World-Famous Physicist Drops Bombshell GOD Discovery… Atheists Will NOT Like This


Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku recently claimed that he found proof that God exists, and his reasoning has caused a stir in the scientific community.

 When responding to a question about the meaning of life and God, Kaku said that most physicists do believe in a God because of how the universe is designed. Ours is a universe of order, beauty, elegance and simplicity.

He explained the universe didn’t have to be this way — it could have been ugly and chaotic. In short, the order we see in the universe is proof of God.

“I have concluded that we are in a world made by rules created by an intelligence,” the physicist said, according to Science World Report. “Believe me, everything that we call chance today won’t make sense anymore. To me it is clear that we exist in a plan which is governed by rules that were created, shaped by a universal intelligence and not by chance.”

Kaku, one of the creators and developers of the revolutionary String Theory, came to his conclusions with what he calls primitive semi-radius tachyons, which are theoretical particles that have the ability to “unstick” matter or the vacuum space between particles, leaving everything in the universe free from any influence from the surrounding universe.

The physicist explained that God is like a mathematician, which is similar to what Albert Einstein believed.

These ideas will no doubt make atheist heads explode, because the more intelligent people come to accept that there is a God, the more atheists will look foolish.

Watch the video discussion. URL:https://youtu.be/Hi6yPJvCFU0

Source:http://mindszen.com

THIS is Why Genius Minds Always Wear The Same Clothes.


A human being is capable of processing about 70 gigabytes of information daily.Shocking huh?! Intelligent people who can use a higher percentage of their brain are known to consume a lot of information, which ultimately causes Option Fatigue. They get tired, and it hampers their decision-making power.

Steve Jobs

And it’s the main reason why the majority of intelligent and genius individuals – who are known to create history in the world through their many smart inventions – wear the same types of clothes every day.

GENIUS AND THEIR SAME CLOTHES

A neuroscientist and a cognitive psychologist, Daniel Levitin, shares that information overload takes place when humans process way too much information than their brain’s potential to consume.

Steve Jobs Wears Same Clothes

He further says that most humans think they are capable of paying attention simultaneously to nine things.

But this is not right. The conscious mind is capable of focusing on three things at a stretch. And when we start handling more than three things at once, we tend to deprive our mental prowess. This is the reason behind the geniuses of the world wearing the same clothes every single day – from Albert Einstein, Mark Zuckerberg to Steve Jobs and Barack Obama.

Steve Jobs wore the black turtleneck, Albert Einstein his gray suit and Mark Zuckerberg wears a gray t-shirt.

MARK ZUCKERBERG AND BARACK OBAMA

In one interview – Mark Zuckerberg – said that he organizes his life so that his decision-making power is reliable. Thus, he wears the same type of clothes every day, so that he does not have to worry about social issues or obligations. In a Vanity Fair interview in 2012 Barack Obama said that he wears either blue or gray suits.

Mark Zuckerberg

It helps him to reduce his decision-making tasks. He also shared that he does not want to worry about making decisions related to the things he eats or what he wears – as he has way too many important decisions to make in life as the President of America.

Albert Einstein

SMART USE OF OUR BRAIN

Our mind makes use of nutrients and energy in the same proximity as it uses to make vital decisions in life.

Most of the time, we make our mind worry about things that do not make any difference in our life. And when we have to make little decisions, our brain is too tired to do so. Therefore, it is necessary to make smart use of our brain.

Obama

Every human being has the same type of brain with similar strength and potential. However, only a few make smart use of their brain by focusing their energy on things that matter. So, wearing the same clothes deduces decisions and allows us to put our focus on things in life that will make a difference and help us to grow – professionally and personally!

Source:http://www.truthinsideofyou.org

How Einstein Changed the World


The fruits of one mind shaped civilization more than seems possible.

IN BRIEF
  • Einstein’s first major achievements came in 1905, when he published four groundbreaking papers, including his completion of special relativity.
  • Ten years later he expanded that theory to include gravity, creating general relativity. The idea toppled Isaac Newton’s physics and redefined our notion of space and time. It launched new strands of research that scientists are still pursuing and made its creator a star.
  • Over the past century Einstein’s ideas have intermingled with culture and art and shaped our world in infinite, indelible ways.

Albert Einstein once said that there are only two things that might be infinite: the universe and human stupidity. And, he confessed, he wasn’t sure about the universe.

When we hear that, we chuckle. Or at least we smile. We do not take offense. The reason is that the name “Einstein” conjures an image of a warm-hearted, avuncular sage of an earlier era. We see the good-natured, wild-haired scientific genius whose iconic portraits—riding a bike, sticking out his tongue, staring at us with those penetrating eyes—are emblazoned in our collective cultural memory. Einstein has come to symbolize the purity and power of intellectual exploration.

Einstein shot to fame within the scientific community in 1905, a year christened as his annus mirabilis. While working eight hours days, six days a week at the Swiss patent office in Bern, he wrote four papers in his spare time that changed the course of physics. In March of that year he argued that light, long described as a wave, is actually composed of particles, called photons, an observation that launched quantum mechanics. Two months later, in May, Einstein’s calculations provided testable predictions of the atomic hypothesis, later confirmed experimentally, cinching the case that matter is made of atoms. In June he completed the special theory of relativity, revealing that space and time behave in astonishing ways no one had ever anticipated—in short, that distances, speeds and durations are all relative depending on the observer. And to cap it off, in September 1905 Einstein derived a consequence of special relativity, an equation that would become the world’s most famous: E = mc2.

Science usually progresses incrementally. Few and far between are contributions that sound the scientific alert that a radical upheaval is at hand. But here one man in one year rang the bell four times, an astonishing outpouring of creative insight. Almost immediately, the scientific establishment could sense that reverberations of Einstein’s work were shifting the bedrock understanding of reality. For the wider public, however, Einstein had not yet become Einstein.

That would change on November 6, 1919.

In special relativity, Einstein established that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. This set the stage for a confrontation with Newton’s theory of gravity, in which gravity exerts its influence across space instantaneously. Driven by this looming contradiction, Einstein brazenly sought to rewrite the centuries-old rules of Newtonian gravity, a daunting task that even his ardent supporters considered quixotic. Max Planck, the dean of German science, intoned, “As an older friend, I must advise you against it…. You will not succeed, and even if you succeed, no one will believe you.” Never one to yield to authority, Einstein pressed on. And on. For nearly a decade.

Finally, in 1915, Einstein announced his general theory of relativity, which offered a profound recasting of gravity in terms of a startling new idea: warps and curves in space and time. Instead of Earth grabbing hold of a teacup that slips from your hand and pulling it to an untimely demise on the floor, general relativity says that the planet dents the surrounding environment, causing the cup to slide along a spacetime chute that directs it to the floor. Gravity, Einstein declared, is imprinted in the geometry of the universe.

During the 100 years since Einstein proposed the theory, physicists and historians have pieced together a coherent, if complex, story of its genesis [see “How Einstein Reinvented Reality,” by Walter Isaacson]. In some of my own general-level writings, I’ve had the pleasure of retracing Einstein’s climb, from elegant maneuvers to pieds en canard to his final summit. Far from demystifying Einstein’s creative leaps, however, perusing his process only adds luster to the astonishing novelty and overwhelming beauty of the proposal.

On November 6, 1919, four years after Einstein completed the general theory of relativity, newspapers the world over trumpeted just released astronomical measurements establishing that the positions of stars in the heavens were slightly different than what Newton’s laws would have us expect, just as Einstein had predicted. The results triumphantly confirmed Einstein’s theory and rocketed him to icon status overnight. He became the man who had toppled Newton and who, in the process, had ushered our species one giant step closer to nature’s eternal truths.

To top it off, Einstein made for great copy. While squinting in the limelight and paying lip service to an ardent desire for solitude, he knew how to entice the world’s interest in his mysterious but momentous dominion. He would throw out clever quips (“I am a militant pacifist”) and gleefully play the public part of the bemused genius of geniuses. At the premiere of City Lights, while the cameras on the red carpet flashed, Charlie Chaplin whispered to Einstein something along the lines of, “The people applaud me because everybody understands me, and they applaud you because no one understands you.” It was a role Einstein wore well. And the wider public, weary from World War I, embraced him wholeheartedly.

As Einstein glided through society, his ideas about relativity, at least the version broadly reported, seemed to resonate with other cultural upheavals. James Joyce and T. S. Eliot were splintering the sentence. Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp were cleaving the canvas. Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky were shattering the scale. Einstein was unshackling space and time from outmoded models of reality.

Some have gone further, portraying Einstein as the central inspiration for the avant-garde movement of the 20th century, the scientific wellspring that necessitated a cultural rethink. It’s romantic to believe that nature’s truths set off a tidal wave that swept away the dusty vestiges of an entrenched culture. But I’ve never seen convincing evidence pinning these upheavals to Einstein’s science. A widespread misinterpretation of relativity—that it eliminated objective truth—is responsible for many unjustified invocations of Einstein’s theories in the realm of culture. Curiously, Einstein himself had conventional tastes: he preferred Bach and Mozart to modern composers and refused a gift of new Bauhaus furniture in favor of the well-worn traditional decor he already owned.

It is fair to say that many revolutionary ideas were wafting through the early 20th century, and they surely commingled. And just as surely, Einstein was a prime example of how breaking from long-held assumptions could uncover breathtaking new landscapes.

A century later the landscapes Einstein revealed remain remarkably vibrant and fertile. General relativity gave birth in the 1920s to modern cosmology, the study of the origin and evolution of the entire universe. Russian mathematician Aleksandr Friedmann and, independently, Belgian physicist and priest Georges Lemaître used Einstein’s equations to show that space should be expanding. Einstein resisted this conclusion and even modified the equations by inserting the infamous “cosmological constant” to ensure a static universe. But subsequent observations by Edwin Hubble showing that distant galaxies are all rushing away convinced Einstein to return to his original equations and accept that space is stretching. An expanding universe today means an ever smaller universe in the past, implying that the cosmos emanated from the swelling of a primordial speck, a “primeval atom” as Lemaître called it. The big bang theory was born.

In the decades since, the big bang theory has been substantially developed (today the most widely held version is inflationary theory) and, through various refinements, has aced a spectrum of observational tests. One such observation, which received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, revealed that for the past seven billion years not only has space been expanding, but the rate of expansion has been speeding up. The best explanation? The big bang theory augmented by a version of Einstein’s long-ago-discarded cosmological constant. The lesson? If you wait long enough, even some of Einstein’s wrong ideas turn out to be right [see “What Einstein Got Wrong,” by Lawrence M. Krauss].

An even earlier insight from general relativity originated in an analysis carried out by German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild during his stint at the Russian front in the midst of World War I. Taking a break from calculating artillery trajectories, Schwarzschild derived the first exact solution of Einstein’s equations, giving a precise description of the warped spacetime produced by a spherical body like the sun. As a by-product, Schwarzschild’s result revealed something peculiar. Compress any object to a sufficiently small size—the sun, say, to three miles across—and the resulting spacetime warp will be so severe that anything approaching too closely, including light itself, will be trapped. In modern language, Schwarzschild had revealed the possibility of black holes.

At the time, black holes seemed far-fetched, a mathematical oddity that many expected to have no relevance to reality. But observation, not expectation, dictates what is right, and astronomical data have now established that black holes are real and plentiful. They are too far away for direct exploration at the moment, but as theoretical laboratories, black holes are indispensable. Beginning with Stephen Hawking’s influential calculations in the 1970s, physicists have become increasingly convinced that the extreme nature of black holes makes them an ideal proving ground for attempts to push general relativity forward and, most notably, to meld it with quantum mechanics [see “The Black Hole Test,” by Dimitrios Psaltis and Sheperd S. Doeleman]. Indeed, one of today’s most hotly debated issues concerns how quantum processes may affect our understanding of the outer edge of a black hole—its event horizon—as well as the nature of a black hole’s interior.

Which is all just to say that the centenary of general relativity is a far cry from a backward glance of historical interest. Einstein’s general relativity is tightly woven into the tapestry of today’s leading-edge research.

How, then, did Einstein do it? How did he contribute so much of such lasting importance? Whereas we can dismiss Einstein as the source of Cubism or atonal music, he is why we imagine that someone can, in the privacy of his or her own mind, think hard and reveal cosmic truths. Einstein was social as a scientist, but his big breakthroughs were solitary aha! moments. Did those insights emerge because his brain had an unusual architecture? Because of a nonconformist perspective? Because of a tenacious and uncompromising ability to focus? Maybe. Yes. Probably. The reality, of course, is that no one knows. We can tell stories of why someone may have had this or that idea, but the bottom line is that thought and insight are shaped by influences too numerous to analyze.

Eschewing hyperbole, the best we can say is that Einstein had the right mind at the right moment to crack a collection of deep problems of physics. And what a moment it was. His numerous but comparatively modest contributions in the decades after the discovery of general relativity suggest that the timeliness of the particular intellectual nexus he brought to bear on physics had passed.

With all that he accomplished, and the continuing legacy he spawned, there’s an urge to ask another speculative question: Could there be another Einstein? If one means another über genius who will powerfully push science forward, then the answer is surely yes. In the past half a century since Einstein’s death, there have indeed been such scientists. But if one means an über genius to whom the world will look not because of accomplishments in sports or entertainment but as a thrilling example of what the human mind can accomplish, well, that question speaks to us—to what we as a civilization will deem precious.

How Einstein Changed the World


Happy Birthday Einetein.

IN BRIEF

  • Einstein’s first major achievements came in 1905, when he published four groundbreaking papers, including his completion of special relativity.
  • Ten years later he expanded that theory to include gravity, creating general relativity. The idea toppled Isaac Newton’s physics and redefined our notion of space and time. It launched new strands of research that scientists are still pursuing and made its creator a star.
  • Over the past century Einstein’s ideas have intermingled with culture and art and shaped our world in infinite, indelible ways.

Albert Einstein once said that there are only two things that might be infinite: the universe and human stupidity. And, he confessed, he wasn’t sure about the universe.

When we hear that, we chuckle. Or at least we smile. We do not take offense. The reason is that the name “Einstein” conjures an image of a warm-hearted, avuncular sage of an earlier era. We see the good-natured, wild-haired scientific genius whose iconic portraits—riding a bike, sticking out his tongue, staring at us with those penetrating eyes—are emblazoned in our collective cultural memory. Einstein has come to symbolize the purity and power of intellectual exploration.

Einstein shot to fame within the scientific community in 1905, a year christened as his annus mirabilis. While working eight hours days, six days a week at the Swiss patent office in Bern, he wrote four papers in his spare time that changed the course of physics. In March of that year he argued that light, long described as a wave, is actually composed of particles, called photons, an observation that launched quantum mechanics. Two months later, in May, Einstein’s calculations provided testable predictions of the atomic hypothesis, later confirmed experimentally, cinching the case that matter is made of atoms. In June he completed the special theory of relativity, revealing that space and time behave in astonishing ways no one had ever anticipated—in short, that distances, speeds and durations are all relative depending on the observer. And to cap it off, in September 1905 Einstein derived a consequence of special relativity, an equation that would become the world’s most famous: E = mc2.

Science usually progresses incrementally. Few and far between are contributions that sound the scientific alert that a radical upheaval is at hand. But here one man in one year rang the bell four times, an astonishing outpouring of creative insight. Almost immediately, the scientific establishment could sense that reverberations of Einstein’s work were shifting the bedrock understanding of reality. For the wider public, however, Einstein had not yet become Einstein.

That would change on November 6, 1919.

In special relativity, Einstein established that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. This set the stage for a confrontation with Newton’s theory of gravity, in which gravity exerts its influence across space instantaneously. Driven by this looming contradiction, Einstein brazenly sought to rewrite the centuries-old rules of Newtonian gravity, a daunting task that even his ardent supporters considered quixotic. Max Planck, the dean of German science, intoned, “As an older friend, I must advise you against it…. You will not succeed, and even if you succeed, no one will believe you.” Never one to yield to authority, Einstein pressed on. And on. For nearly a decade.

Finally, in 1915, Einstein announced his general theory of relativity, which offered a profound recasting of gravity in terms of a startling new idea: warps and curves in space and time. Instead of Earth grabbing hold of a teacup that slips from your hand and pulling it to an untimely demise on the floor, general relativity says that the planet dents the surrounding environment, causing the cup to slide along a spacetime chute that directs it to the floor. Gravity, Einstein declared, is imprinted in the geometry of the universe.

During the 100 years since Einstein proposed the theory, physicists and historians have pieced together a coherent, if complex, story of its genesis [see “How Einstein Reinvented Reality,” by Walter Isaacson]. In some of my own general-level writings, I’ve had the pleasure of retracing Einstein’s climb, from elegant maneuvers to pieds en canard to his final summit. Far from demystifying Einstein’s creative leaps, however, perusing his process only adds luster to the astonishing novelty and overwhelming beauty of the proposal.

On November 6, 1919, four years after Einstein completed the general theory of relativity, newspapers the world over trumpeted just released astronomical measurements establishing that the positions of stars in the heavens were slightly different than what Newton’s laws would have us expect, just as Einstein had predicted. The results triumphantly confirmed Einstein’s theory and rocketed him to icon status overnight. He became the man who had toppled Newton and who, in the process, had ushered our species one giant step closer to nature’s eternal truths.

To top it off, Einstein made for great copy. While squinting in the limelight and paying lip service to an ardent desire for solitude, he knew how to entice the world’s interest in his mysterious but momentous dominion. He would throw out clever quips (“I am a militant pacifist”) and gleefully play the public part of the bemused genius of geniuses. At the premiere of City Lights, while the cameras on the red carpet flashed, Charlie Chaplin whispered to Einstein something along the lines of, “The people applaud me because everybody understands me, and they applaud you because no one understands you.” It was a role Einstein wore well. And the wider public, weary from World War I, embraced him wholeheartedly.

As Einstein glided through society, his ideas about relativity, at least the version broadly reported, seemed to resonate with other cultural upheavals. James Joyce and T. S. Eliot were splintering the sentence. Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp were cleaving the canvas. Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky were shattering the scale. Einstein was unshackling space and time from outmoded models of reality.

Some have gone further, portraying Einstein as the central inspiration for the avant-garde movement of the 20th century, the scientific wellspring that necessitated a cultural rethink. It’s romantic to believe that nature’s truths set off a tidal wave that swept away the dusty vestiges of an entrenched culture. But I’ve never seen convincing evidence pinning these upheavals to Einstein’s science. A widespread misinterpretation of relativity—that it eliminated objective truth—is responsible for many unjustified invocations of Einstein’s theories in the realm of culture. Curiously, Einstein himself had conventional tastes: he preferred Bach and Mozart to modern composers and refused a gift of new Bauhaus furniture in favor of the well-worn traditional decor he already owned.

It is fair to say that many revolutionary ideas were wafting through the early 20th century, and they surely commingled. And just as surely, Einstein was a prime example of how breaking from long-held assumptions could uncover breathtaking new landscapes.

A century later the landscapes Einstein revealed remain remarkably vibrant and fertile. General relativity gave birth in the 1920s to modern cosmology, the study of the origin and evolution of the entire universe. Russian mathematician Aleksandr Friedmann and, independently, Belgian physicist and priest Georges Lemaître used Einstein’s equations to show that space should be expanding. Einstein resisted this conclusion and even modified the equations by inserting the infamous “cosmological constant” to ensure a static universe. But subsequent observations by Edwin Hubble showing that distant galaxies are all rushing away convinced Einstein to return to his original equations and accept that space is stretching. An expanding universe today means an ever smaller universe in the past, implying that the cosmos emanated from the swelling of a primordial speck, a “primeval atom” as Lemaître called it. The big bang theory was born.

In the decades since, the big bang theory has been substantially developed (today the most widely held version is inflationary theory) and, through various refinements, has aced a spectrum of observational tests. One such observation, which received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, revealed that for the past seven billion years not only has space been expanding, but the rate of expansion has been speeding up. The best explanation? The big bang theory augmented by a version of Einstein’s long-ago-discarded cosmological constant. The lesson? If you wait long enough, even some of Einstein’s wrong ideas turn out to be right [see “What Einstein Got Wrong,” by Lawrence M. Krauss].

An even earlier insight from general relativity originated in an analysis carried out by German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild during his stint at the Russian front in the midst of World War I. Taking a break from calculating artillery trajectories, Schwarzschild derived the first exact solution of Einstein’s equations, giving a precise description of the warped spacetime produced by a spherical body like the sun. As a by-product, Schwarzschild’s result revealed something peculiar. Compress any object to a sufficiently small size—the sun, say, to three miles across—and the resulting spacetime warp will be so severe that anything approaching too closely, including light itself, will be trapped. In modern language, Schwarzschild had revealed the possibility of black holes.

At the time, black holes seemed far-fetched, a mathematical oddity that many expected to have no relevance to reality. But observation, not expectation, dictates what is right, and astronomical data have now established that black holes are real and plentiful. They are too far away for direct exploration at the moment, but as theoretical laboratories, black holes are indispensable. Beginning with Stephen Hawking’s influential calculations in the 1970s, physicists have become increasingly convinced that the extreme nature of black holes makes them an ideal proving ground for attempts to push general relativity forward and, most notably, to meld it with quantum mechanics [see “The Black Hole Test,” by Dimitrios Psaltis and Sheperd S. Doeleman]. Indeed, one of today’s most hotly debated issues concerns how quantum processes may affect our understanding of the outer edge of a black hole—its event horizon—as well as the nature of a black hole’s interior.

Which is all just to say that the centenary of general relativity is a far cry from a backward glance of historical interest. Einstein’s general relativity is tightly woven into the tapestry of today’s leading-edge research.

How, then, did Einstein do it? How did he contribute so much of such lasting importance? Whereas we can dismiss Einstein as the source of Cubism or atonal music, he is why we imagine that someone can, in the privacy of his or her own mind, think hard and reveal cosmic truths. Einstein was social as a scientist, but his big breakthroughs were solitary aha! moments. Did those insights emerge because his brain had an unusual architecture? Because of a nonconformist perspective? Because of a tenacious and uncompromising ability to focus? Maybe. Yes. Probably. The reality, of course, is that no one knows. We can tell stories of why someone may have had this or that idea, but the bottom line is that thought and insight are shaped by influences too numerous to analyze.

Eschewing hyperbole, the best we can say is that Einstein had the right mind at the right moment to crack a collection of deep problems of physics. And what a moment it was. His numerous but comparatively modest contributions in the decades after the discovery of general relativity suggest that the timeliness of the particular intellectual nexus he brought to bear on physics had passed.

With all that he accomplished, and the continuing legacy he spawned, there’s an urge to ask another speculative question: Could there be another Einstein? If one means another über genius who will powerfully push science forward, then the answer is surely yes. In the past half a century since Einstein’s death, there have indeed been such scientists. But if one means an über genius to whom the world will look not because of accomplishments in sports or entertainment but as a thrilling example of what the human mind can accomplish, well, that question speaks to us—to what we as a civilization will deem precious.

Is Our Understanding of Gravity Really That Wrong?


Albert Einstein was a brilliant man; there’s no denying it.  But, what he proposed about gravity, and what we have believed for a long time, may not be quite right. It was first proposed back in 2010, that gravity doesn’t work in the way that Einstein hypothesized, and there is now evidence to prove so. The study that was conducted was done on more than 30,0000 galaxies, and the new hypothesis that has arisen as a result is referred to as ‘Verlinde’s hypothesis of gravity’ after Eric Verlinde, creator of the hypothesis and theoretical physicist from the University of Amsterdam.

The problem with Einstein’s theory of gravity is that, even though it’s widely accepted throughout the physics community, it doesn’t account for everything within the universe. Verlinde, on the other hand, takes a different approach to tackling gravity. His idea is that gravity is a side effect of what is happening in the universe and not the cause. But, not much more had been done with the theory since 2010, until a team at Leiden University in the Netherlands decided to test the theory and came up with positive results. The testing involved analyzing the distribution of matter of 33,000+ galaxies and involved studying gravitational lensing, which is a tried and tested method of measuring dark matter.  However, the team discovered that is they just take Verlinde’s modified gravity theory into consideration; there was no need to factor in the idea of dark matter.

Upon comparing the results of the team’s testing and Einstein’s predictions, it was found that they both work. However, with Einstein’s theory and the presence of dark matter, four free parameters were needed to match the team’s observations, but with Verlinde’s theory, none were needed. Margot Brouwer, the leader of the research, says, “The dark matter model fits slightly better with the data than Verlinde’s prediction.  But then if you mathematically factor in the fact that Verlinde’s prediction doesn’t have any free parameters, whereas the dark matter prediction does, then you find Verlinde’s model is performing slightly better.” But, it will still be some time before Verlinde’s theory is accepted over Einstein’s (if ever), no matter how much proof there is. Brower goes on to say, “The question now is how the theory develops, and how it can be further tested.  But the results of this first test looks interesting.”

Theoretically Passing Through Space And Time In A Wormhole


Wormholes have nothing to do with earthworms, but are more like space tubes. A wormhole is a theoretical passage through space-time that could help people and things travel huge distances through space in short amounts of time. Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen proposed this theory in 1935; wormholes are also known as Einstein-Rosen bridges. According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, they mathematically should exist. But we have never actually observed one.

A wormhole, theoretically speaking, has two mouths connected by a throat that connects two different points in space-time. They may not only connect two points, but some theories about wormholes suggest they may also be able to connect two universes. So could we time travel in a wormhole like plenty of science-fiction movies suggest? Perhaps not, according to Einstein and Rosen’s theory, which states that a wormhole collapses quickly. New theories have emerged that suggest wormholes may stay open longer, but we’re far from having the technology required to find and use them. Learn more about wormholes in the videos below.

How Do Wormholes Actually Work?

This gets heady.

How Scientists Created A Wormhole In A Lab

Did it really work?

Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Wormholes And Black Holes

What’s the difference?

28 Nikola Tesla quotes to make you think


Nikola Tesla is often called the man who invented the 20th century, and there are lots of good reasons for that. He has become as famous, although at a later point, as many of his contemporaries, like Marie Curie and Albert Einstein.

Teslathinker

Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, engineer, and physicist, who is most well known for his invention of the modern generation of alternating current electrical power.

He emigrated to the United States in 1884 to work with Thomas Edison in New York City, but with his own financial backers, he was able to begin his own projects.

In the end, he died alone in the New Yorker Hotel of a coronary thrombosis. Recently, there has been a renewed popular interest in his life. Here are some of his quotes that we think will help challenge your ideas about science and the world at large.

1. Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. – American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm, 1870-1970 by Thomas P. Hughes (2004)

2. Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine. – A Visit to Nikola Tesla, by Dragislav L. Petkoviæ in Politika (April 1927)

3. In the twenty-first century, the robot will take the place which slave labor occupied in ancient civilization. – A Machine to End War, Liberty, February, 1937

4. Fights between individuals, as well as governments and nations, invariably result from misunderstandings in the broadest interpretation of this term. Misunderstandings are always caused by the inability of appreciating one another’s point of view. – The Transmission of Electrical Energy Without Wires as a Means for Furthering Peace, in Electrical World and Engineer (January 7, 1905)

5. The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter — for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way. He lives and labors and hopes. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy (The Century Magazine, June, 1900)

6. Peace can only come as a natural consequence of universal enlightenment. – My Inventions, in Electrical Experimenter magazine (1919)

7. The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind. – Radio Power Will Revolutionize the World (Modern Mechanix & Inventions, July, 1934)

8. Every living being is an engine geared to the wheelwork of the universe. Though seemingly affected only by its immediate surrounding, the sphere of external influence extends to infinite distance. – (Did the War Cause the Italian Earthquake) New York American, February 7, 1915

9. The last 29 days of the month are the toughest! – My Inventions, in Electrical Experimenter magazine (1919)

10. The individual is ephemeral, races and nations come and pass away, but man remains. Therein lies the profound difference between the individual and the whole. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy, in Century Illustrated Magazine (June 1900)

11. Though free to think and act, we are held together, like the stars in the firmament, with ties inseparable. These ties cannot be seen, but we can feel them. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy in Century Illustrated Magazine (June 1900)

12. I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success… such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, everything. – In Cleveland Moffitt, “A Talk With Tesla”, Atlanta Constitution (7 Jun 1896)

13. The spread of civilization may be likened to a fire; first, a feeble spark, next a flickering flame, then a mighty blaze, ever increasing in speed and power. – What Science May Achieve This Year, Denver Rocky Mountain News, January 16th, 1910

14. Of all the frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called ‘the greatest evil in the world’. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy, in Century Illustrated Magazine (June 1900)

15. Our senses enable us to perceive only a minute portion of the outside world. – The Transmission of Electrical Energy Without Wires as a Means for Furthering Peace in Electrical World and Engineer (January 7, 1905)

16. Three possible solutions of the great problem of increasing human energy are answered by the three words: food, peace, work. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy, in Century Illustrated Magazine (June 1900)

17. Our virtues and our failings are inseparable, like force and matter. When they separate, man is no more. – The Problem of Increasing Human Energy, in Century Illustrated Magazine (June 1900)

18. Money does not represent such a value as men have placed upon it. All my money has been invested into experiments with which I have made new discoveries enabling mankind to have a little easier life. – A Visit to Nikola Tesla, by Dragislav L. Petkoviæ in Politika (April 1927)

19. This planet, with all its appalling immensity, is to electric currents virtually no more than a small metal ball. – The Transmission of Electrical Energy Without Wires (Electrical World & Engineer, March 5, 1904)

20. Instinct is something which transcends knowledge. We have, undoubtedly, certain finer fibers that enable us to perceive truths when logical deduction, or any other willful effort of the brain, is futile. – My Inventions, in Electrical Experimenter magazine (1919)

21. The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. – Radio Power Will Revolutionize the World in Modern Mechanics and Inventions (July 1934)

22. It is paradoxical, yet true, to say, that the more we know, the more ignorant we become in the absolute sense, for it is only through enlightenment that we become conscious of our limitations. Precisely one of the most gratifying results of intellectual evolution is the continuous opening up of new and greater prospects. – The Wonder World To Be Created By Electricity, Manufacturer’s Record, September 9, 1915

23. Invention is the most important product of man’s creative brain. The ultimate purpose is the complete mastery of mind over the material world, the harnessing of human nature to human needs. – My Inventions, in Electrical Experimenter magazine (1919)

24. Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic! If static our hopes are in vain; if kinetic — and this we know it is, for certain — then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature. – Experiments With Alternate Currents Of High Potential And High Frequency (February 1892)

25. The progressive development of man is vitally dependent on invention. – My Inventions, in Electrical Experimenter magazine (1919)

26. Life is and will ever remain an equation incapable of solution, but it contains certain known factors. – A Machine to End War, Liberty, February, 1937

27. The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence.

28. Today’s scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. – Radio Power Will Revolutionize the World in Modern Mechanics and Inventions (July 1934)

These 5 crazy thought experiments show how Einstein formed his revolutionary hypotheses


Albert Einstein, one of the greatest minds of the 20th century, forever changed the landscape of science by introducing revolutionary concepts that shook our understanding of the physical world.

One of Einstein’s most defining qualities was his remarkable ability to conceptualise complex scientific ideas by imagining real-life scenarios. He called these scenarios Gedankenexperiments“, which is German for “thought experiments”.

Here are a few thought experiments that demonstrate some of Einstein’s most ground-breaking discoveries.

Imagine you’re chasing a beam of a light.

This is something Einstein started thinking about when he was just 16 years old. What would happen if you chased a beam of light as it moved through space?

If you could somehow catch up to the light, Einstein reasoned, you would be able to observe the light frozen in space. But light can’t be frozen in space, otherwise it would cease to be light.

Eventually Einstein realised that light cannot be slowed down and must always be moving away from him at the speed of light. Therefore something else had to change. Einstein eventually realised that time itself had to change, which laid the groundwork for his special theory of relativity.

Imagine you’re standing on a train.

Imagine you’re standing on a train while your friend is standing outside the train, watching it pass by. If lightning struck on both ends of the train, your friend would see both bolts of lightning strike at the same time.

But on the train, you are closer to the bolt of lightning that the train is moving toward. So you see this lightning first because the light has a shorter distance to travel.

This thought experiment showed that time moves differently for someone moving than for someone standing still, cementing Einstein’s belief that time and space are relative and simultaneity doesn’t exist. This is a cornerstone in Einstein’s special theory of relativity.

Imagine you have a twin in a rocket ship.

This thought experiment is a well-known variation of Einstein’s light-clock thought experiment, which has to do with the passage of time.

Let’s say you have a twin, born at almost the exact same time as you. But the moment your twin is born, he or she gets placed in a spaceship and launched into space to travel through the universe at nearly the speed of light.

According to Einstein’s special theory of relativity, you and your twin would age differently. Since time moves slower the closer that you get to the speed of light, your twin would age more slowly.

When the spaceship lands back on Earth, you might be trying to sort out your retirement, while your twin is just trying to get through puberty.

Imagine you’re standing in a box.

Imagine you are floating in a box, unable to see what’s happening outside of the box. Suddenly, you drop to the floor. So what happened? Is the box being pulled down by gravity? Or is the box being accelerated by a rope yanking it upward?

The fact that these two effects would produce the same results led Einstein to the conclusion that there is no difference between gravity and acceleration – they are the same thing.

Now consider Einstein’s previous assertion that time and space are not absolute. If motion can affect time and space, and gravity and acceleration are the same thing, that means gravity can actually affect time and space.

The ability of gravity to warp spacetime is a huge part of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

Imagine you’re tossing a two-sided coin.

Einstein wasn’t the biggest cheerleader for quantum theory. In fact, he was always coming up with thought experiments to try to disprove it. But it was these thought experiments that challenged the pioneers of quantum theory to perfect it down to its finest details.

One of Einstein’s thought experiments had to do with quantum entanglement, which Einstein liked to call “spooky action at a distance”.

Imagine you have a two-sided coin that can easily be split in half. You flip the coin and, without looking, hand one side to your friend and keep the other side for yourself. Then your friend gets on a rocket ship and travels across the universe.

Then you look at your coin. You see that in your hand you’re holding the heads side of the coin and instantaneously you know that your friend, who is billions of light years away from you at this point, is holding the tails side.

If you think of the sides of these coins as indeterminate, changing back and forth between heads and tails until the point in time that you look at one, then the coins can circumvent the speed of light, instantaneously affecting each other regardless of how many light years separate them.

Don’t Heed the Haters: Albert Einstein’s Wonderful Letter of Support to Marie Curie in the Midst of Scandal


“If the rabble continues to occupy itself with you, then simply don’t read that hogwash, but rather leave it to the reptile for whom it has been fabricated.”

Don’t Heed the Haters: Albert Einstein’s Wonderful Letter of Support to Marie Curie in the Midst of Scandal

Few things are more disheartening to witness than the bile which small-spirited people of inferior talent often direct at those endowed with genius. And few things are more heartening to witness than the solidarity and support which kindred spirits of goodwill extend to those targeted by such loathsome attacks.

In 1903, Marie Curie (November 7, 1867–July 4, 1934) became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize. It was awarded jointly to her and her husband, Pierre, for their pioneering research on radioactivity. On April 19, 1906, she was widowed by an accident all the more tragic for its improbability. While crossing a busy Parisian street on a rainy night, Pierre slipped, fell under a horse-drawn cart, and was killed instantly. Curie grieved for years. In 1910, she found solace in Pierre’s protégé — a young physics professor named Paul Langevin, married to but separated from a woman who physically abused him. They became lovers. Enraged, Langevin’s wife hired someone to break into the apartment where the two met and steal their love letters, which she promptly leaked to the so-called press. The press eviscerated Curie and portrayed her as “a foreign Jewish homewrecker.”

Upon returning from a historic invitation-only science conference in Brussels, where she had met Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879–April 18 1955), Curie found an angry mob in front of her home in Paris. She and her daughters were forced to stay with a family friend.

At the 1911 Solvay Conference. Curie leaning on table. Einstein second from right. Also in attendance: Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, and Ernest Rutherford.
At the 1911 Solvay Conference. Curie leaning on table. Einstein second from right. Also in attendance: Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, and Ernest Rutherford.

Einstein considered Curie “an unpretentious honest person” with a “sparkling intelligence.” When he got news of the scandal, he was outraged by the tastelessness and cruelty of the press — the tabloids had stripped a private situation of all humanity and nuance, and brought it into the public realm with the deliberate intention of destroying Curie’s scientific reputation.

A master of beautiful consolatory letters and a champion of kindness as a central animating motive of life, Einstein wrote to Curie with wholehearted solidarity and support, encouraging her not to give any credence to the hateful commentaries in the press. The letter, found in Walter Isaacson’s terrific biography Einstein: His Life and Universe (public library), is a testament to the generosity of spirit that accompanied Einstein’s unparalleled intellect — a masterwork of what he himself termed “spiritual genius.”

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Einstein, who would later remark that “Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted,” writes:

Highly esteemed Mrs. Curie,

Do not laugh at me for writing you without having anything sensible to say. But I am so enraged by the base manner in which the public is presently daring to concern itself with you that I absolutely must give vent to this feeling. However, I am convinced that you consistently despise this rabble, whether it obsequiously lavishes respect on you or whether it attempts to satiate its lust for sensationalism! I am impelled to tell you how much I have come to admire your intellect, your drive, and your honesty, and that I consider myself lucky to have made your personal acquaintance in Brussels. Anyone who does not number among these reptiles is certainly happy, now as before, that we have such personages among us as you, and Langevin too, real people with whom one feels privileged to be in contact. If the rabble continues to occupy itself with you, then simply don’t read that hogwash, but rather leave it to the reptile for whom it has been fabricated.

With most amicable regards to you, Langevin, and Perrin, yours very truly,

A. Einstein

Shortly after the scandal, Curie received her second Nobel Prize — this time in chemistry, for her discovery of the elements radium and polonium. To this day the only person awarded a Nobel Prize in two different sciences, she endures as one of humanity’s most visionary and beloved minds. The journalists who showered her with bile are known to none and deplored by all.

Complement with Kierkegaard on why haters hate and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for how to handle them, then revisit Mark Twain’s witty and wise letter of support to Helen Keller when she was wrongly accused of plagiarism and Frida Kahlo’s compassionate letter to Georgia O’Keeffe after the American painter was hospitalized with a nervous breakdown.

General relativity at 100


In November 1915, Albert Einstein put the finishing touches on his radical reinvention of space, time, gravity and the Universe itself. Throughout the following 100 years, experimenters have confirmed the general theory of relativity to ever-higher precision, and theorists have unravelled implications of it that even Einstein had not dreamed of, from black holes to the Big Bang. In this special collection and in a companion e-book, Nature celebrates the past triumphs of Einstein’s creation and the milestones yet to come.

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