power without a wire (as long as the phone also supports wireless charging). That’s where they get the term “wireless charging” – you know…because there are no wires.

Magnets and Wires

Let’s start with a very simple demonstration. Here I have a coil of wire connected to a Galvanometer. I could write a whole post on just the Galvanometer, but for now I will just say that it measures electric current. Inside the red coil I am holding a very strong magnet.

Summer 14 Sketches key

If I just hold the magnet inside the coil, nothing happens. However, if I move the magnet either in or out of the coil I get a current.

Wireless

This is all about changing magnetic flux. Yes, just like a “flux capacitor” even though that isn’t a real thing. You can have flux for all sorts of things. My favorite flux to use as an example is rain flux. This is simply the rate that falling rain hits some area – let’s say it’s a sheet of paper.

Summer 14 Sketches key

There are three things you could change that would also change this “rain flux”. First, you could change how much it rains. If the rain comes down faster of course more water will hit the paper (note – real rain drops aren’t shaped like that). Second, you could change the angle between the paper and the rain. Third, you could change the area of paper. That’s rain flux.

We can do the exact same thing with the magnetic field. Guess what we call this? Yes, it’s called the magnetic flux. This magnetic flux depends on the strength of the magnetic field, the angle between the field and the area and the size of the area.

Summer 14 Sketches key

The curved lines are representations of the magnetic field from the magnet.

Here is the physics part. When you change the magnetic flux, you create an electric field inside the wire. This electric field then makes an electric current and electric currents can recharge your phone. Remember, CHANGE in flux is the important part. Actually, you could just use a spinning magnet and a coil of wire and make as much electricity as you want. In fact, this is exactly what happens with a gasoline powered generator. Oh, it’s also how a nuclear power plant makes electricity (the nuclear reactions just turn water to steam and the steam turns a turbine).

Magnetic Flux Without Magnets

The wireless chargers don’t have magnets in them. If you place a wire with current over a magnetic compass you can see that these currents also make magnetic fields.

The Physics of the Railgun   Science Blogs   Wired

If you replace a moving magnet with a wire that has alternating current, you are all set. The changing electric current in one wire makes a changing magnetic field. This changing magnetic field then induces an electric current in another loop. Also, the more loops you have (in both coils of wires) the greater the effect. Here is simplest version of wireless charging.

mpeg_streamclip_1_9_3b_7_c_2004_2011_squared_5

On the bottom is a huge coil of wire. This wire is then attached to a household style plug. Yes, it’s just a loop of wire with a plug on the end. When you plug this thing into the outlet, electric current runs through the wire. All the outlets in your house have alternating current. This means the current oscillates with a 60 Hz frequency and provides the changing current needed to make a changing magnetic field. On top of this large coil is a smaller coil (in my hand). This coil is just connected to a small lightbulb. When this small lightbulb-coil is near the changing magnetic field, you get an induced current. The current is large enough to light up the lightbulb.

Of course, an actual wireless charger is a little bit smaller – but same idea.

Last question. Previously, I looked at the possibility of charging a smartwatch just by shaking it. Could you power a smartwatch with a wireless charger? Yes, you could. However, the smart watch would have to be right on the charger. It wouldn’t work over a long distance – at least not with this type of wireless charger.

iPhone modified bronchoscope doesn’t intubate better than Glidescope or DL.


A recent study in BMC Anesthesiology compared an iPhone modified bronchoscope (iPMB) with existing intubation methods. Using a manikin, the iPMB was compared to flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope, glidescope, and a macintosh blade.

Sixty-three participants that were experienced with intubation used each device on a manikin. They intubated using the devices in both simple intubations as well as simulated difficult situations (where the neck was immobilized). The time to view the vocal cords (TVC) and the time taken for successful intubation (TSI) were measured for each intubation.

Screenshot 2014-06-26 11.06.04

Results for TVC for the iPhone were similar to the macintosh blade and bronchoscope. TSI was longer with the iPhone than with the unmodified bronchoscope and macintosh blade. The glidescope had better results in TVC and TSI than the other devices. There was also a higher rate of failure to intubate with the iPhone modified device.

This study does show that iPMB could be useful in training situations, since like the Glidescope, it provides a video display that can be seen by instructors and trainees simultaneously.

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Further, authors stressed how the iPhone’s built in capabilities of data and taking pictures would allow it to stream content remotely, or even to local devices.

This is a great study to highlight how sticking an iPhone onto a traditional device doesn’t necessarily make the procedure easier. I’m glad this study was done as I know some of my own colleagues have thought about putting a mobile device that captures videos onto a bronchoscope — it sounds like a fantastic idea. But in reality, we should stick to the Glidescope and direct Laryngoscopy.

Source: BMC Anesthesioogy