U.S. Navy to release genetically engineered organisms into the ocean, unleashing mass genetic pollution with devastating consequences


Image: U.S. Navy to release genetically engineered organisms into the ocean, unleashing mass genetic pollution with devastating consequences

(Natural News) No longer content to tinker with the genetic design of crops and humans, scientists – at the behest of the U.S. Military – are now turning their attention to the world’s oceans. As reported by Defense One, the Pentagon is looking at various ways in which to genetically engineer marine microorganisms into living surveillance equipment capable of detecting enemy submarines, divers and other suspicious underwater traffic.

The Military is also looking at using genetic engineering to create living camouflage in which creatures react to their surroundings to avoid detection, along with a host of other potentially nefarious applications.

While such modifications might appear to offer benefits to national security endeavors, there will be a price to pay – as is always the case when scientists interfere with genetic design. What will the effects of mass genetic pollution be on our oceans, and what irreversible and devastating results may be unleashed? (Related: First GMO ever produced by genetic engineering poisoned thousands of Americans.)

Unleashing engineered organisms without knowing the consequences

Military officials, who insist that this type of research is still in its infancy, are being supported in their endeavors by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL).

Defense One explained the research in more detail:

You take an abundant sea organism, like Marinobacter, and change its genetic makeup to react to certain substances left by enemy vessels, divers, or equipment. These could be metals, fuel exhaust, human DNA, or some molecule that’s not found naturally in the ocean but is associated with, say, diesel-powered submarines. The reaction could take the form of electron loss, which could be detectable to friendly sub drones.

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“In an engineered context, we might take the ability of the microbes to give up electrons, then use [those electrons] to talk to something like an autonomous vehicle,” explained NRL researcher, Sarah Glaven, who was speaking at an event hosted by the Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab. “Then you can start imagining that you can create an electrical signal when the bacteria encounters some molecule in their environment.”

Researchers have already proven, in a laboratory environment, that the genes of E. Coli bacteria can be manipulated to exhibit properties that could prove useful for submarine detection. However, this type of research is limited because it may not necessarily be replicable in marine life found in the areas where you need them to be in order to detect unfriendly subs.

Nonetheless, Glaven believes that the team can make these types of mutated marine organisms a reality in just a year.

“The reason we think we can accomplish this is because we have this vast database of info we’ve collected from growing these natural systems,” she noted. “So after experiments where we look at switching gene potential, gene expression, regulatory networks, we are finding these sensors.” (Related: Genetic pollution harms organisms through 14 generations of offspring, stunning scientific study reveals.)

Part of a wider “synthetic biology” military program

This marine modification research forms part of a greater $45 million military program which encompasses the Navy, Army and Air Force platforms, and has been labeled the Applied Research for the Advancement of Science and Technology Priorities Program on Synthetic Biology for Military Environments. The program aims to provide researchers in these branches of the military with whatever tools they deem necessary to engineer genetic responses in a way that could be manipulated by the Military.

It is not difficult to imagine that this large-scale genetic manipulation program could create disastrous effects – effects which our children and grandchildren will be left to deal with, and which may prove irreversible.

Electronic tongue can tell if your honey is adulterated


Image: Electronic tongue can tell if your honey is adulterated

In response to all of the fake honey that have been infiltrating the market for the longest time, Spanish researchers have come up with an electronic tongue that can tell the difference. An article in Alpha Galileo reported that the device is inexpensive, is quick to pick up on the presence of adulterated honey, and can even tell you how much fake sweetener is present.

Current methods of determining the authenticity of a honey product requires days of thoroughly analyzing the sample. In comparison, the new device takes just an hour to figure out if the honey is truly pure or has been diluted by scammers.

The Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) researchers demonstrated the capability of their new device in a test. Their results showed that the electronic tongue can tell between pure honey and the syrups and sugar molasses that are commonly used to dilute the profitable product.

“This leads to noticeable losses for the honey bee sector,” remarked Lara Sobrino. A researcher who works at UPV’s Developmental Food Engineering Institute, she added that the scam not only violates EU laws, it also causes consumers to lose faith in the honey bee sector, which will hurt the industry in the long run. (Related: Understanding the differences between sugars: white, brown, raw, molasses, honey, agave.)

This electronic tongue can tell genuine honey from watered-down fakes

The official name of the device is the “electronic voltammetric tongue.” Its creators described it as an effective and affordable alternative to the bulkier gear used by most scam hunters. It will not only spot the presence of syrups in real honey, but will also determine the percentage of the product that has been compromised.

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In the test, the device compared pure honey from heather, orange blossom, and sunflower with dietary syrups made from barley, brown rice, and corn. It successfully differentiated the true honey from the syrups used to fake them.

The electronic tongue is able to clean itself very thoroughly. This reduces the chances of erroneous analysis caused by leftovers from the previous sample.

Finally, it enables statistical analysis of the resulting information. The combination allowed the device to detect any symptoms of fraud in a product.

“Out work offers a pioneering analytical technique that makes it possible to find out quickly and reliably the honey’s authenticity,” said Juan Soto, another UPV researcher from the university’s Molecular Recognition and Technological Development Institute who worked alongside Sobrino. He believed that the electronic tongue offers an answer to suspicions about the purity of honey products.

New device can improve the efficiency of existing methods for hunting fake honey

Members of the honey bee sector can use the UPV detector to ensure the quality of their products, thereby restoring the faith of their customers. They will also be able to catch scammers who are taking advantage of the confusion to make big bucks off gullible consumers.

“If there is the suspicion that a honey could be adulterated, our system detects the symptoms reliably,” Soto said. He also noted that their electronic tongue will work best alongside other detectors as a first line of defense against fakes.

Magnetic resonance detectors are slower and much more expensive than the UPV device. But they can perform in-depth analyses of samples that are beyond the specialized capabilities of the electronic tongue.

Soto believes that his team’s device can screen suspicious samples first. If it catches any fake honey, it can pass the offender over to another identification technique for confirmation.

Developed a taste for the latest news about honey? You can satisfy your craving for more stories at Bees.news.

Sources include:

AlphaGalileo.org

ScienceDirect.com

Electronic tongue can tell if your honey is adulterated


Image: Electronic tongue can tell if your honey is adulterated

In response to all of the fake honey that have been infiltrating the market for the longest time, Spanish researchers have come up with an electronic tongue that can tell the difference. An article in Alpha Galileo reported that the device is inexpensive, is quick to pick up on the presence of adulterated honey, and can even tell you how much fake sweetener is present.

Current methods of determining the authenticity of a honey product requires days of thoroughly analyzing the sample. In comparison, the new device takes just an hour to figure out if the honey is truly pure or has been diluted by scammers.

The Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) researchers demonstrated the capability of their new device in a test. Their results showed that the electronic tongue can tell between pure honey and the syrups and sugar molasses that are commonly used to dilute the profitable product.

“This leads to noticeable losses for the honey bee sector,” remarked Lara Sobrino. A researcher who works at UPV’s Developmental Food Engineering Institute, she added that the scam not only violates EU laws, it also causes consumers to lose faith in the honey bee sector, which will hurt the industry in the long run. (Related: Understanding the differences between sugars: white, brown, raw, molasses, honey, agave.)

This electronic tongue can tell genuine honey from watered-down fakes

The official name of the device is the “electronic voltammetric tongue.” Its creators described it as an effective and affordable alternative to the bulkier gear used by most scam hunters. It will not only spot the presence of syrups in real honey, but will also determine the percentage of the product that has been compromised.

Mother Nature’s micronutrient secret: Organic Broccoli Sprout Capsules now available, delivering 280mg of high-density nutrition, including the extraordinary “sulforaphane” and “glucosinolate” nutrients found only in cruciferous healing foods. Every lot laboratory tested. See availability here.

In the test, the device compared pure honey from heather, orange blossom, and sunflower with dietary syrups made from barley, brown rice, and corn. It successfully differentiated the true honey from the syrups used to fake them.

The electronic tongue is able to clean itself very thoroughly. This reduces the chances of erroneous analysis caused by leftovers from the previous sample.

Finally, it enables statistical analysis of the resulting information. The combination allowed the device to detect any symptoms of fraud in a product.

“Out work offers a pioneering analytical technique that makes it possible to find out quickly and reliably the honey’s authenticity,” said Juan Soto, another UPV researcher from the university’s Molecular Recognition and Technological Development Institute who worked alongside Sobrino. He believed that the electronic tongue offers an answer to suspicions about the purity of honey products.

New device can improve the efficiency of existing methods for hunting fake honey

Members of the honey bee sector can use the UPV detector to ensure the quality of their products, thereby restoring the faith of their customers. They will also be able to catch scammers who are taking advantage of the confusion to make big bucks off gullible consumers.

“If there is the suspicion that a honey could be adulterated, our system detects the symptoms reliably,” Soto said. He also noted that their electronic tongue will work best alongside other detectors as a first line of defense against fakes.

Magnetic resonance detectors are slower and much more expensive than the UPV device. But they can perform in-depth analyses of samples that are beyond the specialized capabilities of the electronic tongue.

Soto believes that his team’s device can screen suspicious samples first. If it catches any fake honey, it can pass the offender over to another identification technique for confirmation.

Developed a taste for the latest news about honey? You can satisfy your craving for more stories at Bees.news.

Sources include:

AlphaGalileo.org

ScienceDirect.com