Take it from a doctor: Heart surgeon says statins DO NOT work, can even increase risk of diabetes and obesity


Image: Take it from a doctor: Heart surgeon says statins DO NOT work, can even increase risk of diabetes and obesity

If you aren’t taking statins, there is a good chance you know several people who do. After all, a quarter of the American population over the age of 45 takes one daily. Given their widespread use, you would think they are incredibly effective and safe, but nothing could be further from the truth – and some doctors are speaking out about the dangers.

When a respected heart surgeon like Dr. Dwight Lundell, who is the retired Chief of Surgery and Chief of Staff at Arizona’s Banner Heart Hospital, voices his concerns about statins, everyone should take notice. With 25 years of experience and more than 5,000 open heart surgeries under his belt, the doctor recently confessed that he, like many other physicians, has been getting it wrong when it comes to statins.

Dr. Lundell said that statins are no longer working, and the recommendations to take such medications and severely restrict fat intake are “no longer scientifically or morally defensible.”

As you might expect, his comments were not welcomed by the medical industry. Statins are huge money-makers in a population that is rife with obesity, poor eating habits and heart health concerns. Costing anywhere from $53 to $600 per month, drugs like Lipitor have racked up lifetime sales of $125 billion, while Crestor, 2013’s top-selling statin, generated $5.2 billion of revenue that year alone. With more people taking these drugs than ever, why are heart disease-related deaths still rising?

Lundell says that it’s time for a paradigm shift in how heart disease is treated now that we know its true cause is arterial wall inflammation. He said that foods full of sugars and simple carbohydrates, along with processed foods with omega-6 oils, “have slowly been poisoning everyone” and our bodies react to such “foreign invaders” with inflammation in the walls of arteries. If this inflammation is the cause of heart disease rather than high cholesterol, of course, there is no need for cholesterol-lowering statins. The inflammation, he says, causes the cholesterol to accumulate in blood vessel walls, so it’s the inflammation that we need to target.

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Those whose livelihoods depend on statin profits won’t be too thrilled with his advice: “By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food, you will reverse years of damage in your arteries and throughout your body from consuming the typical American diet.”

They’d much rather have people continuing to bark up the wrong tree, avoiding beneficial fats in favor of the very processed foods that create high cholesterol in the first place so they can convince you that you need their medications to bring it back down – medications that cause a slew of other health problems that will only drive you to need even more pills as the profits pile up.

For example, statins have been shown in studies to double your chances of developing diabetes and raise your risk of suffering serious diabetic complications, and they’ve also been linked to obesity.

https://www.brighteon.com/embed/5986093162001

Try a natural approach to heart health

So what should you do if you want to enhance your heart health? Increasing your physical activity, regardless of your current level, can make an impact, whether you’re completely sedentary and decide to start taking an evening stroll a few times a week or you already lift weights and choose to increase your reps.

Avoiding the foods Dr. Lundell identified as dangerous for heart health is another step that can make a big difference, so say goodbye to simple sugars and carbohydrates like refined sugar, white bread, and cookies, along with processed food.

While statins aren’t nearly as effective or safe as those who sell them would like you to believe, there are some very simple and affordable ways to keep your heart healthy without any negative side effects.

Eating lots of cheese may help you lose weight


Forget what you have heard about cheese – we have Gouda news for you.

Eating cheese does not raise your cholesterol and could actually help you lose weight, scientists have found.

Research from Ireland found people who eat a lot of cheese do not have a higher cholesterol than those who don’t.

They also discovered that people who eat more dairy tend to have a lower body mass index.

But current health guidelines suggest eating foods high in saturated fat can increase your risk of high cholesterol.

Evidence strongly suggests that high cholesterol can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots and angina.

It is often caused by an unhealthy diet or having a family history of stroke or heart disease.

For the study, 1,500 Irish adults kept a four-day food diary and were asked to note how much dairy they ate.

Their blood samples were then analysed for cholesterol levels and other metabolic health problems.They found that the adults with a lower body mass index ate more dairy.

However, lower blood pressure was associated with eating cheese more than other products like yogurt and milk.

They found that while adults who ate large amounts of cheese consumed more saturated fat, they did not have the associated higher cholesterol.

Dr. Emma Feeney, Food for Health Ireland’s program manager, said: “Simply looking at individual foods does not reflect the real story.

“What will really impact on our metabolic health, is the overall pattern in which whole foods are consumed.”

Source:http://nypost.com/

High cholesterol ‘does not cause heart disease’ new research finds, so treating with statins a ‘waste of time’


Statins
The new research suggests using statins to lower cholesterol in elderly pointless
Cholesterol does not cause heart disease in the elderly and trying to reduce it with drugs like statins is a waste of time, an international group of experts has claimed.

A review of research involving nearly 70,000 people found there was no link between what has traditionally been considered “bad” cholesterol and the premature deaths of over 60-year-olds from cardiovascular disease.

Published in the BMJ Open journal, the new study found that 92 percent of people with a high cholesterol level lived longer.

Lowering cholesterol with medications is a total waste of timeProfessor Sherif Sultan, University of Ireland

The authors have called for a re-evaluation of the guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of the arteries, because “the benefits from statin treatment have been exaggerated”.

The results have prompted immediate scepticism from other academics, however, who questioned the paper’s balance.

High cholesterol is commonly caused by an unhealthy diet, and eating high levels of saturated fat in particular, as well as smoking.

It is carried in the blood attached to proteins called lipoproteins and has been traditionally linked to cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease and aortic disease.

Man smoking a cigarette
Smoking can cause high cholesterol 

Co-author of the study Dr Malcolm Kendrick, an intermediate care GP, acknowledged the findings would cause controversy but defended them as “robust” and “thoroughly reviewed”.

“What we found in our detailed systematic review was that older people with high LDL (low-density lipoprotein) levels, the so-called “bad” cholesterol, lived longer and had less heart disease.”

Vascular and endovascular surgery expert Professor Sherif Sultan from the University of Ireland, who also worked on the study, said cholesterol is one of the “most vital” molecules in the body and prevents infection, cancer, muscle pain and other conditions in elderly people.

“Lowering cholesterol with medications for primary cardiovascular prevention in those aged over 60 is a total waste of time and resources, whereas altering your lifestyle is the single most important way to achieve a good quality of life,” he said.

Lead author Dr Uffe Ravnskov, a former associate professor of renal medicine at Lund University in Sweden, said there was “no reason” to lower high-LDL-cholesterol.

But Professor Colin Baigent, an epidemiologist at Oxford University, said the new study had “serious weaknesses and, as a consequence, has reached completely the wrong conclusion”.

Another sceptic, consultant cardiologist Dr Tim Chico, said he would be more convinced by randomised study where some patients have their cholesterol lowered using a drug, such as a stain, while others receive a placebo.

He said: “There have been several studies that tested whether higher cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol in elderly patients and observing whether this reduces their risk of heart disease.

“These have shown that lowering cholesterol using a drug does reduce the risk of heart disease in the elderly, and I find this more compelling than the data in the current study.”

The British Heart Foundation also questioned the new research, pointing out that the link between high LDL cholesterol levels and death in the elderly is harder to detect because, as people get older, more factors determine overall health.

“There is nothing in the current paper to support the author’s suggestions that the studies they reviewed cast doubt on the idea that LDL Cholesterol is a major cause of heart disease or that guidelines on LDL reduction in the elderly need re-valuating,” a spokesman said.

Stop taking statin drugs – high cholesterol leads to longer life


High cholesterol levels are believed to lead to heart conditions and early death. Statin drugs to lower LDL cholesterol are prescribed to more than 13 million Americans, and almost all men over the age of 60. Research published in the Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism in April 2015 now shows that, as you age, having high cholesterol is beneficial. The research, which was conducted in Japan, showed that people with the highest cholesterol levels had the lowest mortality rate from heart disease. The report states, “mortality actually goes down with higher total or low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, as reported by most Japanese epidemiological studies of the general population.”
cholesterol

What is cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a fat-soluble nutrient. It is soft and waxy and is essential for the human body. Though recognized as leading to atherosclerosis, cholesterol is also responsible for many important biological functions in the body. The human brain cannot function without cholesterol. Cholesterol is also important for the production of steroid hormones. Cholesterol helps reduce stress and may even be a treatment for MS, as the body needs cholesterol to build the myelin sheath that protects the nerves.

Cholesterol deficiency

People who have a genetic deficiency in cholesterol have a disease called Smith-Lemli-Opitz, or SLOS. This disease is recessive, so both parents need to have the disease for it to be passed on. People who have low or no cholesterol suffer from autism, vision problems, lower immunity and increased infections, and difficulty digesting food. Those born with no ability to make cholesterol can also have physical deformities in their hands, feet, or internal organs.

Diabetes and cholesterol

Those with diabetes tend to have too much of the bad type of cholesterol and not enough of the good type. This can lead to heart disease. The condition is known as diabetic dyslipidemia. In addition to heart disease, diabetics are then prone to atherosclerosis, in which the arteries become clogged with the fat, blocking blood vessels and damaging blood flow. Insulin resistance is linked to diabetic dyslipidemia, so diabetics need to be aware of their cholesterol levels and take special care with their diets.

Why is cholesterol important?

Cholesterol is needed by every cell in the body because it is part of the makeup of the cell membrane. Cholesterol allows interactions between the various chemicals that interact with one another. Without cholesterol, your body can’t make bile acid, leading to poor digestion. The sex hormones, estrogen and testosterone, are also made with the help of cholesterol. Even the production of vitamin D utilizes cholesterol for its creation. The brain cells need cholesterol as well. New research has suggested that cholesterol bonds with sulphur in the body to produce cholesterol sulfate. This thins the blood, and it may be that this allows the body to store electrons and lower blood pressure when walking barefoot. Because of this, cholesterol sulfate has been indicated as a possible treatment for reducing heart disease.

Where is cholesterol found in foods?

Cholesterol is found in mono-unsaturated fatty acids, or MUFAs. Foods with polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs, are detrimental to the body and to heart health. Foods with healthy fats are generally from the vegetable kingdom, such as vegetable oils.

Sources:

http://www.karger.com[PDF]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://www.eurekalert.org

http://www.healthboards.com