There is a STRONG link between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and vitamin D deficiency


Image: There is a STRONG link between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and vitamin D deficiency

It seems that the sky’s the limit when it comes to the toxic effects of BPA and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals. BPA and similar chemicals are known for their deleterious effects on the endocrine system,  cardiovascular system, and their ability to cause infertility and more. But recent research has shown that the hazards of BPA and other endocrine disruptors can even cause vitamin D deficiency — which can cause a whole host of other health issues.

Time and time again, big businesses manage to get their toxic chemicals approved by governing officials. And it is only after these toxins have become persistent in our environment, and exposure has become inevitable, that the true, sinister nature of these poisons is revealed.

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D is an extremely important nutrient that is responsible for many functions in the body. In addition to promoting bone health, vitamin D is highly regarded for its brain and immune system benefits. Consequently, deficiency in this nutrient is quite the concern. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an array of problems, including deficits in brain function and increased mortality risk. Vitamin D deficiency is something you want to avoid, to say the least.

A study by the Endocrine Society has shown that in addition to all the other ill effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) like BPA, these toxins can cause vitamin D deficiency, too. Published in 2016, the Society’s examination of over 1300 studies on EDCs also found links to infertility, obesity, diabetes, neurological problems and hormone-related cancers, among other ails.

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Lauren Johns, MPH, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and the study’s first author, commented on the research.

“Nearly every person on the planet is exposed to BPA and another class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals called phthalates, so the possibility that these chemicals may even slightly reduce vitamin D levels has widespread implications for public health,” she explained.

“Vitamin D plays a broad role in maintaining bone and muscle health. In addition, low vitamin D levels have been implicated in outcomes of numerous conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer,” Johns added.

Based on the team’s findings, people exposed to large amounts of EDCs are more prone to vitamin D deficiency — with women being more strongly affected than then men.

Professor John D. Meeker, MS, ScD, and senior author of the study, stated that more research is needed to understand how EDCs disrupt vitamin D levels. Meeker posited, “[B]ut it is possible that EDCs alter the active form of vitamin D in the body through some of the same mechanisms that they use to impact similar reproductive and thyroid hormones.” However, this is only a theory so far.

Hidden danger: EDCs are everywhere

As Natural Health 365 reports, EDCs like BPA are everywhere. There are over 85,000 manufactured chemicals on the market today, and many thousands of those are EDCs. BPA can be found in everything from water bottles to dental fillings, and is also used in medical devices, eyeglass lenses, sports equipment and and array of electronics. And that’s just one chemical — there are many other hormone-disrupting chemicals out there.

Phthalates, for example, are used in a litany of products, including personal care products, cosmetics, food packaging and more. Phthalates are also known for their ability to disrupt endocrine function and other adverse effects. Some ways you can reduce exposure to these compounds include choosing products that are BPA- and phthalate-free. Selecting glass, ceramic or other natural materials over plastic when possible is another tip.

Could BPA Be the Reason Why Many Women are Infertile?


Bisphenol A

Bisphenol A (BPA), which is a chemical used to harden plastic and line food containers, may be harming women’s eggs.

Evidence links exposure to the chemical to a lower quality among eggs retrieved for in vitro fertilization. A study found that as blood levels of BPA in the women studied doubled, the percentage of eggs fertilized normally declined by 50 percent.

UPI reports:

“The researchers noted BPA — found in the urine of nearly everyone tested in a 2004 U.S. analysis — is an endocrine disruptor that either mimics or blocks body hormones.”

Dr. Mercola’s Comments:

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the world’s highest production-volume chemicals and as a result of its widespread use has been found in more than 90 percent of Americans tested.

Of 115 published animal studies, 81 percent found significant health effects from even low-level exposure to BPA, and many of these involve reproductive and fertility problems.

In the latest study, women undergoing in vitro fertilization who had higher levels of BPA in their blood had 50 percent fewer fertilized eggs, which suggests the chemical is compromising the quality of women’s eggs and perhaps contributing significantly to fertility problems.

How Does BPA Harm Your Fertility?

BPA is an endocrine disrupter, which means it mimics or interferes with your body’s hormones and “disrupts” your endocrine system.

The glands of your endocrine system and the hormones they release influence almost every cell, organ, and function of your body. It is instrumental in regulating mood, growth and development, tissue function, metabolism, as well as sexual function and reproductive processes.

Chemicals like BPA can exert their effects by:

  • Mimicking the biological activity of your hormones by binding to a cellular receptor. This can initiate your cell’s normal response to the naturally occurring hormone at the wrong time or to an excessive extent (agonistic effect).
  • Binding to the receptor but not activating it. Instead the presence of the chemical on the receptor prevents binding of the natural hormone (antagonistic effect).
  • Binding to transport proteins in your blood, thus altering the amounts of natural hormones that are present in your blood circulation.
  • Interfering with the metabolic processes in your body, affecting the synthesis or breakdown rates of your natural hormones.

The strongest evidence showing that exposure to environmental chemicals like BPA can lead to disruption of endocrine function comes from bizarre changes seen in a number of wildlife species, such as intersex fish, frogs developing a variety of defects like multiple testes or ovaries, and hermaphrodite bears, just to name a few.

But evidence is also very strong showing these chemicals are influencing humans, too, and leading to decreased sperm quality, early puberty, stimulation of mammary gland development, disrupted reproductive cycles and ovarian dysfunction, among numerous other health problems, like cancer and heart disease, as well.

What We Can Learn from History: The DES Disaster

During the 1950s and 1960s, the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) was prescribed to 5 million pregnant women for the prevention of spontaneous abortion.

Many of these children ended up with physical deformities and developmental abnormalities, and some of the girls developed an unusual form of vaginal cancer when they reached puberty.

It was later found that exposure to DES alters the expression of HOXA10, a gene necessary for uterine development, while increasing the risk of cancer and pregnancy complications.

When studying the offspring of mice that had been injected with DES during pregnancy, researchers found changes in certain regions of the HOXA10 gene that persisted into adulthood.

This indicates that exposure to DES and similar substances results in lasting genetic memory, known as “imprinting,” which is actually changing the structure of the HOXA10 gene.

Consequently, DES was banned in the 1970s, but the damage still lingers, and in some cases keeps showing up even in second-generation babies. And, although DES is no longer on the market, similar substances with estrogen-like properties — such as BPA — are.

How to Reduce Your Exposure to BPA

BPA in baby bottles has already been banned in Canada and several U.S. states. Other measures are being considered in 30 U.S. states and municipalities — but at a federal level, the government is treading water and choosing to protect the interests of the chemical industry in favor of public health.

So for now the chemical is still widely used and found in such products as:

  • Plastic water bottles
  • Plastic gallon milk bottles
  • Plastic microwavable plates, ovenware, and utensils
  • Baby toys, bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups
  • Canned foods and soda cans (most have plastic lining in the cans)
  • Tooth sealants

Avoiding BPA is therefore a matter of steering clear of these products by following these 11 tips:

  1. Only use glass baby bottles and dishes for your baby.
  2. Get rid of your plastic dishes and cups, and replace them with glass alternatives.
  3. Give your baby natural fabric toys instead of plastic ones, and only BPA-free pacifiers and teethers.
  4. Store your food and beverages in glass — NOT plastic — containers. Glass is the safest and most inert way to store your water and food, and is far better than ANY plastic (even BPA-free varieties).
  5. IF you choose to use a microwave, don’t microwave food in a plastic container.
  6. Use glass, ceramic, or stainless steel travel coffee mugs rather than plastic or styrofoam coffee cups.
  7. Avoid using plastic wrap (and never microwave anything covered in it).
  8. If you opt to use plastic kitchenware, at least get rid of the older, scratched-up varieties, avoid putting them in the dishwasher, and don’t wash them with harsh detergents, as these things can cause more BPA to leach into your food.
  9. Avoid using bottled water; filter your own using a high-quality filter instead.
  10. Before allowing a dental sealant to be applied to your, or your children’s, teeth, ask your dentist to verify that it does not contain BPA.
  11. Avoid using canned foods (including soda cans) as the linings often contain BPA. If you do eat canned foods, choose only those that come in BPA-free cans.

Fortunately, there has been enough negative press about BPA that the public has been demanding safer, BPA-free alternatives — and corporations have been responding.

Certain manufacturers, including Philips Avent, Disney First Years, Gerber, Dr. Brown, Playtex and Evenflow, have said they will stop making baby bottles that contain BPA, while several major retailers, including CVS, Kmart, Walmart, Toys R Us and Babies R Us are removing BPA-containing products from their stores.

So it is becoming gradually easier to find BPA-free alternatives for your family. Please support the companies that are moving in the right direction by removing this chemical from their products, and look for BPA-free labels on canned goods, baby bottles and children’s toys before you buy.

BPA Damages Chromosomes, Disrupts Egg Development


When a woman experiences a miscarriage or has a baby born with a birth defect like Down Syndrome, the cause is usually a mystery. Modern medicine simply does not have an explanation in most cases, although there are some clues coming in.

BPA Products

Story at-a-glance

  • An animal study found BPA exposure damaged chromosomes and interfered with egg development, which could lead to spontaneous miscarriage or birth defects such as Down Syndrome
  • In animals exposed to continuous low doses of BPA, there were not only problems with initial egg development, but also in the fetal eggs that were developing; the fetal eggs were not “packaged” properly in the follicles, which means they would have difficulty developing and maturing normally
  • Chemical exposures that we’re seeing today have the potential to impact not only your health, but they are also likely changing future generations to come, even if they’re not directly exposed to the chemical
  • One recent study found that pregnant rats exposed to dioxin passed on diseases to their third-generation offspring (or great-grandchildren) via epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, cellular changes that influence the expression of various genes
  • In order to avoid any number of chemical toxins leaching into your food and beverages, choose glass over plastic, especially when it comes to products that will come into contact with food or beverages, or those intended for pregnant women, infants and children

Environmental Chemicals Like BPA May Have Serious Reproductive Effects

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the world’s highest production-volume chemicals and as a result of its widespread use has been found in more than 90 percent of Americans tested. BPA is an endocrine disrupter, which means it mimics or interferes with your body’s hormones and “disrupts” your endocrine system.

The glands of your endocrine system and the hormones they release influence almost every cell, organ, and function of your body. It is instrumental in regulating mood, growth and development, tissue function, metabolism, as well as sexual function and reproductive processes.

The strongest evidence showing that exposure to environmental chemicals like BPA can lead to disruption of endocrine function comes from bizarre changes seen in a number of wildlife species, such as intersex fish, frogs developing a variety of defects like multiple testes or ovaries, and hermaphrodite bears, just to name a few.

But evidence is also very strong showing these chemicals are influencing humans, too, and leading to decreased sperm quality, early puberty, stimulation of mammary gland development, disrupted reproductive cycles and ovarian dysfunction, among numerous other health problems, like cancer and heart disease, as well.

In the latest study, researchers found disruptions to egg development after rhesus monkeys, which have human-like reproductive systems, were exposed to either single, daily doses of BPA or low-level continuous doses. The BPA appeared to damage chromosomes, which could lead to spontaneous miscarriage or birth defects.

In the group exposed continuously to BPA, there were not only problems with initial egg development, but also in the fetal eggs that were developing.1 The fetal eggs were not “packaged” properly in the follicles, which means they would have difficulty developing and maturing normally.

Washington State researcher Patricia Hunt noted:2

“The concern is exposure to this chemical that we’re all exposed to could increase the risk of miscarriages and the risk of babies born with birth defects like Down Syndrome. The really stunning thing about the effect is we’re dosing grandma, it’s crossing the placenta and hitting her developing fetus, and if that fetus is a female, it’s changing the likelihood that that female is going to ovulate normal eggs. It’s a three-for-one hit.”

Similar results have been revealed in humans, as women undergoing in vitro fertilization who had higher levels of BPA in their blood had 50 percent fewer fertilized eggs, according to one study, which suggests the chemical is compromising the quality of women’s eggs and perhaps contributing significantly to fertility problems.3

You May be Impacted by Your Great-Grandmothers’ Chemical Exposures

The statement that “no man is an island” is coming all the more true now that we’re seeing regular evidence that our health is intricately tied to the lives of not only our parents but also our grandparents and great-grandparents …The chemical exposures that we’re seeing today have the potential to impact your health for sure, but they are also likely changing future generations to come, even if they’re not directly exposed to the chemical.

One recent study found that pregnant rats exposed to dioxin, a known carcinogen and endocrine disruptor, passed on diseases to their third-generation offspring (or great-grandchildren) via epigenetic transgenerational inheritance, cellular changes that influence the expression of various genes.4 The great-grandkids had high rates of kidney disease, ovarian disease and early-onset of puberty, while males had changes in sperm.

As Scientific American reported:5

Scientists have long known that environmental exposures can cause genetic mutations. But now epigenetics experts are finding that some exposures seem capable of changing how genes are expressed, or turned on and off, without actually damaging the genes. These changes then can be inherited by future generations.

… ‘The cause of the higher rates of disease in these [third generation] animals was not due to direct exposure, but rather through transmission of changes in the code that regulates gene expression,’ said Abby Benninghoff, who specializes in epigenetics at Utah State University. She was not involved with the study.”

BPA is Disturbingly Common

Thanks to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) refusal to ban BPA from food packaging in the United States, the chemical will continue to experience steady growth in 2012, with an estimated 4.7 million tons set for production this year. This, in turn, will earn BPA manufacturers a handsome profit of $8 billion.6

So even though some forward-thinking manufacturers have removed BPA from their products, this chemical is still disturbingly common in food and drinks packaging, as well as in other places you probably wouldn’t expect, like thermal printer receipts. So we are all lab rats, in a sense, being subjected to BPA exposures with unknown consequences for ourselves and future generations, whether we like it or not. This is why it’s so important to boycott the common sources of BPA that you can control, such as:

  • Canned foods and soda cans
  • All BPA-containing plastics
  • Certain tooth sealants
  • Certain BPA-free plastics (which can contain similar endocrine-disrupting chemicals)
  • Thermal printer receipts and paper currency (while you can’t “boycott” these, seek to limit or avoid carrying receipts in your wallet or purse, as it appears the chemical is transferring onto other surfaces it touches. It would also be wise to wash your hands after handling receipts and currency, and avoid handling them particularly if you’ve just put lotion or have any other greasy substance on your hands, as this may increase your exposure)

In addition, one way to help protect yourself from the adverse effects of inevitable BPA exposure is by eating traditionally fermented foods, such as raw grass-fed organic kefir, organic fermented veggies like sauerkraut or kimchi, or taking a high-quality probiotic supplement. These foods contain “friendly bacteria,” some of which have the ability to break down BPA, as well as reduce your intestinal absorption of it.7

This is important for everyone, but if you’re pregnant, nursing or planning to become pregnant, avoiding BPA as much as possible becomes all the more crucial.

Switching to BPA-Free Products May Not be Enough …

As a result of widespread consumer backlash, many companies have rolled out “BPA-free” plastic products, ranging from bottles and sippy cups to reusable water bottles, meant to appeal to those health-conscious consumers looking to avoid toxins.

Unfortunately, this may be just a ruse, as studies now show another bisphenol, bisphenol-S (BPS), is now showing up in human urine concentrations at levels similar to those of BPA.8 This suggests that many manufacturers are simply swapping one bisphenol for another. Research suggests BPS has similar hormone-mimicking characteristics as BPA, but it may be significantly less biodegradable, and more heat-stable and photo-resistant, which means it may cause even more health and environmental damage over time.

If you’re interested in avoiding any number of chemical toxins leaching into your food and beverages, choose glass over plastic, especially when it comes to products that will come into contact with food or beverages, or those intended for pregnant women, infants and children. This applies to canned goods as well, which are a major source of BPA (and possibly other chemicals) exposure, so whenever you can, choose jarred goods over canned goods, or opt for fresh instead. Another good idea is to ditch plastic teething toys for your little ones and choose natural wood or fabric varieties instead.

What’s Inside Industrial Epoxy? BPA and Somethin’ Garlicky


EPOXIES DATE BACK to the 1930s, when a Swiss researcher was experimenting with materials to use in making dentures. Since then, these versatile compounds have served as adhesives, coatings, and structural resins in everything from surfboards to airplane frames—wherever toughness and durability really matter. J-B Weld adhesive was invented by a truck mechanic as an alternative to torch welding, but this staple of DIY toolkits and Car Talk punch lines will form an industrial-strength bond on many surfaces. It comes in two separate tubes: a resin and a curing agent. Squeeze out equal amounts of each, mix, and let the chemical magic begin.

Bisphenol-A-(epichlorohydrin)
The resin in J-B Weld epoxy is bisphenol-A (yep, that BPA) combined with garlicky-smelling epichlorohydrin. Chemically, the molecule is a chain with little carbon-and-oxygen triangles, called epoxide rings, on the ends. That’s where the sticky action happens.

Crystalline Silica
Basically quartz. It’s added to the resin for body and viscosity, without which the goop would be too fluid to adhere and set properly—more like J-B Melt.

Carbon Black
The name says it all. Made up of sooty bits often produced by burning hydrocarbons, it gives the resin its inky color.

Calcium Carbonate
A cheap filler, found in both the resin and the hardener. Like the silica, it gives the product more volume while decreasing the cost per ounce.

Tetraethylene­pentamine
This is the curing agent. It contains amine groups that break open the epoxide rings so their carbons can hook up with the amine’s nitrogen. One TEPA molecule can lock onto four epoxy resin chains, and the other ends of those chains can bond to other TEPA molecules. All that cross-linking forms a super-strong network structure—a thermoset polymer. When it hardens, J-B Weld can withstand forces of nearly 2 tons per square inch and temperatures up to 550 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

whatsinside.jpg

DMP-30
The curing agent on its own is kind of lackadaisical at opening the rings, so epoxies often use accelerators like this one. DMP-30 is short for 2,4,6-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol. It has a reactive hydroxyl group (–OH) hanging off the side that helps rip those epoxide rings open like Christmas presents.

Benzyl Alcohol
This colorless liquid modifies viscosity and acts as a solvent to help the curing agent disperse during mixing. Like DMP-30, benzyl alcohol also has a hydroxyl group that can trigger curing, so it’s put in the hardener tube.

Titanium Dioxide
This stuff adds more body to the mix, and it turns the curing agent a color-coded white. Mix with the black resin and you get that famous gray.

Barium Sulfate
More filler. BaSO4 is radiopaque, which is why they make you swallow it to x-ray your innards. Pro tip: Do not attempt this with J-B Weld.

90% of People Have Cancer-Causing BPA In Their System. Here’s How to Avoid It


Bisphenol-A, commonly known as BPA, is a chemical used to harden plastic. For the past 40 years, since its discovery, BPA products are everywhere. Seriously! Look around you, everything from water bottles to the linings of canned foods are ridden with BPA. With that, more than 90% of the Western population currently have traces of BPA in their bodies right now.

While many companies and databases have made serious strides to reduce the amount or use of BPA in their products, it is still a widely used plastic product. Avoid putting the health of yourself and loved ones at risk by educating yourself on the hidden BPA product culprits and how to avoid them for the betterment of your health.

The Dangers of BPA

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Prior to 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration claimed that BPA products classified as “safe”. However, as of late, animal studies and medical research have raised concerns on this categorization and expressed concerns for the potential side effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and hormonal balances – especially in women and children.

Upon contact with BPAs, your body treats this chemical like estrogen in the body. With that, pregnant women and children during critical stages of their development have been medically urged to avoid BPAs at all costs. Linked to issues like cancer, infertility, brain nervous system and cardiovascular abnormalities, obesity and diabetes (to name a few), BPAs toxicity to the human body is no joke.

Surprising Products Containing BPA

Despite the recent widespread awareness of BPAs chemical traces in every products, there is no shortage of surprises for where BPA may be hiding in your products. In fact, even if you make an effort to buy “BPA-free” food and beverage products, its uses have become so mainstream, that you may be unknowingly exposing yourself and loved ones to its toxins on a regular, potentially daily, basis!

Store Sales Receipts

Thermal paper receipts, ones that you get with every store transaction, can contain BPA as a component of the heat sensitive coating that allows for inkless printing. The reason? This coated paper technology provides consistently speedy and cost-effective printing.

According to the Danish Environmental Protective Agency, the traces of BPA found in receipt are relatively minor. While recent research has yet to prove that BPA is readily absorbed through the skin, it’s best to avoid these receipts whenever possible – plus, you’ll be doing the environment a huge favor in the process.

Plastic Cooking Utensils

Plastic, especially with consistent high heat, has the tendency to melt. With that BPAs can leach into your otherwise “BPA-free” foods. Be sure to buy either wooden or nylon cookware or if you must use plastic, only use it on extremely low heats or to simply mix cold ingredients.

Toilet Paper

According to a comprehensive Danish study, many mainstream toilet paper and recycled paper product brands contain BPA. Similar to store receipts, while the impact of BPA absorption on the skin remains highly understudied, it’s better to be safe than sorry and avoid rubbing hormone-disrupting BPA traces on genital areas.

The Importance of the EWG Database

The EWG has created the first comprehensive and easily searchable database of a whopping 16,000 processed food and drink packaging material that may contain BPA. The list is comprised of thousands of food and beverage items and categories, offering consumers unparalleled access to researched and dependable information.

Their mission is founded in the belief that consumers have the basic right to know what is in the foods they are purchasing and consuming on an everyday basis. What is more, the uncensored access to product information that may be compromising to their health! To find the scores of the products you have already purchased and make educated consumer choices in the future, head over to the EWG database: http://www.ewg.org.

Easy Tips for Avoiding BPAs

The EWG BPA product database has been instrumental to product awareness. But why stop there! Incorporate these simple and easy tips into your daily routine to ensure that you’re not consuming BPAs in excess or unknowingly.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/J-xv2UD9TxQ

BPA May Break Down into Fat in Human Body.


A new study suggests the long-held industry assumption that bisphenol-A breaks down safely in the human body is incorrect. Instead, researchers say, the body transforms the ubiquitous chemical additive into a compound that might spur obesity.

obese man

The study is the first to find that people’s bodies metabolize bisphenol-A (BPA) — a chemical found in most people and used in polycarbonate plastic, food cans and paper receipts — into something that impacts our cells and may make us fat.
The research, from Health Canada, challenges an untested assumption that our liver metabolizes BPA into a form that doesn’t impact our health.

“This shows we can’t just say things like ‘because it’s a metabolite, it means it’s not active’,” said Laura Vandenberg, an assistant professor of environmental health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who was not involved in the study. “You have to do a study.”

People are exposed to BPA throughout the day, mostly through diet, as it can leach from canned goods and plastic storage containers into food, but also through dust and water.

Within about 6 hours of exposure, our liver metabolizes about half the concentration. Most of that — about 80 to 90 percent — is converted into a metabolite called BPA-Glucuronide, which is eventually excreted.

The Health Canada researchers treated both mouse and human cells with BPA-Glucuronide. The treated cells had a “significant increase in lipid accumulation,” according to the study results. BPA-Glucuronide is “not an inactive metabolite as previously believed but is in fact biologically active,” the Health Canada authors wrote in the study published this week in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Not all cells will accumulate lipids, said Thomas Zoeller, a University of Massachusetts Amherst professor who was not involved in the study. Testing whether or not cells accumulate lipids is “a very simple way of demonstrating that cells are becoming fat cells,” he said.

“Hopefully this [study] stops us from making assumptions about endocrine disrupting chemicals in general,” he said.

The liver is our body’s filter, but it doesn’t always neutralize harmful compounds. “Metabolism’s purpose isn’t necessarily a cleaning process. The liver just takes nasty things and turns them into a form we can get out of our body,” Vandenberg said.
BPA already has been linked to obesity in both human and animal studies. The associations are especially prevalent for children exposed while they’re developing.

Researchers believe BPA does so by mimicking estrogen hormones, but its metabolite doesn’t appear to do so. In figuring out why metabolized BPA appears to spur fat cells, Zoeller said, it’s possible that BPA-Glucuronide is “hitting certain receptors in cells”.

Health Canada researchers were only looking at this one possible health outcome. “There could be other [health] impacts,” Zoeller said.

In recent studies BPA-Glucuronide has been found in human blood and urine at higher concentration than just plain BPA.

Industry representatives, however, argue the doses used were much higher than what would be found in people.

Steve Hentges, a spokesperson for the American Chemistry Council, which represents chemical manufacturers, said the concentrations used in which the researchers saw increased fat cells were “thousands of times higher than the concentrations of BPA-Glucuronide that could be present in human blood from consumer exposure to BPA.

“There were no statistically significant observations at lower BPA-G concentrations, all of which are higher than human blood concentrations,” he said in the emailed response.

Zoeller agreed the dose was high but said “the concentration is much less important than the fact that here is a group testing an assumption that’s uniformly been made.” Vandenberg said the range is not that far off from what has been found in some people’s blood.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the Health Canada study but couldn’t comment before Environmental Health News’ deadline, said spokesperson Marianna Naum in an email.

The agency continues to study BPA and states on its website that federal research models “showed that BPA is rapidly metabolized and eliminated through feces and urine.”
Health Canada, which was not able to provide interviews for this article, has maintained a similar stance to the U.S. FDA, stating on its website that it “has concluded that the current dietary exposure to BPA through food packaging uses is not expected to pose a health risk to the general population, including newborns and infants.”

However, the fact that Health Canada even conducted such a study is a big deal, Vandenberg said.

“Health Canada is a regulatory body and this is pretty forward thinking science,” she said. “Hopefully this is a bell that can ring for scientists working for other regulatory agencies.”

Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’?


Early Puberty

Story at-a-glance

  • Precocious puberty, which is the appearance of secondary sex characteristics like pubic hair or breast growth before age 8, or the onset of menarche before age 9, impacts at least 1 in 5,000 U.S. children, and the rate is on the rise
  • Early puberty is linked to emotional and behavioral problems, along with an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer, later in life
  • Environmental chemicals, and particularly estrogen-mimicking, “gender-bending” chemicals that easily leach out of the products that contain them, are a likely culprit; this includes phthalates, parabens, PFOA, bisphenol-A (BPA) and more (these environmental chemicals are also linked to other health risks like cancer and heart disease)
  • Among the best ways to avoid early puberty are to limit your child’s exposure (and your own during pregnancy) to hormone-disrupting chemicals and stress, as well as to optimize your child’s vitamin D levels and to encourage a regular exercise program.

Reaching puberty is a rite of passage that we’ve all been through, but children nowadays are reaching it earlier than ever before — a trend that has both health experts and parents alarmed.

Precocious puberty, which is the appearance of secondary sex characteristics like pubic hair or breast growth before age 8, or the onset of menarche before age 9, impacts at least 1 in 5,000 U.S. children, and the rate is on the rise.1

Even in the last three decades, children (particularly girls) are maturing at younger and younger ages (precocious puberty is 10 times more common in girls than in boys).

Puberty, Once the Norm at Age 15, Now Occurring in 7-, 8- and 9-Year-Olds

In the 19th century the onset of menstruation occurred around the age of 15. Now the average age of the first period, or menarche, is around 12. The time during and before puberty is one of rapid development and change, which is why even months matter when it comes to first menstruation. Before menstruation, girls will show beginning signs of development, such as breast “budding” and growth of pubic hair.

These signs are now becoming unsettlingly common among 7-, 8- and 9-year-old girls, to the extent that many health care providers, rather than labeling these children with a diagnosis that something is wrong, have simply changed the definition of what’s normal… but is it really “normal” for girls to mature at such a young age?

There are more questions than answers in the case of precocious puberty, but what is certain is that girls are developing earlier than they have even 10, 20 or 30 years ago.

One study in the journal Pediatrics revealed that by age 7, 10 percent of white girls, 23 percent of black girls, 15 percent of Hispanic girls and 2 percent of Asian girls had started developing breasts, with researchers noting:2

“The proportion of girls who had breast development at ages 7 and 8 years, particularly among white girls, is greater than that reported from studies of girls who were born 10 to 30 years earlier.”

Early puberty can set the stage for emotional and behavioral problems, and is linked to lower self-esteem, depression, eating disorders, alcohol use, earlier loss of virginity, more sexual partners and increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases. There is also evidence that suggests these girls are at increased risk of diabetes, heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer, later in life.

Environmental Chemicals a Likely Factor

Scientists have brought forth a number of potential explanations for the rising rates of early puberty, but one that deserves special attention is environmental chemicals, and particularly estrogen-mimicking, “gender-bending” chemicals that easily leach out of the products that contain them, contaminating everything they touch, including food and beverages.

As the featured New York Times article reported:

” …animal studies show that the exposure to some environmental chemicals can cause bodies to mature early. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupters, like “xeno-estrogens” or estrogen mimics. These compounds behave like steroid hormones and can alter puberty timing.

For obvious ethical reasons, scientists cannot perform controlled studies proving the direct impact of these chemicals on children, so researchers instead look for so-called “natural experiments,” one of which occurred in 1973 in Michigan, when cattle were accidentally fed grain contaminated with an estrogen-mimicking chemical, the flame retardant PBB.

The daughters born to the pregnant women who ate the PBB-laced meat and drank the PBB-laced milk started menstruating significantly earlier than their peers.”

This is an extreme case, but the truth is we are all part of a “secret experiment” of sorts, because hormone-disrupting chemicals are all around us. Bisphenol A (BPA), an industrial petrochemical that acts as a synthetic estrogen, is found in our plastics and our tin can linings, in dental sealants and on cash-register receipts. Laboratory tests commissioned by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) detected BPA in the umbilical cord blood of 90 percent of newborn infants tested — along with more than 230 other chemicals. As written in theNew York Times:

“One concern, among parents and researchers, is the effect of simultaneous exposures to many estrogen-mimics, including the compound BPA, which is ubiquitous.”

No one knows what happens when a developing fetus or young child is exposed to hundreds of chemicals, many of which mimic your body’s natural hormones and can trigger major changes in your body even as an adult, let along during the most rapid and vulnerable periods of development (in utero and as a young child).

BPA is, unfortunately, but one example. Others include phthalates, a group of industrial chemicals used to make plastics like polyvinyl chloride (PVC) more flexible and resilient. They’re also one of the most pervasive of the endocrine disrupters, found in everything from processed food packaging and shower curtains to detergents, toys and beauty products like nail polish, hair spray, shampoo, deodorants, and fragrances.

Other environmental chemicals like PCBs and DDE (a breakdown product of the pesticide DDT) may also be associated with early sexual development in girls. Both DDE and PCBs are known to mimic, or interfere with, sex hormones.

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), found in non-stick cookware, also falls into this dangerous category, as does fluoride, which is added to the majority of public water supplies in the United States. Research showed that animals treated with fluoride had lower levels of circulating melatonin, as reflected by reduced levels of melatonin metabolites in the animals’ urine. This reduced level of circulating melatonin was accompanied — as might be expected — by an earlier onset of puberty in the fluoride-treated female animals.

These Chemicals Also Increase Your Risk of Cancer and Heart Disease

If a chemical is capable of influencing the rate of your reproductive development, it stands to reason that it would be capable of influencing other hormone-sensitive growth processes as well, and this is indeed the case.

For instance, new research has detected the presence of paraben esters in 99 percent of breast cancer tissues sampled.3 Parabens are chemicals with estrogen-like properties, and estrogen is one of the hormones involved in not only puberty but also the development of breast cancer. They are widely used in household products such as:

Deodorants and antiperspirants Shampoos and conditioners Shaving gel Toothpaste
Lotions and sunscreens Make-up / cosmetics Pharmaceutical drugs Food additives

 

Recent research has also confirmed the existence of a previously unknown class of cancer-causing estrogen-mimicking compounds: metals. Yes, a broad range of metals have been shown to act as “metalloestrogens” with the potential to add to the estrogenic burden of the human body, thereby increasing the risk of breast cancer and also possibly early puberty. The following metals, which are added to thousands of consumer products, including vaccines, have been identified as being capable of binding to cellular estrogen receptors and then mimicking the actions of physiological estrogens:4

Aluminum Antimony Arsenite Barium Cadmium Chromium Cobalt
Copper Lead Mercury Nickel Selenite Tin Vanadate

 

Data from a long-running British health survey, meanwhile, has shown that if you have high levels of the chemical BPA in your urine, you may be at an increased risk of heart disease. Some of the greatest concern surrounds early-life, in utero exposure to BPA, which can lead to chromosomal errors in your developing fetus, causing spontaneous miscarriages and genetic damage. But evidence is also very strong showing these chemicals are influencing adults and children, too, and leading to decreased sperm quality, early puberty, stimulation of mammary gland development, disrupted reproductive cycles and ovarian dysfunction, obesity, cancer and heart disease, among numerous other health problems.

Avoiding Hormone-Disrupting Substances is Crucial for Children and Adults Alike

While young girls may show obvious signs of exposure to hormone-disrupting substances via early puberty, other signals are more insidious and may not show up until a disease is already present. Here are 11 measures you can implement right away to help protect yourself and your children from common toxic substances that could cause precocious puberty and other long-term health problems:

  1. As much as possible, buy and eat organic produce and free-range, organic meats to reduce your exposure to added hormones, pesticides and fertilizers. Also avoid milk and other dairy products that contain the genetically engineered recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST)
  2. Eat mostly raw, fresh foods. Processed, prepackaged foods (of all kinds) are a major source of soy and chemicals such as BPA and phthalates.
  3. Store your food and beverages in glass rather than plastic, and avoid using plastic wrap and canned foods (which are often lined with BPA-containing liners).
  4. Use glass baby bottles and BPA-free sippy cups for your little ones.
  5. Make sure your baby’s toys are BPA-free, such as pacifiers, teething rings and anything your child may be prone to suck on.
  6. Only use natural cleaning products in your home to avoid phthalates.
  7. Switch over to natural brands of toiletries such as shampoo, toothpaste, antiperspirants and cosmetics. The Environmental Working Group has a great safety guide to help you find personal care products that are free of phthalates, parabens and other potentially dangerous chemicals.
  8. Avoid using artificial air fresheners, dryer sheets, fabric softeners or other synthetic fragrances, many of which can also disrupt your hormone balance.
  9. Replace your non-stick pots and pans with ceramic or glass cookware.
  10. When redoing your home, look for “green,” toxin-free alternatives in lieu of regular paint and vinyl floor coverings.
  11. Replace your vinyl shower curtain with one made of fabric.
  12. Avoid non-fermented soy, especially if you’re pregnant and in infant formula.

Theo Colburn’s book Our Stolen Future is a great source for further investigation as it identifies the numerous ways in which environmental pollutants are disrupting human reproductive patterns. I believe it is one of the best resources on this topic and highly recommend it.

Vitamin D Also Linked to Early Puberty

It has been suggested that girls who live closer to the equator start puberty at a later age than girls who live in Northern regions. Since this indicates a potential connection with sun exposure, researchers decided to investigate whether vitamin D was, in fact, related. Upon measuring vitamin D levels in 242 girls aged 5-12, researchers from the University of Michigan School of Public Health found that those who were deficient were twice as likely to start menstruation during the study period as those with higher levels.5

Specifically, among the vitamin-D-deficient girls, 57 percent started their period during the study, compared to 23 percent with adequate vitamin D. However, researchers defined adequate vitamin D as ≥ 30 ng/mL, which is actually still a deficiency state! For optimal health, vitamin D levels should be a minimum of 50 ng/mL, which means the number of vitamin-D-deficient girls with early puberty was probably much higher than the study reported.

The earlier you enter puberty, the longer you’re exposed to elevated levels of the female hormone estrogen, which is a risk factor for certain cancers such as breast cancer. This has been the primary “link” between early puberty and cancer that has been explored, but it’s important to understand that vitamin D deficiency is also a major risk factor for cancer, heart disease and many other diseases. So it could be that some of the increased risks that come from early puberty are linked to low vitamin D levels.

 

What You Should Know About Obesity, Stress and Exercise

Obesity (which exposes girls to more estrogen because estrogen is both stored and produced in fat tissue) is another likely factor in early puberty. The New York Times reported:

“As Robert Lustig, a professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco’s Benioff Children’s Hospital, explains, fatter girls have higher levels of the hormone leptin, which can lead to early puberty, which leads to higher estrogen levels, which leads to greater insulin resistance, causing girls to have yet more fat tissue, more leptin and more estrogen, the cycle feeding on itself, until their bodies physically mature.”

As for stress, this, too, has been linked to early puberty, with girls whose parents divorced when they were between 3- and 8-years-old significantly more likely to experience precocious puberty. “Evolutionary psychology offers a theory,” the New York Timesreports. “A stressful childhood inclines a body toward early reproduction; if life is hard, best to mature young. But such theories are tough to prove.” Interestingly, in addition to avoiding environmental chemicals, obesity and stress, and optimizing your vitamin D, regular exercise appears to be one of the best known ways to help prevent early puberty.

Bisphenol A (BPA) Causes 100x More Harm Than Previously Imagined


Research: Bisphenol A (BPA) Causes 100x More Harm Than Previously Imagined

A new study reveals just how profoundly mislead we are about Bisphenol A and its analogs: they are at least 100x more toxic than we previously imagined.

An alarming new study establishes that the commonly used chemical bisphenol A used in tens of thousands of consumer products, and its lesser known but increasingly prevalent analogs,bisphenol S and F, are several orders of magnitude more disruptive to the endocrine systems of the developing male human fetus than previous toxicological risk assessments were capable of determining.

The new study was published in the journal Fertility and Sterility and titled, “A new chapter in the bisphenol A story: bisphenol S and bisphenol F are not safe alternatives to this compound.”

As we have documented extensively in the past, the authors of the new study raise concerns that as awareness of bisphenol A’s clearly demonstrated toxicity grows and it loses favor within the marketplace, manufacturers are increasingly substituting it with chemically similar bisphenol compounds whose toxicities are less well characterized. As a result, consumers who conscientiously buy ostensibly ‘BPA-free’ products are being mislead into thinking they are bisphenol free and therefore safe.

The new study employed an innovative ‘organotypic culture’ system that took tissue samples from mouse, rat and human fetal testis, in order to create an experimental model that would accurately reproduce some of the dynamics observable within in vivo (living organism-based) systems that are not ascertainable within conventional in vitro (cell-based) models. They termed this experimental environment the fetal testis assay (FeTA) system.

Disturbingly, they found:

“With the use of a culture system that we developed (fetal testis assay [FeTA]), we previously showed that 10 nmol/L BPA reduces basal testosterone secretion of human fetal testis explants and that the susceptibility to BPA is at least 100-fold lower in rat and mouse fetal testes.” [emphasis added]

In other word, the endocrine-disruptive effect of bisphenol A – particularly its ability to suppress the testosterone-mediated mascularization process during embryogenesis — may be at least 100 times more toxic than previously believed.

How so?

Conventional toxicological risk assessments of novel new chemicals like bisphenol A are invariably performed on rodents, with effects (lethal dose 50%/LD50) extrapolated to humans based merely on body weight differences. What these do not account for is the contrastingontological differences between cells of different species. Nor do these acute lethal response studies (LD50) account for the non-linear response between dose and effect (i.e. monotonicity).

An accumulating body of scientific evidence has forced an acknowledgment today that the low-dose effects of chemicals on hormonal systems include the following counterintuitive response: a lower dose may have more profoundly disruptive effects on our hormonal system than higher doses.

This concept may be so counterintuitive, that it begs for deeper explanation. For instance, if chemical compound X at 1 milligram induces programmed cell death within an exposed cell, and .01 milligram of compound X induces a phenotypal change in the cell consistent with cancer, it will be the latter effect (the lower dose) that may be more detrimental in the long term, as cell death follows with stem-cell mediated replacement of the damaged differentiated cell; whereas chemically-induced carcinogenesis may result in the death of the entire organism).

Case in point:

“Using the FeTA system, we previously reported that basal testosterone secretion by human testes was not affected by 10,000 nmol/L DES, but it was reduced by concentrations as low as 10 nmol/L of BPA. Conversely, 10 nmol/L and 100 nmol/L BPA did not affect testosterone secretion by both mouse and rat testes, and 10,000 nmol/L BPA was needed to observe a significant reduction (58).”

The researchers also noted that during the development of the nascent male human in embryogenesis exposure to bisphenols in the 6.5th and 14th gestational weeks – the window known to be critical for what is known as the ”masculinization programming window’ – these chemicals are likely contributing to the alarming worldwide increase in male reproductive disorders, such as such as “hypospadias [abnormally placed urinary hole], cryptorchidism [the absence of one or both of the testicles], incomplete development or agenesis of prostate and seminal vesicles, and reduction of the anogenital distance (AGD) [ the distance from the anus to the genitalia] and penis length.”

Clearly, conventional toxicology, where the assumption is that a higher concentration of a toxic substance is linearly connected to a higher quantifiable adverse response, is no longer realistic. Living systems are highly dynamic and complex and one can never predict how a xenobiotic chemical will affect it. Any biologically incompatible chemical, introduced at a critically important developmental window, could result in untold adverse effects. The point is to eliminate unnecessary exposures, instead of abiding by what regulators consider ‘an acceptable level of harm.’

Clearly, the time is now to call for a ban of bisphenol containing products. While 3.4 millions tons are produced annually, with 20% of this being used as epoxy resin to coat food and beverage metallic cans, we can no longer pretend, given the latest research, that this chemical is not causing massive damage to exposed populations. The researchers comment:

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely studied typical endocrine-disrupting chemical, and one of the major new issues is the safe replacement of this commonly used compound. Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are already or are planned to be used as BPA alternatives. With the use of a culture system that we developed (fetal testis assay [FeTA]), we previously showed that 10 nmol/L BPA reduces basal testosterone secretion of human fetal testis explants and that the susceptibility to BPA is at least 100-fold lower in rat and mouse fetal testes. Here, we show that addition of LH in the FeTA system considerably enhances BPA minimum effective concentration in mouse and human but not in rat fetal testes. Then, using the FeTA system without LH (the experimental conditions in which mouse and human fetal testes are most sensitive to BPA), we found that, as for BPA, 10 nmol/L BPS or BPF is sufficient to decrease basal testosterone secretion by human fetal testes with often nonmonotonic dose-response curves. In fetal mouse testes, the dose-response curves were mostly monotonic and the minimum effective concentrations were 1,000 nmol/L for BPA and BPF and 100 nmol/L for BPS. Finally, 10,000 nmol/L BPA, BPS, or BPF reduced Insl3 expression in cultured mouse fetal testes. This is the first report describing BPS and BPF adverse effects on a physiologic function in humans and rodents.

On a Brighter Note…

While chemicals like BPA represent a source of great harm, there is plenty of research revealing that we can mitigate and/or undo some of the damage associated with its ubiquitous exposure, when eliminating it all together is not an option. In line with our mission: Education Equal Empowerment, we have gathered up abstracts from the National Library of Medicine indicating the in-built resilience of biological systems to attenuate the adverse effects of these chemicals, such as:

  • Genistein: This phytocompound, found in physiologicallly significant concentrations in soy, red clover and coffee, is capable of reducing the adverse effect of bisphenol A exposure.Read Studies.
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid: This compound commonly found in health food stores has been found to mitigate bisphenol A-induced testicular toxicity. Read Study.
  • Probiotics: The beneficial bacterial strains Bifidobacterium breve and Lactobacillus casei reduce the intestinal absorption of bisphenol A. Read Study.
  • Folic Acid: This vitamin (albeit synthetic; choose folate whenever possible), has been found to attenuate the adverse epigenetic effects of bisphenol A, such as hypomethylation of DNA.Read Study.
  • Black Tea: This natural herbal compound reduces the adverse effects of bisphenol A on cells.Read Study.
  • Kimchi Probiotics: A bacterial strain in this fermented cabbage extract has been found to degrade bisphenol A. Read Study.
  • Royal Jelly: Produced by worker bees for the queen, this supernal elixir has been found also to inhibit the estrogenic and proliferative (potentially cancer-promoting) effects of bisphenol A. Read Study

Clearly, the best case scenario is avoiding exposure to bisphenols whenever possible. However, simply accepting a thermal receipt at a purchase, or consuming a meal whose ingredients derive from canned foods, makes avoidance a very difficult proposition. We hope that this research will foment a movement to pressure manufacturers and regulators to clamp down on the use of bisphenols.

10 Things to Know About BPA – Bisphenol A


There are 10 things about BPA each one of us should know to help us protect our most important resource – our children – from a number of horrible health conditions we would never wish on our worst enemies. These facts include information on health conditions caused by this substance along with practical steps that every mother can take to protect her children from this unnecessary, toxic substance.

First, we need to get a clear picture of what this substance is. BPA stands for “Bisphenol A.” Its name derives from the combination of carbolic acid, polystyrene, and acetone that comprise its molecular constitution. This chemical is heavily used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics. Since the 1930s, various scientists have questioned its safety. Recent studies have produced overwhelming evidence that this substance is both toxic and completely unnecessary.

Important Facts for Expectant and Young Mothers

This article focuses particularly on those things about BPA that make it particularly dangerous to women and children, even when ingested in low quantities.

1. BPA leaches into plastic baby bottles when they are heated in microwaves. 99 percent of all plastic bottles in North America contain BPA.

2. BPA exposure is so widespread that some studies are now finding effects in fetuses that appear to be related to this chemical.

3. BPA has been linked to breast cancer. Studies in China shows that it increases estrogen receptors that are known to play a role in hormone related cancers like breast cancer.

4. Infant brain development can be damaged by BPA. Dr. James Brown from the Mental Health Clinic at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine reported that “sufficient information now exists for a comparison of the neurotoxicological and behavioral pathology associated with exposure to BPA and other endocrine disruptors to the abnormalities observed in schizophrenia.”

5. BPA appears to cause early puberty in girls.

6. BPA is connected with obesity. It has been thought to increase body fat by speeding up the formation of fat cells.

7. Society does little to shield children from the effects of Bisphenol A. The powers that be appear to see children as little adults, not realizing that toxic chemicals can impair their growing bodies with more damaging results than they can produce in adults. Damage can being in the womb from the moment of conception if the toxins are present in the body of the mother.

8. In spite of all we know about BPA, the government still allows the linings of canned foods to be made with this chemical. Studies have shown that it leaches into foods stored in these cans.

9. BPA is not essential to industry. Baby bottles and food containers can be manufactured without it. There is nothing but pure profit motive behind its continued use—a profit motive that YOU do not have to financially support.

10. You can eliminate BPA from your world. You can replace plastic baby bottles with glass bottles, and you can stop using plastic food containers in the microwave. It goes without saying, too, that you will not need to worry about BPA in canned foods if you purchase only fresh, organic produce and natural, organic meats.

– Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

 

Article References:

  1. Julie Gabriel. 10 ugly facts about Bisphenol A (BPA). Green Tot Come. 2008 June 25.
  2. Department of Health and Human Services. Indirect food additives: polymers. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. 2012 July 17

10 Surprising Things to Know About BPA


Bishpenol A, or BPA is a common chemical which has been used since the 1930’s in the production of many kinds of plastics. These plastics naturally find their way into the home, especially in forms of water bottles, baby bottles and the like. The health risks associated with this chemical are real and serious and it is important to be education about BPA facts in order to make good consumer decisions.

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Baby Bottle Warning
Nearly all plastic bottles (approximately 99%) contain BPA and this includes baby bottles. If they are heated in a microwave, the BPA can leach into the baby formula or breast milk.

Fetal Exposure
Studies are showing links between certain fetal effects and BPA exposure. It is posited that this is partly because BPA is so widely used.

Breast Cancer Risk
Chinese studies have shown that BPA has been linked to increases in certain estrogen receptors. These increases constitute a risk factor for breast cancer.

Brain Development
BPA also has the potential to interfere with and disrupt the brain development of infants and young children. Such disruptions have been associated with disorders like schizophrenia.

Early Puberty
Increasingly, girls are beginning puberty at a younger age and this can lead to a variety of health and social problems. BPA has also been linked to this phenomenon.

Obesity Risk
As America struggles with its 75% overweight/obese percentage, it is still consuming many products tainted with BPA, which has been associated with weight gain.

Risk to Children
Children are at a particular risk for BPA exposure. This is because their brains and neurological systems are still developing and more vulnerable to effects from exposure.

Canned Food Problem
The government still allows BPA to be used in the manufacture of canned food linings. However, research has shown that BPA can leach into foods stored in these cans.

BPA is Nonessential
This chemical is not essential to the plastics industry. Bottles and other products can readily be made without it.

Eliminate BPA
It is possible to eliminate or limit exposure to this harmful chemical. Read below to find out what steps the average consumer can take.

Because the government and industry continues to exposure the public to this dangerous chemical, it is necessary for the individual to take steps to limit exposure. This can include substituting glass bottles and microwaveable containers for the plastic ones currently in use. Such glass products are available at most stores. It is also a good idea to eliminate canned food as much as possible from the diet and instead eat food that is fresh or cooked from dry products (such as cooking dry beans from scratch). It might seem like a lot of work, but it will also bring major health benefits along with it to reward those efforts.