Early Menarche, Menopause Tied to Higher CVD Risk


Several reproductive factors contributed to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease among women, including early periods and early menopause, researchers found.

A history of hysterectomy was also linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease, reported Sanne AE Peters, PhD, and Mark Woodward, PhD, both of the University of Oxford in England.

However, history of oophorectomy, as well as age at first birth, had either no associations or only minor inverse associations with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the authors wrote in Heart.

They pointed to “increasing evidence” that in addition to traditional risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, smoking, and obesity, certain reproductive factorsmay be linked with later cardiovascular disease, though the evidence is “mixed and inconsistent.”

This cross-sectional analysis of UK Biobank data comprised 267,440 women and 215,088 men ages 40 to 69 without a history of cardiovascular disease. The authors found that during 7 years of follow-up, there were 9,054 cases of cardiovascular disease, 5,782 cases of coronary heart disease, and 3,489 cases of stroke. Women comprised about a third of cardiovascular disease cases, a little under 30% of coronary heart disease cases, and about 40% of stroke cases.

Examining demographic data for women, the mean age was 56, about half were from a higher socioeconomic bracket in the U.K., and 60% said they never smoked.

Results were mixed for certain reproductive factors and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The mean age for menarche was 13 years, and women who had their first periods prior to age 12 had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.30) than women who had menarche at a later age. Similar increased risks were seen for coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93-1.18) and stroke (adjusted HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.03-1.32).

 Sixty-one percent of women in the study were postmenopausal, with a mean age at natural menopause of 50 years. But early menopause was also linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.19-1.49), coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.10-1.51), and stroke (adjusted HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21-1.66).

Likewise, history of hysterectomy was linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.22) and coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.34).

Eighty-five percent of women had been pregnant, and 44% of women had two children, while 42% of men had fathered two children. Compared with women and men without children, there was a significantly higher risk of coronary heart disease in women (adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.05-1.40). But because these risks were similar among men (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.23), the authors concluded that “this is unlikely to be due to a biological cause.”

The authors suggested that, “More frequent cardiovascular screening would seem to be sensible among women who are early in their reproductive cycle, or who have a history of adverse reproductive events or a hysterectomy, as this might help to delay or prevent their onset of CVD.”

Early Menarche, Menopause Tied to Higher CVD Risk


More frequent heart screening for women may be useful

Several reproductive factors contributed to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease among women, including early periods and early menopause, researchers found.

A history of hysterectomy was also linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease, reported Sanne AE Peters, PhD, and Mark Woodward, PhD, both of the University of Oxford in England.

However, history of oophorectomy, as well as age at first birth, had either no associations or only minor inverse associations with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the authors wrote in Heart.

They pointed to “increasing evidence” that in addition to traditional risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, smoking, and obesity, certain reproductive factorsmay be linked with later cardiovascular disease, though the evidence is “mixed and inconsistent.”

This cross-sectional analysis of UK Biobank data comprised 267,440 women and 215,088 men ages 40 to 69 without a history of cardiovascular disease. The authors found that during 7 years of follow-up, there were 9,054 cases of cardiovascular disease, 5,782 cases of coronary heart disease, and 3,489 cases of stroke. Women comprised about a third of cardiovascular disease cases, a little under 30% of coronary heart disease cases, and about 40% of stroke cases.

Examining demographic data for women, the mean age was 56, about half were from a higher socioeconomic bracket in the U.K., and 60% said they never smoked.

Results were mixed for certain reproductive factors and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The mean age for menarche was 13 years, and women who had their first periods prior to age 12 had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.30) than women who had menarche at a later age. Similar increased risks were seen for coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93-1.18) and stroke (adjusted HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.03-1.32).

Sixty-one percent of women in the study were postmenopausal, with a mean age at natural menopause of 50 years. But early menopause was also linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.19-1.49), coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.10-1.51), and stroke (adjusted HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21-1.66).

Likewise, history of hysterectomy was linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.22) and coronary heart disease (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.34).

Eighty-five percent of women had been pregnant, and 44% of women had two children, while 42% of men had fathered two children. Compared with women and men without children, there was a significantly higher risk of coronary heart disease in women (adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.05-1.40). But because these risks were similar among men (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.23), the authors concluded that “this is unlikely to be due to a biological cause.”

The authors suggested that, “More frequent cardiovascular screening would seem to be sensible among women who are early in their reproductive cycle, or who have a history of adverse reproductive events or a hysterectomy, as this might help to delay or prevent their onset of CVD.”

Early menarche may predict overall obesity.


Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States, but little is known about the effect of reproductive factors. In a recent substudy of the Framingham Heart Study, researchers determined that earlier age of menarche is linked to overall obesity.

“The purpose of this study was to examine whether female reproductive risk factors — including onset of menarche, number of births over a lifetime (parity), onset of menopause and menopausal status — are all associated with indices of body fat composition,” researcher Caroline S. Fox, MD, MPH, of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, said in a press release.

Researchers analyzed 1,638 patients (aged 40 years or older; weighing less than 160 kg) from the multidetector CT (MDCT) substudy of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) from 2002 to 2005. The patients were offspring of the FHS and third-generation cohorts.

Besides female reproductive risk factors measured, the researchers also looked at visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) via MDCT.

To better understand the influences of body fat and female reproductive risk factors, the researchers also adjusted for covariates such as age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, hormone therapy use and menopausal status.

According to data, earlier age of menarche was associated with increased BMI, waist circumference, VAT and SAT (all P<.0001). The researchers wrote that for each 1-year increase in menarche age, VAT was 61 cm3 lower. However, this association of earlier menarche with adiposity measures was weakened after adjustments for BMI. Associations between adiposity and parity, besides menopausal age, were not statistically significant, they added.

Although postmenopausal women had increased BMI, waist circumference, VAT and SAT compared with premenopausal women, the researchers said this was due to increased ages among postmenopausal women.

“This research suggests that select female reproductive risk factors, specifically onset of menarche, are associated with overall adiposity, but not with specific indices of body fat distribution,” researcher Subbulaxmi Trikudanathan, MD, of Harvard Medical School, said in a press release. “Ultimately, the important question is whether female reproductive risk factors can be used to target lifestyle interventions in high-risk women to prevent the metabolic consequences of obesity and cardiovascular disease.”

The researchers suggest that further studies determine whether female reproductive factors can be used in lifestyle interventions among women at high risk for the metabolic consequences of obesity and CVD.

  • Source: Endocrine Today