Clove Bud Oil: The Plant-Based Dental Aide


You’re probably familiar with clove, an aromatic spice that is commonly used in Indian and Chinese culture as seasoning and for medicinal purposes. Cloves, also known as clove buds, gained popularity all over the world, especially in the western hemisphere, during the 7th century because of their health benefits.

Like other spices, cloves can also be used to make an essential oil. While it is not as popular as other plant oils, there are numerous reasons why you should consider having clove bud oil at home.

What Is Clove Bud Oil?

Clove bud oil is derived from the clove tree, a member of the Myrtaceae family. This tree is native to Southeast Asian countries like Indonesia. From the evergreen, you can derive three types of clove essential oils: clove bud oil, clove leaf oil, and clove stem oil.

Out of the three, clove bud essential oil – also known as Eugenia carophyllata – is the most popular in aromatherapy. Oil produced from the leaves and stems have stronger chemical compositions and can easily cause skin irritations, which makes them unfit for aromatherapy.1

During the time of ancient Greeks and Romans, this plant oil was used to relieve toothaches and to combat bad breath.2 Its presence was also found in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine with the same purpose.

Today, clove bud oil is known for its benefits to oral health.3 This essential oil has been approved as a dental anesthetic and, as mouthwash and gargle, can help relieve toothaches, as well as fight mouth and throat infections. It is also added to pharmaceutical and dental products.

Uses of Clove Bud Oil

The oil of clove buds is known for its antimicrobial, antifungal, antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, and stimulant properties. Apart from its positive effects in the field of dental care, it can also be used as a treatment for minor health concerns. Below are some of the most common uses of this plant oil:4, 5, 6

  • Digestive aid – Cloves possess beneficial properties that help relax the smooth muscle lining in your gastrointestinal tract. When used as an oil, it can aid in halting digestive problems, like nausea and vomiting.
  • Skin care product – When applied topically, clove buds can help address skin problems like warts, acne, sagging skin, and wrinkles.
  • Insect repellent – When used together with citrus essential oils, this plant oil can help ward insects away.
  • Expectorant – Clove bud oil is also used to help ease respiratory problems, such as cough, colds, sinusitis, asthma, and tuberculosis. In fact, chewing on a clove bud is said to help sore throats.
  • Antiseptic – It is applied topically  to address fungal infections, wounds, and cuts. It is also a common treatment for athlete’s foot.
  • Perfume ingredient – Bud oil, with its strong and unique scent, is used in carnation, rose, and honeysuckle perfumes. It has a strong and unique scent.
  • Flavoring agent – This is because of the oil’s unique flavor and aroma.
  • Soap ingredient – Clove bud oil is used in soaps not just for its fragrance, but also because of its relaxing and antiseptic qualities.
  • Massage oil – It can be used to relieve pain and stress.

Composition of Clove Bud Oil

The predominant chemical constituents found in all three types of clove oils are eugenol, eugenyl acetate, and caryophyllene. However, these three types all vary in their eugenol content. For instance, clove leaf oil contains very low levels of eugenol, compared to clove bud oil. Oil derived from the clove stem contains the highest amount of the compound, which makes it unsuitable for external applications.

Benefits of Clove Bud Oil

clove bud oil benefitsClove oil owes much of its health benefits to eugenol,7 which make up to 90 percent of the oil. This compound provides potent antiseptic and anti-inflammatory benefits, and is also responsible for preventing cloves from spoiling.

Thanks to this chemical compound, this plant oil is very effective against dental pain, sore gums, mouth ulcers, cavities, and bad breath. It is because of the compound that clove oil, as well as other spice oils that contain eugenol (like cinnamon, basil, and nutmeg oils), are added to dental products, insect repellents, perfumes, foods, and even pharmaceutical products.

Eugenol also causes clove oil to have stimulating and warming properties, which make it a popular choice among aromatherapy practitioners. Part of its list of benefits is its ability to stimulate your metabolism by helping improve your blood circulation and lowering your body temperature. It can also contribute to your digestive health and address problems like hiccups, indigestion, motion sickness, and excess gas.

Apart from helping support your metabolism, clove bud oil can also help relieve stress and help lessen mental exhaustion. Some use it to tackle neural health problems, such as depression and anxiety. The oil can also work as an aphrodisiac and treatment for insomnia.

 Make Clove Bud Oil

Clove bud essential oil, including the other two forms of clove oil, is produced by steam distillation. However, you can also extract oil from clove buds at home.  Here’s an easy-to-follow guide from eHow.com:8

What You’ll Need

  • 4 fresh clove buds, crushed
  • 600 ML airtight bottleneck jar
  • Carrier oil, like olive oil

The Multiple Uses of Aromatherapy.


Cuts and Scrapes

A spray of diluted essential oils makes an excellent antiseptic. The germ-killing abilities of essential oils high in terpenes, such as tea tree, lavender, eucalyptus and lemon, increase when a 2-percent solution is sprayed through the air. The antiseptic quality of tea tree actually increase in the presence of blood and pus. Superficial cuts, scrapes and burns may also be treated with a salve. Although studies show that oils are antiseptic when diluted in an alcohol base instead of oil, this may sting in cases of an open wound. Tea tree, lavender, helichrysum, cistus, eucalyptus, rose geranium, sandalwood and rose repair skin damage and encourage new cell growth for faster healing.

Antiseptic Skin Spray
15 drops tea tree or eucalyptus
10 drops helichrysum
5 drops lavender
2 ounces distilled water
1/2 ounce grain alcohol or goldenseal tincture

Combine and shake well before each use to help disperse the oils. Spray as needed on minor cuts, burns and abrasions to prevent infection and speed healing.

Fungal Infections
Treat fungal infection with tea tree, lavender, eucalyptus, myrrh and geranium. Small amounts of peppermint relieve itching. Soak a compress in these essential oils diluted in vinegar, which also deters fungus, and apply to the affected area. A fungal powder is also appropriate to keep the area as dry as possible.

Antifungal Powder
1/4 cup bentonite clay
1 tablespoon goldenseal root powder
12 drops (1/8 teaspoon) each essential oils of:
tea tree
clove
geranium

Combine all the ingredients and powder the affected area liberally. For fungal conditions, such as athlete’s foot, an aromatic foot bath is a great treat.

Soak Those Pups
5 drops tea tree oil
5 drops sage
2 drops peppermint

Fill a portable basin or tub with hot water-or, better yet, sage tea. Add essential oils to water and soak for at least 15 minutes. For feet that sweat excessively, finish with a foot powder.

Rashes Caused by Poisonous Plants
The menthol in peppermint relieves the painful burning and itching of poison oak, ivy or sumac. A 2- to 3- percent dilution (12-24 drops per ounce) in vinegar or witch hazel provides blessed relief to nerve endings. Four cups of quick-cooking oats (they dissolve best) wrapped in a muslin cloth and/or one cup Epsom salts may also be added to a lukewarm bath, or mix a smaller amount and sponge on. Lavender and a few menthol crystals added to a tincture of jewelweed or sassafras are also helpful during the first stages of a reaction. Oil-based products aren’t usually recommended, although some people find that a lotion relieves itching during the later, dry stage of poison oak, ivy and sumac.

Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac Remedy
3 drops each:
lavender
helichrysum
Roman chamomile
geranium
cypress
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon vinegar
1/2 teaspoon menthol crystals
1 ounce calendula tincture

Combine ingredients. Apply externally as needed. When healing begins, apply externally 6 drops each stoechas lavender and cistus (diluted to 2 percent) in aloe gel or juice.
Herbal Adjuncts-Take liver herbs such as milk thistle, burdock and dandelion; avoid sweets and fruits. Take vitamin C and pantothenic acid.

Inflammation and Burns
For inflammation, immediately apply a cold herbal compress with an anti-inflammatory oil, such as chamomile, lavender or marjoram. The first step in treating burns and sunburns is to quickly immerse the area in cold water containing a few drops of one of these essential oils, or to apply a cold compress that has been soaked in that water. Lavender oil and aloe-vera juice promote new cell growth, reduce inflammation and stop infection. Aloe, which is so healing it has even been used successfully to treat radiation burns, also contains the natural “aspirin,” salicylic acid.

Sunburn Spray
50 drops (1/2 teaspoon) lavender oil
4 ounces aloe-vera juice
1 teaspoon vitamin E oil
1 tablespoon vinegar

Combine ingredients. Store in a spritzer bottle, and shake well before using. Use as often as needed to reduce pain and speed healing. Keep the bottle in the refrigerator for extra cooling relief.

Insect Bites and Other Critter Attacks
For mosquito or other insect bites that don’t require much attention, a simple dab of essential oil of lavender or tea tree provides relief. Chamomile and lavender essential oils reduce swelling, itching and inflammation, and together with tinctures of echinacea and plantain often prevent an allergic response. (If an allergic reaction does occur, take 1/2 teaspoon of echinacea tincture internally.)

First-Aid Remedy
3 drops each:
lavender
tea tree
German chamomile
helichrysum
1 ounce calendula infused oil

Mix together. This remedy is excellent for skin irritation, bites, stings, burns, inflammation, bruises or scrapes.

Adding essential oil and tincture to clay keeps the medicine reconstituted, preserved and ready for an emergency. As the clay dries it pulls toxins from stings and bites to the skin’s surface to keep them from spreading, while also pulling out pus or embedded splinters.

Clay Poultice
12 drops lavender essential oil
1 tablespoon bentonite clay
1 teaspoon each tincture of:
echinacea root
chamomile flowers
plantain leaves

Put clay in the container to be stored. Add the tinctures slowly, stirring as the clay absorbs them. Add lavender oil, stirring to distribute it evenly. Store poultice in a container with a tight lid to slow dehydration; it will last at least several months. If the mixture does dry out, add distilled water to reconstitute it.

Nothing is more annoying than trying to enjoy the outdoors while shooing away pesky insects. Many people don’t care for the smell of citronella, a traditional repellant, but this formula smells great.

Insect-Aside Bug Repellant
5 drops eucalyptus
2 drops orange
4 drops lavender
2 drops lemon
8 drops cedar
1 drop peppermint
1 drop clove
1 drop cinnamon
2 ounces carrier oil

Mix together and apply liberally. Keep out of eyes.

Few “creepy crawlies” can survive the following blend. Use for skin fungus, scabies or other nonspecific critters.

Cootie Oil
10 drops thyme linalol
3 drops lemon
5 drops lavender
5 drops rosemary
1 drop clove bud
1 drop cinnamon bark
2 ounces carrier oil

Combine ingredients. Apply as needed.

Herbal Adjuncts – Jewelweed leaves, garlic, black-walnut hulls and the lichen usnea are all specific against fungus, and can be used as an external wash or soak.

Source: www.oawhealth.com

 

Study Suggests Oregano Oil Works for Weight Loss and Inflammation


 

A new animal study shows that carvacrol, the active component of oregano oil, can actually prevent diet-induced obesity by modulating genes as well as reducing inflammation in white adipose tissue. Carvacrol (2-methyl-5-isopropylphenol) is a monoterpene phenolic constituent of the essential oil produced by numerous aromatic plants and spices such as oregano oil.

The main objective of the study was to investigate effects of carvacrol in mice fed with a high-fat diet, which is an important model and cause of modern day obesity, and to study the potential underlying mechanisms focusing on the gene expression involved in adipogenesis, thermogenesis and inflammation.

Male mice were divided in three groups: 1) those who were fed a normal diet, 2) those fed a high-fat diet,  and 3) those fed with a 0.1% carvacrol-supplemented diet. Body weight, visceral fat-pads (known as organ fat or intra-abdominal fat) and biochemical parameters were determined. Adipose tissue (connective tissue which stores fat) genes and protein expression levels were also assessed.  The mice fed with the  carvacrol-supplemented diet exhibited significantly reduced body weight gain, visceral fat-pad weights and plasma lipid levels (trygliceride and cholesterol levels) compared with mice fed with a high-fat diet.  Furthermore, the high-fat-diet induced up-regulations of adipose tissue genes and protein associated with the signaling cascades that lead to adipogenesis and inflammation but were significantly reversed by dietary carvacrol supplementation.

In summary, under experimental conditions carvacrol prevented obesity in high fat-diet fed mice by decreasing body weight, visceral fat-pad weights and lowering plasma lipid levels. The evidence obtained in this study suggests that carvacrol appears to inhibit visceral adipogenesis most likely by suppressing bone morphogenic protein-, fibroblast growth factor 1- and galanin-mediated signaling, and it also attenuates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in visceral adipose tissues by inhibiting toll like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and TLR4-mediated signaling.

It is significant to note that the amount of carvacrol used in the study is a typical amount that one would use when supplementing with oregano oil.  A 1500 calorie diet would need approximately 1.5 calories of carvacrol and a 2000 calorie diet would need approximately 2 calories.  If one is consuming 1500 calories per day he or she would need 166 mgs of carvacrol, or 222 mgs for a 2000 calorie diet.

According Byron Richards, CCN, “a key part of the weight gain problem for any person is that immune cells start having an inflammatory party within white adipose tissue, attracting even more immune cells and causing progressive inflammation.  This problem locks in the dysfunction of white adipose tissue and contributes to stubborn weight issues.  This is the first study showing that carvacrol can directly improve this difficult problem, helping break a vicious cycle.”

Five Scientific Studies Demonstrating that Oregano Oil is Effective in Alleviating Inflammation

The first study, published in the journal Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology, discovered that oregano oil significantly improved rat colitis, or inflammation of the colon. When compared to the control group, the oregano-treated rats showed much greater success in terms of visual disease signs such as ulceration and swelling,

In a second study, reported in the journal Mediators of Inflammation, thyme and oregano oils were used in conjunction and found to benefit colitis in mice. The oils reduced the levels of cytokines, biochemical traditionally associated with inflammation. The results found oil treatment led to lower mortality and reduced tissue damage in the animals.

A third study an investigation reported in the journal Phytomedicine examined the effects of carvacrol on liver regeneration. Carvacrol is one of the key active ingredients in oregano oil. Rats with their livers surgically removed were assigned to two different groups. One group was treated with carvacrol and the other served as the control group. The carvacrol group experienced noticeably increased liver-weight gain.

A fourth study found in Phytomedicine discovered that carvacrol protected the livers of rats that also had blood supply restricted to those organs. The investigators found that carvacrol was nontoxic to rat livers used in the study.

In the fifth and final study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that an active ingredient in oregano can cure additional instances of inflammation. This ingredient, known as beta-carophyllin (E-BCP), was administered to mice with inflamed paws. In seven out of ten experiments, there was a subsequent improvement in inflammation symptoms. Researchers believe E-BCP might be of possible use in treating osteoporosis and arteriosclerosis.  Beta-carophyllin works by docking on specific receptor structures in the cell-membrane – the so-called cannabinoid-CB2 receptors. The result is a change in cell behavior, inhibiting the cell’s production of phlogogenic signal substances. According to investigator Dr. Jürg Gertsch, E-BCP has been used to treat mice with swollen paws due to inflammations. In 70 percent of cases where the treatment had been administered, the swelling subsequently subsided.

Many of the oils available in today’s market are derived from non-oregano species, such as various types of marjoram as well as species of thyme. Julia Lawless, author of The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, says that the vast majority of oregano oil is not labeled correctly, because it is derived from thyme, that is Spanish thyme.  I  highly suggest using a cold-pressed pharmaceutical grade formula of Wild Organic Mediterranean Oregano with at least 79-80% carvacrol content such as  Oregasil.  This is the oregano oil that I suggest to clients as well as the one that our family uses.

Source: oawhealth.com