WIKILEAKS: CIA’s Most Secret Weapon Is Time Machine From Vatican. 


Author Alfred Lambremont Webre explains secret programs.

 wikileaks  cia s most important tool  access to travel through time and space provided by the vatican

CIA’s most important tool, access to travel through time and space provided by the Vatican. Following the Wikileaks Vault7 release of documents revealing the CIA hacking tools used to spy on citizens via smartphones and smart TVs, the whistleblowing agency has forgotten to include the CIA’s most important tool, access to travel through time and space provided by the Vatican.

Author Alfred Lambremont Webre, who has written many books on time travel told the told Daily Star: “This leaked WikiLeaks information does not include the secret programs that permit humans to travel backward and forwards in time.”Webre claims that the CIA’s time travel technology known as “quantum access”, was provided to them by the Vatican back in the 1960’s. He also says that the Quantum Access is a deep secret within the hidden government that Wikileaks have chosen not to reveal.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/hbqYi1s-UBE

 

They Can See a ‘Stick of Butter from Space’ — The Billion Dollar Spy Agency You’ve Never Heard Of


While most Americans would consider the CIA, and perhaps the NSA, household names, one U.S. spy agency — whose headquarters surpasses the U.S. Capitol in size — has managed to keep to the shadows while possessing cutting edge tools of the surveillance trade.

Called the  National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), even former President Barack Obama didn’t know of its existence when he first took officedespite that the agency employs some 15,400 people.

“So, what do you [do]?” Obama asked a customer at a Washington, D.C., Five Guys hamburgers in May 2009.

“I work at NGA, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency,” he answered.

 “Outstanding,” then-president Obama asserted. “How long have you been doing that?”

“Six years.”

“So, explain to me exactly what this National Geospatial …” Obama asked, unable to recall the agency’s full name.

Timidly, the man replied, “Uh, we work with, uh, satellite imagery.”

“Obama appeared dumbfounded,” Foreign Policy’s James Bamford reports. “Eight years after that videotape aired, the NGA remains by far the most shadowy member of the Big Five spy agencies, which include the CIA and the National Security Agency.”

The NGA’s secretive identity belies the agency’s massive physical size and the scope of its surveillance activities, as Bamford continues,

“Completed in 2011 at a cost of $1.4 billion, the main building measures four football fields long and covers as much ground as two aircraft carriers. In 2016, the agency purchased 99 acres in St. Louis to construct additional buildings at a cost of $1.75 billion to accommodate the growing workforce, with 3,000 employees already in the city.

“The NGA is to pictures what the NSA is to voices. Its principal function is to analyze the billions of images and miles of video captured by drones in the Middle East and spy satellites circling the globe. But because it has largely kept its ultra-high-resolution cameras pointed away from the United States, according to a variety of studies, the agency has never been involved in domestic spy scandals like its two far more famous siblings, the CIA and the NSA. However, there’s reason to believe that this will change under President Donald Trump.”

Originally tasked primarily with cartography — before a mammoth expansion, the spy arm had been called the National Imagery and Mapping Agency — until a name and mission switch in 2003 gave the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency its name, with the hyphen allowing a three-letter acronym so enamored by the government.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, whose fondness for imagery intelligence became known when he served as a general during World War II, created the National Photographic Interpretation Center shortly before leaving office — an agency also later absorbed by the NGA.

Now, the NGA works in conjunction with the U.S. Air Force to analyze the staggering amount of data collected through aerial surveillance abroad — mostly by unmanned aerial systems, such as drones with high-powered cameras.

According to at least one source, as of 2013, the NGA was integral in the analysis of surveillance data pertaining to Iran’s nuclear capabilities.

Revelations on the depth and breadth of the Central Intelligence Agency’s domestic capabilities, long believed out of its territory, was exposed by Wikileaks Vault 7 recently to be on par with National Security Agency programs — so much so, analysts say it constitutes a duplicate Big Brother.

Data provided to the NGA by military officials has assisted in various U.S. operations in the Middle East by tracking vehicles believed responsible for planting improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, and for monitoring hot spots for insurgent breakouts.

But the NGA hardly only keeps to support operations, as David Brown — author of the book, “Deep State: Inside the Government Secrecy Industry” — explained,

“Before the trigger was pulled on NEPTUNE’S SPEAR, the mission to kill Osama Bin Laden, SEAL Team Six had access to a perfect replica of the Abbottabad compound where the terrorist mastermind was hiding. The details for the replica were gathered by the NGA, which used laser radar and imagery to construct a 3D rendering of the compound. How precise were its measurements and analysis? The NGA figured out how many people lived at the compound, their gender, and even their heights. But the NGA didn’t stop there: Its calculations also helped the pilots of the stealth Black Hawks know precisely where to land.”

With a combined budget request for 2017 of $70.3 billion, the National and Military Intelligence Programs — NGA falls under the latter — have seen a quickening of support from the authoritarian-leaning, pro-military Trump administration. This and additional factors — such as the astonishingly sophisticated equipment at the agency’s disposal — have ignited fears the NGA could be granted authority to bring its expert microscope into focus against the American people.

“While most of the technological capacities are classified, an anonymous NGA analyst told media the agency can determine the structure of buildings and objects from a distance, has some of the most sophisticated facial recognition software on the planet and uses sensors on satellites and drones that can see through thick clouds for ‘all-weather’ imagery analysis,” reports news.com.au.

Efforts to bolster NGA’s innovate staff pool ratcheted up on Thursday, as Business Wire reported,

“From navigating a U.S. aircraft to making national policy decisions, to responding to natural disasters: today’s U.S. armed forces rely on Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) to meet mission requirements. As the nation’s primary source of GEOINT for the Department of Defense and the U.S. Intelligence Community, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) depends on the National Geospatial-Intelligence College (NGC) to produce top-tier talent to deliver intelligence with a decisive advantage. Today, Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH) announced that it has been awarded a five-year, $86 million contract by NGA-NGC to lead the Learning Management and Advancement Program (LMAP) that will provide high-quality learning solutions to equip a diverse workforce with the knowledge and skills necessary to meet current and future GEOINT mission requirements.”

Bamford points out for Foreign Policy the Trump administration intimated a significant expansion of spying on mosques and Islamic centers, while others admonish said surveillance could put Black Lives Matter and other protest groups in the NGA’s silent crosshairs.

Of distinct concern for privacy advocates are drones with uncanny zooming capabilities — features used against U.S. citizens before. Bamford continues,

“In 2016, unbeknownst to many city officials, police in Baltimore began conducting persistent aerial surveillance using a system developed for military use in Iraq. Few civilians have any idea how advanced these military eye-in-the-sky drones have become. Among them is ARGUS-IS, the world’s highest-resolution camera with 1.8 billion pixels. Invisible from the ground at nearly four miles in the air, it uses a technology known as ‘persistent stare’ — the equivalent of 100 Predator drones peering down at a medium-size city at once — to track everything that moves.

“With the capability to watch an area of 10 or even 15 square miles at a time, it would take just two drones hovering over Manhattan to continuously observe and follow all outdoor human activity, night and day. It can zoom in on an object as small as a stick of butter on a plate and store up to 1 million terabytes of data a day. That capacity would allow analysts to look back in time over days, weeks, or months. Technology is in the works to enable drones to remain aloft for years at a time.”

With cutting edge technology, a rapid enlargement underway, and billions in budgetary funds at the ready, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is the cloaked, mute sibling of the nefarious Intelligence Community — but it’s time to pull the protective shell off this potential ticking time bomb before reining it in becomes an impossibility.

Source:http://thefreethoughtproject.com

 

Disturbing New WikiLeaks Dump Shows Just How Vulnerable We Are to Hacking


Article Image

Okay, so maybe Big Brother is watching you.

It turns out that even apps like WhatsApp, Signal, Confide, and Telegram, which are all seen as strong for privacy and encryption, are vulnerable to hacking. In a disturbing new revelation, we are learning that hackers may have the capability of capturing audio and messaging date before the encryption takes place.

Can you hear me now? (Yes.)

WikiLeaks logo (Fair Use)

In what may become the largest release of top-secret CIA information, WikiLeaks just released 8,761 documents and files that detail the agency’s extensive hacking tools. This initial data dump, referred to as Year Zero, is the first installment in what is being nicknamed Vault 7. If WikiLeaks’ assertions are Vault 7 are correct, the release would be a greater amount of information than gleaned from Edward Snowden.

Credit: Getty Images

While the CIA has not confirmed Vault 7’s authenticity, it has not currently issued a denial of its veracity. We also do not know if the stockpile derived from a former CIA employee or contractor, it whether Vault 7 itself derives from hacking by a foreign government.

Vault 7 is showing us just how vulnerable we are to hacking.

The long-term ramification from this latest WikiLeaks revelation could be an erosion of faith that our popular tech tools are secure. Whether it be using an iPhone or watching a show on a smart tv, we may become more skeptical that our tools are not being used against us.

Credit: Getty Images

There has been a low-running tension between consumers, the government, and the tech industry. Each group has their own interests, and they are often at odds.

The general public has a desire not to be hacked, and the government has a desire for hackable tech. The tech industry has a desire to make money, which typically involves ensuring consumers that their products will not be hacked.

This initial release by WikiLeaks showcases the tremendous amount of resources that the CIA has put into ensuring that our popular devices, whether they be Android or Apple, have certain back-door vulnerabilities. While it is generally understood that the government works with major tech companies to notify the company when a vulnerability has been found, this data dump by WikiLeaks implies that the CIA is not only not telling companies about vulnerabilities, but has also been actively pursuing to find and purchase additional flaws.

“Governments should be safeguarding the digital privacy and security of their citizens, but these alleged actions by the CIA do just the opposite. Weaponising everyday products such as TVs and smartphones – and failing to disclose vulnerabilities to manufacturers – is dangerous and short-sighted.” -Craig Fagan, policy director for the World Wide Web Foundation (speaking to the BBC)

Credit: Getty Images

The problem, of course, is what happens when bad actors exploit vulnerability flaws? The initial release of Vault 7 (Year One) seems to represent a playbook of sorts. That playbook is now out of the proverbial locker room.

“Those vulnerabilities will be exploited not just by our security agencies, but by hackers and governments around the world. Patching security holes immediately, not stockpiling them, is the best way to make everyone’s digital life safer.”-Ben Wizner, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, speaking to The New York Times

While companies like Apple are already asserted that they have patched the problems listed in WikiLeaks, it is our faith that our products are secure that may be more difficult to fix.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About The CIA Before Yesterday


10 Things You Didn’t Know About The CIA Before Yesterday

WikiLeaks’ Vault 7 release of Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents yesterday opened eyes worldwide about an agency President John F. Kennedy once vowed to “splinter…into a thousand pieces and scatter it into the winds.”

Here’s a comprehensive list of ten things we didn’t know about the CIA before yesterday’s leak.

1. The CIA has an illegal domestic spying apparatus similar to the NSA

Perhaps one of the most revealing things that we learned yesterday is that the CIA’s domestic surveillance capabilities rival and may well surpass those of the National Security Agency (NSA).

While both agencies were required under the Obama administration to report vulnerabilities found in hardware and software to manufacturers, each failed to do so – endangering national security and personal privacy by weakening encryption and in the NSA’s case installing backdoors in consumer electronic devices. Obama’s loophole of the disclosure was that the agencies didn’t have to disclose exploits found if it helped them.

In 2014, Michael Daniel, a former National Security Council cybersecurity coordinator and special adviser to the president on cybersecurity issues, told WIRED that the government doesn’t stockpile large numbers of zero days for use.

“There’s often this image that the government has spent a lot of time and effort to discover vulnerabilities that we’ve stockpiled in huge numbers … The reality is just not nearly as stark or as interesting as that,” he said.

The agencies did just that hoarding zero-day vulnerabilities, exposing systems to other malicious hackers  – whether they are foreign governments or criminals, violating the Consumer Protection Act.

In doing so, both agencies also violated the Fourth Amendment which protects against unauthorized search or seizure. The CIA admitted in 2014 to the Guardian that it was obliged to follow federal surveillance laws, laws that we now know both the NSA and CIA have broken an unfathomable amount of times.

The NSA itself violated surveillance restrictions thousands of times so the question must be proposed how many times did the CIA violate those surveillance restrictions?

How can Americans trust the CIA or the NSA, when the two agencies made us less safe by breaking the law and endangering private information such as bank account numbers and credit card numbers, by keeping security holes open in the devices of millions of Americans, just so they could exploit them. As security expert Bruce Schneier said back in 2013, “It’s sheer folly to believe that only the NSA can exploit the vulnerabilities they create.”

2. The CIA has a secret base in Germany

The CIA has a secret U.S. hacking base at the consulate in Frankfurt, Germany that it would disguise as State Department employees. The CIA even instructed its employees at the base how to avoid German security and gave them a cover story. This base is now under investigation by German authorities.

CIA hackers operating out of the Frankfurt consulate ( “Center for Cyber Intelligence Europe” or CCIE) are given diplomatic (“black”) passports and State Department cover. The instructions for incoming CIA hackers make Germany’s counter-intelligence efforts appear inconsequential: “Breeze through German Customs because you have your cover-for-action story down pat, and all they did was stamp your passport”

Your Cover Story (for this trip)
Q: Why are you here?
A: Supporting technical consultations at the Consulate.

3. The CIA has a cyber group dedicated to forging other countries digital fingerprints in false-flag attacks

The CIA has a secret espionage group called UMBRAGE that is dedicated to forging malware signatures of other countries including Russia.

The group collects and maintains a substantial library of attack techniques ‘stolen’ from malware produced in other countries.

With UMBRAGE and related projects, the CIA cannot only increase its total number of attack types, but also misdirect attribution by leaving behind the “fingerprints” of the groups that the attack techniques were stolen from – allowing them to create cyber false-flag attacks in which they can attack targets in the U.S. and blame another country for the resulting damages.

4. The CIA can spy on you through your smart TV and tap into the microphone

What was absent from Edward Snowden’s leaks was evidence of the ability for the NSA to spy on you through your smart TV. The CIA has found a way to do so through a program it called “Weeping Angel.”

5. The CIA can spy on you through any tablet or phone

While the NSA displayed similar capabilities to breach a phone or tablet’s security and hijack its camera or intercept text messages, the CIA proved it could do more.

Through it’s Mobile Devices Branch (MDB) they can exploit Android and Apple phones and tablets to do numerous attacks to remotely hack and control popular smart phones. Infected phones then can be instructed to send the CIA the user’s geo-location, audio and text communications, as well as covertly activate the phone’s camera and microphone.

6. The CIA can transcribe your Skype conversations

Kim Dotcom and 0hour explain how this is done in the following tweets.

7. The CIA has exploits for every major Anti-virus software provider and major personal computer software programs, including Microsoft Word, VLC, and all operating systems

Wikileaks notes that a program called Fine Dining provides 24 decoy applications for CIA spies to use. To witnesses, the spy appears to be running a program showing videos (e.g VLC), presenting slides (Prezi), playing a computer game (Breakout2, 2048) or even running a fake virus scanner (Kaspersky, McAfee, Sophos). But while the decoy application is on the screen, the underlying system is automatically infected and ransacked. This would allow CIA agents to pose as testing a company’s security and appear as if they were really an IT tech, when in reality they were pillaging data. Wikileaks also revealed that the CIA has exploits for Windows, Linux, and Mac OSX based systems as well as general software exploits for various applications on all three OS versions.

8. The CIA can hack vehicle control modules including cars, trains, and planes

Ex-FBI Head of Los Angelas Ted L. Gunderson said that the way that the elite get rid of people is through trains, cars and plane accidents. While the capabilities of hacking vehicles may not be something new, the evidence that the CIA has this capability warrants looking back at several suspicious incidents in the past few decades which raised flags as being possible assassinations rather than simple misfortunate accidents. Yesterday We Are Change reported on journalist Michael Hastings’ suspicious death, but many others that raise suspicion include John F. Kennedy Jr’s death and Senator Paul Wellstone – both powerful political dissenters that died in strange plane crashes.

9. The CIA has an air gap virus that can infect systems even if not connected to the internet

Air gapping is a technique this reporter personally learned about in 2015 when a whistleblower personally came to me with what sounded like insane information.

What is air gapping? Well it’s hacking a computer that isn’t connected to the internet.

Using the GSM network, electromagnetic waves and a basic low-end mobile phone through intercepting RF radio signals, researchers in Israel found they could extract data from computers, and Wired has now reported. Two weeks ago Wired reported that a drone has that type of capability, simply by watching a PC’s blinking led light – an incredible finding. Add that together with the CIA being able to implant malware and you have a dangerous weapon in the CIA’s hacking arsenal.

The CIA’s “Hammer Drill” infects software distributed on CD/DVDs, they have infectors for removable media such as USBs, and systems to hide data in images or in covert disk areas ( “Brutal Kangaroo”).

10. The CIA has a Meme Warfare Center. The meme war – is real.

The CIA actually has a meme warfare center which it uses to spread memes – giving cause for concern to anyone worried about government propaganda. Meme warfare is real, and the CIA has apparently been using it to spread disinformation. This is Operation Mockingbird in the 21st Century.


The CIA is not a friend to the people of the U.S., historically serving only the Wall Street and military-industrial complex elite. The CIA has been caught before spying domestically in the 1960’s – 70’s, including spying on journalists under Operation CELOTEX I-II and others in 702 documents called the “family jewels,” that catalog the agency’s domestic wiretapping operations, failed assassination plots, mind-control experiments and more during the early years of the CIA.

The CIA is the deep state, and it is dangerous.

The CIA Didn’t Just Torture, It Experimented on Human Beings.


Reframing the CIA’s interrogation techniques as a violation of scientific and medical ethics may be the best way to achieve accountability.

Human experimentation was a core feature of the CIA’s torture program. The experimental nature of the interrogation and detention techniques is clearly evident in the Senate Intelligence Committee’s executive summary of its investigative report, despite redactions (insisted upon by the CIA) to obfuscate the locations of these laboratories of cruel science and the identities of perpetrators.

The-CIA-Didn’t-Just-Torture-It-Experimented-on-Human-Beings

At the helm of this human experimentation project were two psychologists hired by the CIA, James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen. They designed interrogation and detention protocols that they and others applied to people imprisoned in the agency’s secret “black sites.”

In its response to the Senate report, the CIA justified its decision to hire the duo: “We believe their expertise was so unique that we would have been derelict had we not sought them out when it became clear that CIA would be heading into the uncharted territory of the program.” Mitchell and Jessen’s qualifications did not include interrogation experience, specialized knowledge about Al Qaeda or relevant cultural or linguistic knowledge. What they had was Air Force experience in studying the effects of torture on American prisoners of war, as well as a curiosity about whether theories of “learned helplessness” derived from experiments on dogs might work on human enemies.

To implement those theories, Mitchell and Jessen oversaw or personally engaged in techniques intended to produce “debility, disorientation and dread.” Their “theory” had a particular means-ends relationship that is not well understood, as Mitchell testily explained in an interview on Vice News: “The point of the bad cop is to get the bad guy to talk to the good cop.” In other words, “enhanced interrogation techniques” (the Bush administration’s euphemism for torture) do not themselves produce useful information; rather, they produce the condition of total submission that will facilitate extraction of actionable intelligence.

Mitchell, like former CIA Director Michael Hayden and others who have defended the torture program, argues that a fundamental error in the Senate report is the elision of means (waterboarding, “rectal rehydration,” weeks or months of nakedness in total darkness and isolation, and other techniques intended to break prisoners) and ends—manufactured compliance, which, the defenders claim, enabled the collection of abundant intelligence that kept Americans safe. (That claim is amply and authoritatively contradicted in the report.)

As Americans from the Beltway to the heartland debate—again—the legality and efficacy of “enhanced interrogation,” we are reminded that “torture” has lost its stigma as morally reprehensible and criminal behavior. That was evident in the 2012 GOP presidential primary, when more than half of the candidates vowed to bring back waterboarding, and it is on full display now. On Meet the Press, for example, former Vice President Dick Cheney, who functionally topped the national security decision-making hierarchy during the Bush years, announced that he “would do it again in a minute.”

No one has been held accountable for torture, beyond a handful of prosecutions of low-level troops and contractors. Indeed, impunity has been virtually guaranteed as a result of various Faustian bargains, which include “golden shield” legal memos written by government lawyers for the CIA; ex post facto immunity for war crimes that Congress inserted in the 2006 Military Commissions Act; classification and secrecy that still shrouds the torture program, as is apparent in the Senate report’s redactions; and the “look forward, not backward” position that President Obama has maintained through every wave of public revelations since 2009. An American majority, it seems, has come to accept the legacy of torture.

Human experimentation, in contrast, has not been politically refashioned into a legitimate or justifiable enterprise. Therefore, it would behoove us to appreciate the fact that the architects and implementers of black-site torments were authorized at the highest levels of the White House and CIA to experiment on human beings. Reading the report through this lens casts a different light on questions of accountability and impunity.

The “war on terror” is not the CIA’s first venture into human experimentation. At the dawn of the Cold War, German scientists and doctors with Nazi records of human experimentation were given new identities and brought to the United States under Operation Paperclip. During the Korean War, alarmed by the shocking rapidity of American POWs’ breakdowns and indoctrination by their communist captors, the CIA began investing in mind-control research. In 1953, the CIA established the MK-ULTRA program, whose earliest phase involved hypnosis, electroshock and hallucinogenic drugs. The program evolved into experiments in psychological torture that adapted elements of Soviet and Chinese models, including longtime standing, protracted isolation, sleep deprivation and humiliation. Those lessons soon became an applied “science” in the Cold War.

During the Vietnam War, the CIA developed the Phoenix program, which combined psychological torture with brutal interrogations, human experimentation and extrajudicial executions. In 1963, the CIA produced a manual titled “Kubark Counterintelligence Interrogation” to guide agents in the art of extracting information from “resistant” sources by combining techniques to produce “debility, disorientation and dread.” Like the communists, the CIA largely eschewed tactics that violently target the body in favor of those that target the mind by systematically attacking all human senses in order to produce the desired state of compliance. The Phoenix program model was incorporated into the curriculum of the School of the Americas, and an updated version of the Kubark guide, produced in 1983 and titled “Human Resource Exploitation Manual,” was disseminated to the intelligence services of right-wing regimes in Latin America and Southeast Asia during the global “war on communism.”

In the mid-1980s, CIA practices became the subject of congressional investigations into US-supported atrocities in Central America. Both manuals became public in 1997 as a result of Freedom of Information Act litigation by The Baltimore Sun. That would have seemed like a “never again” moment.

But here we are again. This brings us back to Mitchell and Jessen. Because of their experience as trainers in the military’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape (SERE) program, after 9/11 they were contacted by high-ranking Pentagon officials and, later, by lawyers who wanted to know whether some of those SERE techniques could be reverse-engineered to get terrorism suspects to talk.

The road from abstract hypotheticals (can SERE be reverse-engineered?) to the authorized use of waterboarding and confinement boxes runs straight into the terrain of human experimentation. On April 15, 2002, Mitchell and Jessen arrived at a black site in Thailand to supervise the interrogation of Abu Zubaydah, the first “high-value detainee” captured by the CIA. By July, Mitchell proposed more coercive techniques to CIA headquarters, and many of these were approved in late July. From then until the program was dry-docked in 2008, at least thirty-eight people were subjected to psychological and physical torments, and the results were methodically documented and analyzed. That is the textbook definition of human experimentation.

My point is not to minimize the illegality of torture or the legal imperatives to pursue accountability for perpetrators. Rather, because the concept of torture has been so muddled and disputed, I suggest that accountability would be more publicly palatable if we reframed the CIA’s program as one of human experimentation. If we did so, it would be more difficult to laud or excuse perpetrators as “patriots” who “acted in good faith.” Although torture has become a Rorschach test among political elites playing to public opinion on the Sunday morning talk shows, human experimentation has no such community of advocates and apologists.

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