The 9 Best Fermented Foods for Your Gut


Fermented food has made a comeback in recent years, partially thanks to the popularization of Weston A. Price teachings. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi aren’t considered to be the most appealing types of food; however, research exploring these and other fermented products on gut, brain, and body health has revitalized public interest.

The fermentation process encourages essential bacteria such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria to flourish. This makes fermentation a good source of probiotics for vegans, since many fermented foods are plant based. Vegetables are submerged in a salty brine during preparation to kill off dangerous, pathogenic bacteria. The good bacteria break down lactose and other sugars and starches in the food, making digestion easier. And once they reach your gut, they continue to help break down food and keep out bad guys like E. coli and C. difficile.

Fermented food has made a comeback in recent years, partially thanks to the popularization of Weston A. Price teachings. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi aren’t considered to be the most appealing types of food; however, research exploring these and other fermented products on gut, brain, and body health has revitalized public interest.

The fermentation process encourages essential bacteria such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria to flourish. This makes fermentation a good source of probiotics for vegans, since many fermented foods are plant based. Vegetables are submerged in a salty brine during preparation to kill off dangerous, pathogenic bacteria. The good bacteria break down lactose and other sugars and starches in the food, making digestion easier. And once they reach your gut, they continue to help break down food and keep out bad guys like E. coli and C. difficile.

The Best Fermented Foods

When it comes to fermented foods, your options aren’t limited to sauerkraut or fermented soy. There’s other fantastic options that are considered “fermented,” including tea, yogurt, and various vegetables. Here are the 9 best fermented foods you should be eating for your gut.

1. Yogurt

Yogurt has many benefits, mostly due to its rich probiotic content. Brands of yogurt that contain billions of live active cultures may support digestion, and some research indicates it could even benefit the skin. [1] Raw, unpasteurized yogurt is ideal if you can handle dairy. Personally, I tend to skip dairy altogether, but you can find dairy-free yogurt options at many stores these days, some of which are made from coconut and almond milk. Be sure you’re choosing yogurt that contains live active cultures, and try to choose plain, full-fat versions in order to avoid sugar. Yogurt that contains sugar can be counterproductive, as sugars feed pathogenic bacteria and contribute to sugar overload.

2. Natto

Natto is prepared with soybeans and is fermented so it forms the beneficial bacteria Bacillus. It’s an excellent source of calcium, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin K2. You may not have heard a lot about it, but K2 is essential for heart health as it keeps calcium out of your arteries and gets it to your bones where it’s needed. Natto also contains nattokinase, a powerful anti-clotting agent that protects your heart and brain and lowers your blood pressure.

3. Kefir

Kefir is a bit like yogurt, except that it’s more of a drinkable consistency. Researchers report kefir may reduce irritation in the intestines, preventing toxins and other pathogens from getting into the blood. [2] If you’re choosing to drink dairy kefir, make sure it’s organic and isn’t loaded with refined sugar. There are options for making your own dairy-free water kefir, and many health food companies online sell kefir grains specifically for this purpose. You can also check out our recipe for making coconut milk kefir.

4. Kombucha

Made from tea, clean water, sugar, yeast, and bacteria, kombucha has become popular recently for its probiotic qualities. Its fizzy bite is also popular among those used to drinking soda. Research finds this fermented tea fights off E. coli and Staph bacteria in the digestive tract, possibly protecting against illness and aiding digestion. [3]

How to Make Kombucha - Copy

5. Sauerkraut

Traditional sauerkraut preparation uses water, salt, and cabbage, and very little heat is applied to the final product in order to prevent killing off beneficial microbes. The sour taste comes from lacto-fermentation, or the breakdown of lactose by the probiotic bacteria native to the cabbage. A serving gives you a powerful dose of healthy probiotics that aid digestion, and research has found raw sauerkraut prevents cancer cells from forming. [4] Be sure to purchase raw sauerkraut, or better yet, make it yourself with organic cabbage and Himalayan salt.

6. Kimchi

This spicy Asian fermented cabbage, similar to sauerkraut, provides you with loads of probiotics. Extensive research indicates it contributes to colon health, lower cholesterol, better thinking, a stronger immune system, healthy skin, and weight loss. Additional research also shows it has anti-oxidative, anti-aging, and immune-supporting properties. [5]

7. Tempeh

This Indonesian ‘cake’ has a nutty flavor and chewy texture, and because of this it is often used as a replacement for meat in many vegan recipes. Traditionally made from soybeans and a yeast starter, it undergoes controlled fermentation that makes it a great source of probiotic bacteria. Tempeh is also a great source of calcium, iron, and magnesium.

8. Pickles

Raw pickles, much like sauerkraut, makes for a great introduction to fermented foods. Pickles made by lacto-fermentation makes this a delicious snack and a great food for aiding digestion and supporting a strong immune system.

9. Lassi

Yogurt and fermented dairy play an important role in Indian cuisine. Lassi is made by combining yogurt and milk (or water) and sometimes fruit and spices to create a great probiotic-rich drink. It digests quickly, helps restore friendly gut bacteria, and soothes irritation in the colon. Again, I don’t recommend consuming conventional dairy, especially from cows. If you are going to drink lassi, it’s best to find a product using grass-fed, free-range goat milk. Goat milk tends to digest more easily. If you’re vegan, try finding or making lassi with organic coconut or almond milk yogurt.

Digestion-01

Other Tips to Support Digestion

Each of these 9 probiotic foods will help restore balance to your intestinal ecosystem, but they’re not the only way to support digestion. Prebiotics, or foods containing inulin, sustain your current gut bacteria by providing them the foods they need to thrive. Probiotic supplements, digestive enzymes, and colon and liver cleansing are also great ways to support your digestive system.

What probiotic foods do you eat? Share your tips and recipes with us!

– Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Article sources:

The Best Fermented Foods

When it comes to fermented foods, your options aren’t limited to sauerkraut or fermented soy. There’s other fantastic options that are considered “fermented,” including tea, yogurt, and various vegetables. Here are the 9 best fermented foods you should be eating for your gut.

1. Yogurt

Yogurt has many benefits, mostly due to its rich probiotic content. Brands of yogurt that contain billions of live active cultures may support digestion, and some research indicates it could even benefit the skin. [1] Raw, unpasteurized yogurt is ideal if you can handle dairy. Personally, I tend to skip dairy altogether, but you can find dairy-free yogurt options at many stores these days, some of which are made from coconut and almond milk. Be sure you’re choosing yogurt that contains live active cultures, and try to choose plain, full-fat versions in order to avoid sugar. Yogurt that contains sugar can be counterproductive, as sugars feed pathogenic bacteria and contribute to sugar overload.

2. Natto

Natto is prepared with soybeans and is fermented so it forms the beneficial bacteria Bacillus. It’s an excellent source of calcium, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin K2. You may not have heard a lot about it, but K2 is essential for heart health as it keeps calcium out of your arteries and gets it to your bones where it’s needed. Natto also contains nattokinase, a powerful anti-clotting agent that protects your heart and brain and lowers your blood pressure.

3. Kefir

Kefir is a bit like yogurt, except that it’s more of a drinkable consistency. Researchers report kefir may reduce irritation in the intestines, preventing toxins and other pathogens from getting into the blood. [2] If you’re choosing to drink dairy kefir, make sure it’s organic and isn’t loaded with refined sugar. There are options for making your own dairy-free water kefir, and many health food companies online sell kefir grains specifically for this purpose. You can also check out our recipe for making coconut milk kefir.

4. Kombucha

Made from tea, clean water, sugar, yeast, and bacteria, kombucha has become popular recently for its probiotic qualities. Its fizzy bite is also popular among those used to drinking soda. Research finds this fermented tea fights off E. coli and Staph bacteria in the digestive tract, possibly protecting against illness and aiding digestion. [3]

5. Sauerkraut

Traditional sauerkraut preparation uses water, salt, and cabbage, and very little heat is applied to the final product in order to prevent killing off beneficial microbes. The sour taste comes from lacto-fermentation, or the breakdown of lactose by the probiotic bacteria native to the cabbage. A serving gives you a powerful dose of healthy probiotics that aid digestion, and research has found raw sauerkraut prevents cancer cells from forming. [4] Be sure to purchase raw sauerkraut, or better yet, make it yourself with organic cabbage and Himalayan salt.

6. Kimchi

This spicy Asian fermented cabbage, similar to sauerkraut, provides you with loads of probiotics. Extensive research indicates it contributes to colon health, lower cholesterol, better thinking, a stronger immune system, healthy skin, and weight loss. Additional research also shows it has anti-oxidative, anti-aging, and immune-supporting properties. [5]

7. Tempeh

This Indonesian ‘cake’ has a nutty flavor and chewy texture, and because of this it is often used as a replacement for meat in many vegan recipes. Traditionally made from soybeans and a yeast starter, it undergoes controlled fermentation that makes it a great source of probiotic bacteria. Tempeh is also a great source of calcium, iron, and magnesium.

8. Pickles

Raw pickles, much like sauerkraut, makes for a great introduction to fermented foods. Pickles made by lacto-fermentation makes this a delicious snack and a great food for aiding digestion and supporting a strong immune system.

9. Lassi

Yogurt and fermented dairy play an important role in Indian cuisine. Lassi is made by combining yogurt and milk (or water) and sometimes fruit and spices to create a great probiotic-rich drink. It digests quickly, helps restore friendly gut bacteria, and soothes irritation in the colon. Again, I don’t recommend consuming conventional dairy, especially from cows. If you are going to drink lassi, it’s best to find a product using grass-fed, free-range goat milk. Goat milk tends to digest more easily. If you’re vegan, try finding or making lassi with organic coconut or almond milk yogurt.

Digestion-01

Other Tips to Support Digestion

Each of these 9 probiotic foods will help restore balance to your intestinal ecosystem, but they’re not the only way to support digestion. Prebiotics, or foods containing inulin, sustain your current gut bacteria by providing them the foods they need to thrive. Probiotic supplements, digestive enzymes, and colon and liver cleansing are also great ways to support your digestive system.

What probiotic foods do you eat? Share your tips and recipes with us!

– Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Article sources:

Cheesy Goodness No Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Cheese Lovers Study Finds


Contrary to what you’ve been taught, cheese is not the artery-clogging heart destroyer that it’s been set up to be, according to researchers at the University of Dublin, who studied 1,500 Irish who love their cheese. In fact, as reported by StudyFinds, researchers found that those who ate low-fat dairy products actually had higher cholesterol levels than those who didn’t.

If you’re confused about this study and cholesterol in general, it’s not your fault. Cholesterol has been a highly-publicized scapegoat for causing heart disease for decades, causing countless people not only to avoid healthy saturated fats, but to be talked into going on to cholesterol-lowering drugs — both of which are exactly opposite what you should be doing. The truth is, it’s a myth that cholesterol is bad for you.

Your body needs cholesterol. That’s why your liver makes it. In reality, cholesterol has many health benefits, including regulating protein pathways involved in cell signaling. It also plays an essential role in your brain, which contains about 25 percent of the cholesterol in your body. It is critical for synapse formation, i.e., the connections between your neurons, which allow you to think, learn new things and form memories.

If you’re looking for a non-drug way to boost your heart health, start by reducing or eliminating grains and sugars from your diet and learn to burn fat for fuel, instead. Make sure you’re getting plenty of high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fats, such as krill oil, which can improve your cholesterol levels.

Replace harmful vegetable oils and synthetic trans fats with healthy fats, such as olive oil, butter, avocado, pastured eggs and coconut oil. And, include fermented foods in your daily diet and optimize your vitamin D levels.

Source:http://blogs.mercola.com

The 9 Best Fermented Foods for Your Gut


Fermented food has made a comeback in recent years, partially thanks to the popularization of Weston A. Price teachings. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi aren’t considered to be the most appealing types of food; however, research exploring these and other fermented products on gut, brain, and body health has revitalized public interest.

The fermentation process encourages essential bacteria such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria to flourish. This makes fermentation a good source of probiotics for vegans, since many fermented foods are plant based. Vegetables are submerged in a salty brine during preparation to kill off dangerous, pathogenic bacteria. The good bacteria break down lactose and other sugars and starches in the food, making digestion easier. And once they reach your gut, they continue to help break down food and keep out bad guys like E. coli and C. difficile.

The Best Fermented Foods

When it comes to fermented foods, your options aren’t limited to sauerkraut or fermented soy. There’s other fantastic options that are considered “fermented,” including tea, yogurt, and various vegetables. Here are the 9 best fermented foods you should be eating for your gut.

1. Yogurt

Yogurt has many benefits, mostly due to its rich probiotic content. Brands of yogurt that contain billions of live active cultures may support digestion, and some research indicates it could even benefit the skin. [1] Raw, unpasteurized yogurt is ideal if you can handle dairy. Personally, I tend to skip dairy altogether, but you can find dairy-free yogurt options at many stores these days, some of which are made from coconut and almond milk. Be sure you’re choosing yogurt that contains live active cultures, and try to choose plain, full-fat versions in order to avoid sugar. Yogurt that contains sugar can be counterproductive, as sugars feed pathogenic bacteria and contribute to sugar overload.

2. Natto

Natto is prepared with soybeans and is fermented so it forms the beneficial bacteria Bacillus. It’s an excellent source of calcium, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin K2. You may not have heard a lot about it, but K2 is essential for heart health as it keeps calcium out of your arteries and gets it to your bones where it’s needed. Natto also contains nattokinase, a powerful anti-clotting agent that protects your heart and brain and lowers your blood pressure.

3. Kefir

Kefir is a bit like yogurt, except that it’s more of a drinkable consistency. Researchers report kefir may reduce irritation in the intestines, preventing toxins and other pathogens from getting into the blood. [2] If you’re choosing to drink dairy kefir, make sure it’s organic and isn’t loaded with refined sugar. There are options for making your own dairy-free water kefir, and many health food companies online sell kefir grains specifically for this purpose. You can also check out our recipe for making coconut milk kefir.

4. Kombucha

Made from tea, clean water, sugar, yeast, and bacteria, kombucha has become popular recently for its probiotic qualities. Its fizzy bite is also popular among those used to drinking soda. Research finds this fermented tea fights off E. coli and Staph bacteria in the digestive tract, possibly protecting against illness and aiding digestion. [3]

How to Make Kombucha - Copy

5. Sauerkraut

Traditional sauerkraut preparation uses water, salt, and cabbage, and very little heat is applied to the final product in order to prevent killing off beneficial microbes. The sour taste comes from lacto-fermentation, or the breakdown of lactose by the probiotic bacteria native to the cabbage. A serving gives you a powerful dose of healthy probiotics that aid digestion, and research has found raw sauerkraut prevents cancer cells from forming. [4] Be sure to purchase raw sauerkraut, or better yet, make it yourself with organic cabbage and Himalayan salt.

6. Kimchi

This spicy Asian fermented cabbage, similar to sauerkraut, provides you with loads of probiotics. Extensive research indicates it contributes to colon health, lower cholesterol, better thinking, a stronger immune system, healthy skin, and weight loss. Additional research also shows it has anti-oxidative, anti-aging, and immune-supporting properties. [5]

7. Tempeh

This Indonesian ‘cake’ has a nutty flavor and chewy texture, and because of this it is often used as a replacement for meat in many vegan recipes. Traditionally made from soybeans and a yeast starter, it undergoes controlled fermentation that makes it a great source of probiotic bacteria. Tempeh is also a great source of calcium, iron, and magnesium.

8. Pickles

Raw pickles, much like sauerkraut, makes for a great introduction to fermented foods. Pickles made by lacto-fermentation makes this a delicious snack and a great food for aiding digestion and supporting a strong immune system.

9. Lassi

Yogurt and fermented dairy play an important role in Indian cuisine. Lassi is made by combining yogurt and milk (or water) and sometimes fruit and spices to create a great probiotic-rich drink. It digests quickly, helps restore friendly gut bacteria, and soothes irritation in the colon. Again, I don’t recommend consuming conventional dairy, especially from cows. If you are going to drink lassi, it’s best to find a product using grass-fed, free-range goat milk. Goat milk tends to digest more easily. If you’re vegan, try finding or making lassi with organic coconut or almond milk yogurt.

Digestion-01

Other Tips to Support Digestion

Each of these 9 probiotic foods will help restore balance to your intestinal ecosystem, but they’re not the only way to support digestion. Prebiotics, or foods containing inulin, sustain your current gut bacteria by providing them the foods they need to thrive. Probiotic supplements, digestive enzymes, and colon and liver cleansing are also great ways to support your digestive system.

What probiotic foods do you eat? Share your tips and recipes with us!

The Fuss About Fermented Foods


The Fuss About Fermented Foods

There’s nothing new about fermenting food. In fact, it may be one of the oldest food preparation techniques around. Long before we were sipping pricey Kombuchas at the local café, our ancestors were using this process as a means of keeping their food from spoiling in age without refrigeration.

Lately, despite our ability to preserve and refrigerate food, fermentation is all the rage again. So what exactly are fermented foods (and beverages)? And why should we make a point of including them in ourdiets?

What are fermented foods?

Fermented foods are foods that have been through a process of lactofermentation in which natural bacteria feed on the sugar and starch in the food creating lactic acid. This process preserves the food, and creates beneficial enzymes, b-vitamins, Omega-3 fatty acids, and various strains of probiotics.

Natural fermentation of foods has also been shown to preserve nutrients in food and break the food down to a more digestible form. This, along with the bevy of probiotics created during the fermentation process, could explain the link between consumption of fermented foods and improved digestion.

Cultures around the world have been eating fermented foods for years, from Sauerkraut in Germany to Kimichi in Korea and everywhere in between. Studies have even shown the link between probiotic rich foods and overall health (PDF). Sadly, with the advances in technology and food preparation, these time-honored traditional foods have been largely lost in our society.

Where Have All the Fermented Foods Gone?

The amount of probiotics and enzymes available in the average diet has declined sharply over the last few decades as pasteurized milk has replaced raw, pasteurised yogurt has replaced homemade, vinegar based pickels and sauerkraut have replaced traditional lacto-fermented versions…the list goes on.

Even the much maligned grains were safer to eat in earlier times since their preparation included soaking, sprouting and fermenting, which largely reduces the anti-nutrient content and makes them less harmful (notice – I still didn’t say good!).

Instead of the nutrient rich foods full of enzymes and probiotics that our grandparents probably ate, the average diet today consists mainly of sugar laden, lab created dead foods.

Why Eat Fermented Foods?

Besides the fact that they taste great and really grow on you, there are several great reasons to start making and eating fermented foods:

Probiotics: Eating fermented foods and drinking fermented drinks like Kefir and Kombucha will introduce beneficial bacteria into your digestive system and help the balance of bacteria in your digestive system. Probiotics have also been shown to help slow or reverse some diseases, improve bowel health, aid digestion, and improve immunity!

Absorb Food Better: Having the proper balance of gut bacteria and enough digestive enzymes helps you absorb more of the nutrients in the foods you eat. Pair this with your healthy real food diet, and you will absorb many more nutrients from the foods you eat. You won’t need as many supplements and vitamins, and you’ll be absorbing more of the live nutrients in your foods.

Budget Friendly: Incorporating healthy foods into your diet can get expensive, but not so with fermented foods. You can make your own whey at home for a couple of dollars, and using that and sea salt, ferment many foods very inexpensively. Drinks like Water Kefir and Kombucha can be made at home also and cost only pennies per serving. Adding these things to your diet can also cut down on the number of supplements you need, helping the budget further.

Preserves Food Easily: Homemade salsa only lasts a few days in the fridge- Fermented homemade salsa lasts months! The same goes for sauerkraut, pickles, beets and other garden foods. Lacto-fermentation allows you to store these foods for longer periods of time without losing the nutrients like you would with traditional canning.

How to Incorporate Fermented Foods Into Your Diet?

On a basic level, you can make foods like sauerkraut with just cabbage, water and salt on your counter.

You can also incorporate fermented drinks like Water Kefir and Kombucha, which are inexpensive to make and can be carbonated like soda!

Probiotics: What they are and how to take them?


If you’re not familiar with probiotics, probiotics are cultures of “good bacteria”.  Your gut contains a combination of both good and bad bacteria. Probiotics help ensure a good balance of intestinal flora.

When we use the word probiotic, most of the time it’s referring to a supplement. However, the term can also be used when talking about fermented foods, as they also contain good bacteria.

How to Take Probiotics

Many people know the benefits of adding probiotics, “friendly bacteria”, to their health regimen and take them either as a supplement or consume them in fermented foods that have active live cultures, such as yogurt, fermented pickles or fermented sauerkraut.

If you are taking a probiotic supplement, it is best to take it on an empty stomach when you wake up in the morning or before bed. When you first get up, take the probiotic, and then get ready for the day preferably waiting at least 30 minutes before you eat breakfast.

You can also take the probiotic with food and still get pretty good absorption. The reason this may decrease some absorption of a supplement probiotic is that the probiotic ends up spending more time in the stomach. Also, another reason to take them on an empty stomach is because before the journey to the intestines, the bacteria will have more difficulty surviving the harsh stomach acid during digestion, affecting their potency.

But, don’t take them after a meal! Probiotics that are taken after a meal have even more difficulty surviving stomach acid levels as this is when your stomach acid is at its highest. A study from last year found that when a probiotic supplement was taken after a meal, extremely low levels of bacteria survived.

How Else to Get Probotics

You don’t have to take probiotic supplements to ensure healthy intestinal flora, you can also make fermented foods! It is best to make them yourself and not rely on store bought fermented foods as they are often preserved in salt rather than in lactobacterial-salt.

Benefits of taking Probiotic or Fermented Foods:

  1. Improved digestion
  2. Healthier gut
  3. Improved absorption of vitamins, nutrients, and minerals
  4. Reduction in cavities
  5. Increased resistance to infection, reduces risk of flu and colds
  6. Reduced risk of colon cancer
  7. Beneficial for irritable bowel syndrome, Chron’s disease, etc.

When Rotten Food Is Actually Good Food Read more at: http://forum.facmedicine.com/threads/when-rotten-food-is-actually-good-food.20206/


“Rotten” and “spoiled” aren’t words typically used to describe delicious food. Yet fermented foods, like sauerkraut, soy sauce, pickles, and prosciutto, are technically rotten. How can rotten food also be considered good food? The team behind MinuteEarth, a YouTube channel devoted to “science and stories about our awesome planet,” breaks it down in their latest video.

Turns out, our favorite foods are home to millions of microbes. In fact, many of the tastes and textures we love are because of tiny bacteria and fungi. Ninety-nine percent of these microbes are harmless to humans; it’s the one percent that is gross enough to influence a natural aversion to anything that might harbor the nasty germs we think of when we think of rotten food. Take cheese, for example. Blue cheese’s strong smell stems from the same bacteria responsible for foot odor.

However, “mold spores populate smalls holes and cracks in soon to be blue cheese[…]giving it its smoothness and rich, funky flavor.” This process is known as fermentation. Fermented foods tend to be the ones people explain will “grow on you.” These foods have been exposed to bacteria and yeasts, resulting in the flavors, textures and smells, that take time to get used to… because they’re somewhat spoiled. But rest assured these friendly, fermented microbes are healthy and safe to consume. In addition to sauerkraut, kefir, kimchi, and kombucha are examples of good, albeit rotten food. Watch MinuteEarth’s entire video for more on the process of fermentation — and why it’s necessary for some foods to spoil a little bit.

WATCH THE VIDEO.url:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yswzITbAbA

 

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Studies show many health benefits from eating fermented foods.


Although the human body is made up of 10 times as many bacteria as human cells, mainstream medicine and an unsuspecting public continue to kill off the bacteria that make up their body indiscriminately through the use of antibiotics and antibacterial products. Meanwhile, studies show that many of the health issues being faced by our modern society are being created by damage caused to our internal flora. At the same time other studies along with human experience are showing the health benefits that come from undoing that damage through the consumption of fermented foods.

health

The human body is made up of an estimated 10 trillion human cells and 100 trillion bacteria which means we are actually more a collection of bacteria than we are human. However many products commonly used today for cleaning and personal hygiene (antibacterial hand sanitizers for example), as well as antibiotics and chemical laden junk foods are damaging the bacteria that keep us healthy and make us what we are.

Prior to the paranoia over bacteria and the implementation of pasteurization, all traditional cultures not only survived despite bacteria, they actually thrived by making use of bacteria (albeit unknowingly) to create healthy, fermented foods. These fermented foods not only allowed traditional cultures without refrigeration to store foods for the times when food was not plentiful, but they helped keep them strong and healthy by keeping their internal flora balanced and therefore their immune systems strong.

Fermented foods are key to good gut flora

Today there is a resurgence of interest in fermented foods. It is a craze that is growing among those looking for healthier diet options and recent studies back up what those fermented food fans know through experience: fermented food is healthy food! Studies have shown that regular consumption offermented foods can not only correct digestive problems, but also have positive effects on heart disease, arthritis, obesity, gum disease, mood and more.

Although many associate fermented foods simply with dairy products such as yogurt, kefir and cheese, there is much to learn because the variety of foods that can be fermented is endless. From the more traditional German sauerkraut, Vietnamese kimchi and sourdough breads, to more unusual mixtures such as fermented beetroot with garlic and cheeses made from nuts, there are unlimited ways to add these simple, healthy foods to our diets.

Sources for this article include

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

http://www.theglobeandmail.com

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com