Toxic Tooth—How a Root Canal Could Be Making You Sick


Tooth decay, dental

Root canal is a commonly performed procedure in most adults. But is it a wise one? Dr. Robert Kulacz, a dentist, has spent a significant portion of his professional career trying to answer this question.

What he discovered profoundly changed his life, and led him to write a book about his findings called, The Toxic Tooth: How a Root Canal Could Be Making You Sickwhich I think is among the best available on this subject.

Dr. Kulacz began practicing dentistry in Brewster, New York. After six years as an associate, he opened his own practice in Somers, New York in 1992, where he performed all the conventional procedures of dentistry, from restorations to extractions and root canals.

“I did a lot of root canals for many years,” he says. “Everything was going smoothly until one day, a patient of mine said to me, ‘You know, I heard from my physician that root canals may be bad; that root canals may cause or contribute to other diseases in the body.’

And I said, ‘You’re crazy. Who is telling you this? That’s impossible.’ He said, ‘You got to look at this information.’ He gave me websites of organizations like the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT) to look at.

I went on to explore this topic so I could come back to him and say, ‘Here is where you’re wrong, here’s where your physician is wrong, and here is where the American Dental Association (ADA) is right.’

Lo and behold, I found out they’re right; I was wrong.

I looked at Weston Price’s work, the work of Rosenow, and others. I decided to go to an IAOMT meeting… Dr. Boyd Haley’s lecture on root canals and how toxic they are changed my life. I realized I was wrong… From that day on, I changed my practice.”

The Importance of Informed Consent

Dr. Kulacz stopped performing root canals in 1995. He doesn’t promote a ban on root canals across the board, but stresses the importance of informed consent.

The American Dental Association states that root canals are a safe procedure that cannot cause any systemic diseases, and according to Dr. Kulacz and others who have spent time investigating the matter, that’s simply not true.

“If a patient is informed that these root canal teeth remain infected; that bacteria can indeed travel to other sites in the body, and that bacteria in root canal teeth and the surrounding bone release potent toxins, then the patient can decide to have a root canal or not,” he says.

Many dentists believe they can sterilize a root canal tooth and that the act of instrumenting and irrigating the canal will eliminate all the bacteria, but that’s not the case.

“I’ve done biopsies on every root canal tooth that I have extracted. Almost all of them have remnants of necrotic debris still in that canal meaning that they were not thoroughly cleaned. Microbiological cultures of the surrounding bone showed infection almost 100% of the time.” Dr. Kulacz says.

According to the ADA, any remaining bacteria will be “entombed” within that tooth, but that’s not true either. The gutta-percha, the filling material used to seal the canal, is not getting into the tiny lateral canals that branch off the main canal, so leakage is almost always possible, especially since the tooth is porous.

And even a perfectly sealed root canal cannot prevent the small molecule exotoxins produced by the bacteria inside the root canal tooth from easily migrating out of the tooth and into the body.

The bulk of the tooth structure is composed of dentinal tubules, hollow structures that run from the main canal outward. If you were to put these tubules end to end from just a single rooted tooth, they would stretch for about three miles.

But they’re big enough to harbor bacteria three across, which you can never remove or sterilize. A tooth is more like a sponge than a solid structure.

“If you had a solid tooth structure that was like steel or a metal, you were able to clear out the main canal of that tooth, there were no tributaries, and you can perfectly seal it, and eliminate the residual infection in the surrounding jaw bone a root canal would be great. But we can’t do that,” he says.

“Now, it doesn’t mean that all root canal teeth are going to cause disease. It depends upon the type of bacteria that are in there, what kind of toxins they produce, and the immune system health of the individual.

p>But with 25 to 30 million root canals done per year, multiply that by how many years a person is alive, there’s a lot of root canals out there. And a lot of them are not good.”

Bacteria from Root Canals May Worsen Other Diseases

Since root canal teeth are chronically infected, they may contribute to a number of different health problems, including heart disease. While the ADA insists bacteria from root canal teeth can never travel to distant sites in your body, Dr. Kulacz disagrees, explaining:

“Heart disease is caused by the damage to the inside lining of the blood vessel (the cholesterol is a secondary byproduct). The primary cause of heart disease is the damage of the intima lining of the blood vessel and migration of macrophages and cholesterol inside that artery.

Inflammation causes plaque to rupture into the lumen, into the space of the blood vessel, causing a blood clot and a heart attack. [A] study done in 2013… compared the bacterial DNA in blood clots and arterial plaque in heart attack patients to the DNA of the bacteria in the mouth.

The same bacteria found in the root canal teeth and in gum disease are found in the plaques in coronary arteries and in the blood clots that caused the heart attack.

These bacteria move from the mouth into other sites of the body like the arterial plaques. They’ve also found the same bacteria in the pericardial fluid or the fluid that surrounds the heart… In heart disease you don’t want infection and inflammation in an arterial plaque.

The presence of oral bacteria from root canal teeth and gum disease in the arterial plaque and blood clots of heart attack patients points to direct causation, rather than correlation between oral infection and cardiovascular disease.”

All Root Canal Teeth Will Become More Infected Over Time

Because root canal teeth no longer have a blood supply, the bacteria remaining inside all root canal teeth are effectively “hidden” from the immune system. To make matters worse, the root canal tooth becomes more infected over time due to the influx of bacteria from the gum tissue surrounding the tooth.

Other research has shown pathogenic bacteria from infected root canals destroy or kill the white blood cells designed to eliminate them, which is why the surrounding jaw bone can harbor such chronic infection. The bacteria can also evade your immune system by:

  • Bacterial mimicry; mimicking your body’s own bacteria, which your white blood cells will not attack
  • Disabling your antibodies and white blood cells
  • Forming sticky biofilms

Decisions… Decisions…

It’s important to recognize that the reason you get cavities and/or infected teeth in the first place is related to your diet—primarily eating too much sugar.

If your diet is inadequate, your immune function will be compromised, and if your immune system is weakened, the bacteria’s ability to wreak havoc is magnified. So does this mean you have to extract all of your root canal teeth? No, Dr. Kulacz says.

“We can’t become so closed-minded that we ignore mainstream dentistry or mainstream medicine just because we don’t believe one part of it. Just saying that we’re going to extract all root canal teeth and we’re going to cure all disease is not valid. That’s as bad as saying that root canal teeth can’t cause any problems. We have to find the balance… we have to evaluate objectively and then come to a reasonable conclusion and protocol on what to do with these root canal teeth.”

If you’re considering having a root canal done, evaluate the data and your personal situation, such as your health risks, before making your decision. I would also suggest considering ozone therapy priorto root canal or tooth extraction. Ozone therapy is typically administered through a syringe, right into or around to the base of the tooth. Multiple visits are usually needed to address the infection. Ozone is directly toxic to infectious material, and it also stimulates your immune system.

I was able to prevent a root canal by using ozone therapy not too long ago. However if the pulp tissue has completely died due to infection, nothing, including ozone, will bring the tooth back to life. It took about five treatments. It’s safe, non-toxic, and relatively inexpensive, so it may be worth considering before taking more drastic measures.

If you decide to have the tooth extracted rather than doing a root canal, there are several options on how to restore that missing tooth. The first and least expensive option is with a removable appliance or partial denture. You need to take it out at night, put it back in in the morning, and keep it clean. It’s the least invasive way to restore missing teeth.

The second and considerably more expensive alternative is to do a bridge. The teeth on either side of the missing tooth are prepared for caps or crowns, and the missing tooth is attached to those two abutment teeth. The bridge is permanently put in as one unit. The problem is you have to cut down a lot of the enamel on the adjacent teeth, which causes trauma to those teeth, potentially risking the need for another root canal over time.

What You Need to Know About Dental Implants

The third option is a dental implant, where a screw is inserted into your jawbone after a healing time of between three and six months to ensure a base of solid, healthy bone in the jaw. Then a tooth is built upon the top of the implant. The implant functions as your root would have and you have a permanent crown that functions like your real tooth. While that may sound ideal, there potential problems to consider.

First, if you use a titanium implant, you’re placing metal into your jawbone, which can cause a galvanic or battery response with other metals in your mouth. There are reports in the literature of allergy and tissue toxicity to the metal used in dental implants that can also negatively impact health. At the very least, if you are considering a titanium dental implant, have an allergy test to all the metals present in that implant. This is especially true if you have a known sensitivity to metals.

Dr. Kulacz prefers zirconium implants, as they do not have metallic ions found in titanium implants. However, if an implant is placed into the bone where a previous root canal was done, and the bone was insufficiently cleaned out when the tooth was extracted, then your bone may still be infected. In such a case, you’re placing an implant into a chronically infected bone, which is inadvisable.

“It’s critical when you extract the root canal tooth that you remove the periodontal ligament (the little sling that holds the tooth to the jawbone), the lamina dura or socket bone (the only purpose of that socket bone is to support the tooth), and then a small amount of bone outside that space. That’s done with a slow-speed, round dental bur with copious or lots of sterile sealing and irrigation to keep the bone healthy.

If you do that, you remove the infection, you induce good blood flow into the jawbone – without blood, there is no healing – and you have a non-infected, healthy, and healed bone to which you can then place your dental implant,” he says. “Bacterial cultures and tissue biopsy of the surrounding bone after thorough socket cleaning can uncover any residual infection that may remain. This is why I do not favor immediate placement of a dental implant into the socket of a root canal tooth, preferring to wait for the results of the cultures and biopsy as well as adequate bone healing.”

Gum disease is also a common problem associated with implants. An infection or an inflammation in the gums is very similar to having an infection or inflammation in the bone or the root canal tooth. Natural teeth have a barrier against the migration of bacteria into the surrounding bone.

They are full of fibers that insert from the gum into the root of the tooth and the bone, which prevents the bacteria from getting in to the bone area. Dental implants don’t have that. They rely on a sticky coating secreted by the gum around the cuff of the collar of the post that supports the crown.

That cuff of tissue has to be maintained with good oral hygiene to prevent inflammation that might otherwise loosen the tissue around the tooth. If you have gum disease and don’t clean the implant post thoroughly, the gum disease around implants will progress much more rapidly than around a natural tooth. If you have a dental implant, it’s imperative to follow strict oral hygiene, or you may quickly end up with gum problems.

A Root Canal Tooth Is Dead, and Necrotic Tissue Tends to Cause Problems

A root canal tooth is no longer alive. It’s dead tissue, which should never be left in your body. If you have appendicitis, the surgeon just doesn’t isolate it and leave it in there. He has to remove it. Yet when it comes to teeth, this rule is ignored.

According to Dr. Kulacz, many people who came to see him—often as a last resort—were able to resolve chronic health issues once their severely infected root canal teeth were extracted and/or the infection properly treated. Interestingly, Dr. Weston A. Price was even able to reproduce people’s diseases in rabbits simply by implanting the person’s root canal tooth beneath the rabbit’s skin.1

“The ADA tries to refute Price’s work, saying it lacks adequate controls and they used too much bacteria when they inoculated the bacteria into these rabbits. Well, that’s not true. They took the actual root canal tooth and they implanted the same root canal tooth with no more bacteria than would have been found in the person from which it came.

That same tooth was implanted under the skin of rabbits. Lo and behold, they would find the same disease occur in the rabbits. The ADA says they repeated Price’s work and found it to be invalid. Well, they never have. I’ve looked for it. I’ve emailed them. There is no repeat of Price’s work. Further, current research supports Price’s assertions that bacteria from root canal teeth DO travel to distant sites in the body.”

More Information

To learn more about root canals, and/or to help educate your dentist, I strongly recommend picking up a copy of Dr. Kulacz’ book, The Toxic Tooth: How a Root Canal Could Be Making You SickIf your dentist is honest and sincere, he or she will likely come to the same rational conclusion as Dr. Kulacz. Granted, in many cases, you’re likely to meet with resistance. This seems to be the norm before changes in thinking finally shift to the majority. In some cases the resistance can be severe.

Dr. Kulacz ended up losing his practice after the New York State dental board drummed up a series of charges against him, including “gross misconduct” for extracting root canal treated teeth. The dental board initially wanted to pull his dental license, but backed off when the prosecuting attorney admitted no dentist had actually reviewed the reams of data he’d sent in defense of his treatment—a case of misconduct on behalf of the dental board.

“I called the chancellor of the board of regents in New York State and said, ‘Your dental board is corrupt. The prosecutor admitted to me that my case was not about justice. It was not about the truth. The dental board had an agenda. They already dismissed this patient’s file as a cause of action.’

Now, I’m not a conspiracy guy. I never thought that this kind of thing could happen. In fact, if somebody would have told me in the years prior that this could happen, I would’ve thought they were crazy. But it did happen to me,” Dr. Kulacz says. “The next day, the attorney from New York State called and said, ‘The dental board is going to drop all charges if you will accept a records violation.’ They had to have something, otherwise I could go after them for false prosecution.”

Considering it would have taken several years and a quarter of a million dollars to continue fighting, he accepted the records violation—not realizing this would effectively put him out of business… He kept his dental license, but he never realized accepting the violation would increase his malpractice premium ten-fold—from $8,000 a year to $80,000. After being shut down for a year because of the board’s action, he made the painful decision not to reopen. Dr. Kulacz’ story is yet another example of what can happen to a professional who bucks the trend.

It’s not very different from the case of Ignaz Semmelweis, an ob-gyn and surgeon who, about 150 years ago, was vilified for his theory that microbes cause infection. Semmelweis was labeled “insane” by his colleagues for having the audacity to suggest they should wash their hands between deliveries, and they fired him.

He tried to continue his research but was ostracized by the medical community. His mental health eventually did deteriorate, leading to his death in an insane asylum.

Fortunately for us, Dr. Kulacz wrote a book instead of mulling on the pain and frustration of losing a two decades long career. It’s a great resource, with the details necessary to convince most rational individuals that root canals are not in the best interest of your health. And, if you have a root canal tooth, to be cautious and consider having it extracted if indicated. You can also learn more on his website, coletrex.com, or contact him via email at: rkulacz505@gmail.com.

Can Probiotics Help With Gum Disease?


More than 700 kinds of bacteria can live in your mouth — some helpful, and some harmful. Don’t run for your toothbrush or mouthwash just yet. As long as they’re in balance, the “good” kind keep the “bad” ones from hurting you.

But if that balance gets out of whack, the harmful ones can take hold and lead to gum disease.

You might have heard how good bacteria in certain foods and supplements (called probiotics) may help with this kind of imbalance in your gut. Well, scientists are finding that they may help fight gum disease in much the same way.

That might give you and your dentist another tool to use to treat or prevent gum issues along with the standard ones.

How Does the Imbalance Happen?

Researchers are still trying to sort out what lets the harmful bacteria go to work in your mouth. The triggers can include:

  • Not taking care of your teeth and gums. This lets the bad bacteria multiply and shifts the balance.
  • A weak immune system. This can affect the way the bacteria in your mouth relate to one another and give the harmful kind an advantage.
  • Your body’s genetic blueprint. Some people may not have enough of the helpful bacteria, or they may be more likely to have the bad kind.
  • Dry mouth. Your saliva has substances that help fight harmful bacteria. But some medicines, like painkillers and decongestants, can affect how much you have.

How Does That Lead to Gum Disease?

An imbalance of bacteria can affect your body’s defenses and keep your white blood cells from killing harmful bacteria. Those bacteria can inflame your gums. That inflammation, in turn, gives off chemicals that feed bad bacteria, which multiply. More bacteria inflame your gums and start to eat away at the bone that anchors your teeth.

If this goes on long enough, your gums and the bone that supports your teeth can be ruined. You might end up losing teeth.

It also can set you up for tooth decay and bad breath. Researchers think it also may help cause oral cancer.

And if you have too many harmful bacteria in your mouth, they can move to other parts of your body and may be linked to:

Probiotics and Gum Disease

A group of helpful bacteria called lactobacilli can fight several kinds of bad bacteria and may help restore a healthy balance in your mouth.

Researchers put some of this bacteria into chewing gum and asked people with the gum disease gingivitis to use it every day. (With gingivitis, your gums are red and swollen and bleed easily.) After 2 weeks, the teeth of the people in the study had less plaque — the clear, sticky film that can cause cavities or gum disease.

Another study found that lozenges with the same kind of bacteria also helped with inflammation and plaque.

If you have gum disease or are worried about it, talk with your dentist about whether a probiotic like this might be good for you. But remember that the most important things you can do to guard against gum disease are to brush and floss your teeth.

To Floss or Not to Floss?


Your dentist has probably been telling you to floss for years. If you’ve resisted that advice, you’ve got a lot of company: 36% of Americans would rather do something unpleasant, like clean the toilet, than wedge waxed string between their teeth.

That’s why many cheered at a news report that flossing might not be necessary. The Associated Press reviewed 25 studies and concluded that flossing didn’t have proven health benefits.

Adding to the anti-flossing evidence, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Agriculture (USDA) have removed it from their guidelines for good oral health.

Should You Toss Your Floss?

Not so fast. Many dental experts aren’t on board.

“While the research on [the connection between] flossing and cavities is hazy, the research on flossing’s role in preventing gum disease is much clearer,” says Leena Palomo DDS, an associate professor of periodontics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. “That’s why dentists, hygienists, and periodontists continue to recommend flossing.”

One review of 12 studies found that people who brushed and flossed regularly were less likely to have bleeding gums. They had lower levels of gum inflammation (called gingivitis, the earliest stage of gum disease), too.

“Food that’s left between teeth causes gum inflammation andtooth decay. Flossing is the only way to remove it. A toothbrush just can’t get between teeth,” says dentistry professor Sivan Finkel, DMD, of New York University College of Dentistry.

The Flossing-Health Connection

About half of all Americans have gum disease, also known as periodontal disease. That’s a chronic inflammatory disease that shows up when bacteria in plaque (a sticky film that forms on your teeth) below the gum line cause swelling and irritation. Left untreated, it can lead to receding gums and tooth loss.

Gum disease is also linked to heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, premature birth, and many other health conditions. “Your mouth is a mirror for the rest of your body,” Palomo says.

The connection between gum disease and health isn’t entirely clear. Some scientists think more bacteria left in your mouth end up in your bloodstream, where they may contribute to inflammation in other areas, like your heart. What experts do know is that people who don’t have gum disease are less likely to have health problems like heart disease.

“Flossing removes debris that contains bacteria that cause gum disease,” Palomo says.

Nothing to Lose

The American Academy of Periodontology and the American Dental Association recommend flossing. “It makes sense to get dental advice from these dental organizations,” Palomo says.

In fact, many dentists and periodontists say the reason they recommend flossing isn’t because of research. Instead, it’s because of what they see in their patients.

“In my practice, it’s clear that people who floss daily have healthier gums and keep their teeth longer,” Finkel says. “In fact, patients who have early-stage cavities often reverse that decay by flossing daily as well as brushing and maintaining good oral hygiene.”

When his patients question whether it’s worth it, Finkel says he tells them this: “It takes less than a minute, and there’s literally no downside to doing it. But if you skip it, sooner or later you — and your dentist — will notice a difference.”

Dentists Dying From Mercury Poisoning?


Story at-a-glance

  • A cluster of eight dentists and one dental technician from Virginia were diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a chronic and progressive lung disease with no known cure
  • One of the dentists contacted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in April 2016, concerned that a number of dentists were all being treated for the same relatively rare disease
  • The dental workers were 23 times more likely to develop IPF compared to the general population
  • Mercury used for amalgam fillings is a known lung-damaging agent, and dentists are known to be exposed to mercury vapors in dental office air as well as have higher mercury levels than the general population

By Dr. Mercola

Exposure to hazardous substances while on the job is a reality for many occupations, from farmers and construction workers to firefighters — and dentists. In the latter case, the use of toxic substances like mercury for amalgam fillings is not only dangerous for patients but also for those working with the material in the office.

In fact, a cluster of eight dentists and one dental technician from Virginia were diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a chronic and progressive lung disease with no known cure, and sought treatment at the same specialty clinic in the state from 2000 to 2015.

One of the dentists contacted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in April 2016, concerned that a number of dentists were all being treated for the same relatively rare disease. While IPF has been associated with certain occupations in the past, especially exposure to certain dusty environments like those that may occur during agricultural work, textile manufacturing or exposure to wood dust,1 dentistry was an entirely new connection.

Dentists 23 Times More Likely to Develop IPF Than General Population

In June 2017, the CDC reviewed medical records from 894 patients diagnosed with IPF and treated at the above-mentioned specialty clinic from September 1996 to June 2017, looking for those with an occupation of dentist, dental hygienist or dental technician. Nine of the patients, or 1 percent, were dental personnel. Considering the small number of dentists in the U.S. relative to the overall population (0.038 percent in 2016), the fact that they represented nearly 1 percent of patients being treated for IPF at one clinic was noteworthy.

In fact, the CDC analysis revealed that the dental workers were 23 times more likely to develop IPF compared to the general population. Seven of the patients died during the study period, and only one of the remaining patients (the dentist who originally contacted the CDC) could be interviewed, which revealed that he had not worn protective equipment during much of his career and later transitioned only to a surgical mask. The CDC reported:2

“The interviewed patient, who had never smoked, reported not wearing a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified respirator during dental activities throughout his 40-year dental practice; he wore a surgical mask for the last 20 years of his dental practice. He reported performing polishing of dental appliances, preparing amalgams and impressions, and developing X-rays using film developing solutions.”

The CDC also queried the National Occupational Respiratory Mortality System for 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2007, which revealed 35 deaths from IPF or related pulmonary diseases in people working in the “office of dentists” and 19 categorized as having the occupation “dentist.” “These findings suggest that a higher rate of IPF might occur among dental personnel than among the general population,” according to the CDC, which also acknowledged:3

“This investigation revealed the first described cluster of dental personnel with diagnosed IPF. The eight dentists identified in this cluster exceeded the number of expected cases, consistent with National Occupational Respiratory Mortality System data regarding IPF mortality and the proportion of U.S. residents who are dentists.

Dentists and other dental personnel experience unique occupational exposures, including exposure to infectious organisms, dusts, gases and fumes. It is possible that occupational exposures contributed to this cluster. After this analysis, another IPF case was diagnosed in a dentist treated at this specialty clinic.”

What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

IPF is a disease that causes scar tissues to build up deep in your lungs. This starts in the lungs’ air sac walls, through which air passes into your blood. As the walls thicken with scar tissue, it causes your lungs to stop functioning properly, which means they can no longer get enough oxygen into your bloodstream, brain and body. People with IPF commonly experience shortness of breath, which may first only occur during exercise but eventually progresses to the point where you may feel short of breath even when you’re at rest.

IPF may also cause a dry, hacking cough or uncontrollable coughing, as well as weight loss, fatigue, aching muscles, rapid breathing and rounding of the tips of your fingers or toes, known as clubbing. Eventually, as the disease progresses it leads to respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure; most people survive only three to five years after being diagnosed.

Exposure to environmental pollutants, including inorganic dust (silica and hard metal dusts) and organic dust (bacteria and animal proteins), is known to cause pulmonary fibrosis, as are certain medications, including nitrofurantoin (an antibiotic), amiodarone (a heart medicine) and the chemotherapy drugs methotrexate and bleomycin.4 It’s estimated that 200,000 Americans have IPF.5

Is Exposure to Mercury and Other Toxins to Blame?

While the CDC report maintains an air of surprise about the findings, in reality, when you drill mercury in people’s mouths day after day, while you’re sitting above them inhaling everything, it’s probably going to affect your lungs, as well as your overall health. The fact that the American Dental Association (ADA) has historically defended mercury’s use for fillings, and continues to do so to this day, has surpassed the point of ignorance and reached that of malice.

Mercury is a known lung-damaging agent and, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is “toxic … through inhalation of mercury vapors.”

Acute inhalation of mercury is known to cause inflammation of the lungs and shortness of breath, as well as respiratory failure and death in extreme cases. Over the long term, mercury-induced lung damage may include “increased fibrous tissue in the lung (pulmonary fibrosis), restrictive lung disease and chronic respiratory insufficiency.”6 The World Health Organization (WHO) further states:7

“Mercury is highly toxic and harmful to health. Approximately 80 percent of inhaled mercury vapor is absorbed in the blood through the lungs, causing damages to lungs, kidneys and the nervous, digestive, respiratory and immune systems.

Health effects from excessive mercury exposure include tremors, impaired vision and hearing, paralysis, insomnia, emotional instability, developmental deficits during fetal development, and attention deficit and developmental delays during childhood.”

Meanwhile, mercury is but one lung toxin that dental personnel are exposed to on a near-daily basis. Others include silica, polyvinyl siloxane, alginate and “other compounds with known or potential respiratory toxicity,” the CDC stated.8 But because mercury is the most vaporous of the heavy metals, dental amalgam pollutes dental workplaces full of toxic air — which exposes dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants and front office staff to eight to 10 hours of dangerous breathing every workday.

A clinic where the dentists regularly place amalgam is a hazardous workplace — but whose hazards are generally left unexplained to the dental staffs, even the pregnant women, which can and does have serious and horrible consequences to the reproductive systems of young women as well as others working in the office. Further, few dental workers employed by pro-mercury dentists are given protective garb or air masks to minimize their exposure to mercury and other toxins.

Air Quality in Dentists’ Offices Is Notoriously Bad

At industrial sites, employees must follow strict protocols to avoid exposure to even tiny amounts of mercury but at dental offices mercury levels may soar — and patients and employees are oblivious to the risks. Alex Hummell, CEO of Mercury Instruments USA Inc., a company that makes equipment to detect airborne levels of mercury, said he’s seen air contamination in dental offices that’s so high, it would be shut down if it were any other office. McClatchy DC reported:9

“‘They would be closing their doors and getting respirators on.’ Instead, [Hummell] said, ‘there are kids running around everywhere. It’s nuts. It’s the exact same toxin, and it’s being treated totally differently. Why is it being allowed to be so unregulated?'”

Despite the known risks, few dental offices monitor their air for mercury levels the way many industrial sites do. It’s so bad that Hummell, a father of five, says he won’t bring his children into just any dentist office, lest they be exposed to mercury even for a second.

In an experiment to determine mercury exposures at a dentist’s office, Hummell found mercury levels up to 30 times the OSHA limit could be released during a procedure to remove mercury fillings. He’s also found that mercury levels rise when a tooth with an old mercury filling is gently brushed. As you might expect, the ADA was not too thrilled to hear about Hummell’s findings. According to McClatchy DC:10

“He [Hummell] said he also showed dentists an American Dental Association pamphlet urging them to periodically monitor their offices for mercury, a circular that mostly drew chuckles and ridicule from the dentists.

‘I got a call the day after the convention from the American Dental Association’s lawyer threatening to take me down if I didn’t stop using their publication,’ Hummell said. ‘I said, ‘I thought the dental association wanted them to know. Right after that, you couldn’t find that publication anywhere … It disappeared from the internet.'”

According to Charlie Brown of Consumers for Dental Choice, “Historically, the ADA has warned dentists about the dangers of mercury in dental offices, but only when the ADA stood to profit.” For example, Brown cites an ADA brochure titled You Owe It to Yourself! Protect Yourself and Your Staff Against the Hazards of Your Profession with the ADA’s Mercury Testing Service.” In the brochure, the ADA acknowledges:

“Office spaces may be contaminated with mercury from leaky amalgam capsules and from the lingering effects of accidental spillage. High speed handpieces and ultrasonic compactors that vaporize mercury can lead to unsuspected inhalation.”

For $75 per person per year, the ADA offered a “complete and confidential” mercury-testing service. There is no evidence that the ADA has continued this mercury testing program. “It appears that the ADA found it more profitable to deny the problem of high mercury levels in dental offices,” explained Brown. Even dental students are at risk, with studies showing dental institutions and hospitals in the Philippines and Pakistan to have hazardous levels of mercury pollutants in the air.

Why Choosing a Mercury-Free Dentist Is so Important

As the health risks of mercury are readily apparent, it’s in everyone’s best interest — patients and providers alike — to opt for mercury-free dental care. According to Consumers for Dental Choice, dental offices that opt to use mercury put dental professionals at risk, as they may come into contact with the poison both directly and indirectly; mercury can even contaminate carpeting and pipes. Exposure to mercury in the workplace has led to:11

  • Higher levels of mercury in dental workers compared to the general population
  • Increased health problems, including neurological, neuropsychological, respiratory, cardiac and kidney disorders, in dental professionals compared to the general population
  • More reproductive problems for female dental professionals compared to the general population

While other countries, including Sweden and Norway, have phased out the use of mercury amalgam fillings completely, in the U.S. only 32 percent to 52 percent of dentists are mercury-free. This means it’s up to you to find a mercury-free dentist when choosing a dental provider for yourself and your family.

Now that about half of American dentists are mercury-free, Consumers for Dental Choice has shifted its focus from supply to demand, and consumer demand for mercury-free dentistry is primarily held back by insurance companies and other third-party payers who mandate continued amalgam use. It’s time to drive home the message that consumers will no longer tolerate the use of mercury amalgams and will not settle for insurance plans and programs that mandate amalgam use. To participate:

1. Check the details of your dental insurance policy. If it fully pays for amalgam while limiting or denying coverage for mercury-free fillings, register your objections with this easy-to-fill-out online form, which you can then email to your insurance company. Please visit the Consumer for Dental Choice Demand Your Choice page to find additional details and tools to help you take a stand against your insurance company’s pro-mercury policies.

2. Next, find another insurance company or plan that pays for mercury-free fillings in all teeth, without exceptions or LEAT clauses.

3. If your current dentist is still using mercury in his or her practice — even if they also offer mercury-free options — seek out a dentist that offers only mercury-free fillings for all patients. And, be sure to inform your dentist about the reason you’re transferring.

The reason for this is because dentists who still use amalgam end up using it on people who rarely have any other choice, either because they cannot afford to pay the difference, or their state or government program dictates they can only receive mercury.

This unfair practice needs to end, and the quicker we can get all dentists to go 100 percent mercury-free, the sooner these programs will be forced to change. So, selecting a 100 percent mercury-free dentist is an altruistic choice on your part, which will help those whose voices are so often ignored. It will also lead to a safer office environment for the patients and staff.

4. If you have mercury fillings, be sure to consult with a biological dentist who is trained in the safe removal of amalgam.

5. Last but not least, spread the word, and urge your family and friends to challenge their insurance companies’ toxic policies and make the switch to a mercury-free dentist as well.

 

+ Sources and References

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How Safe Are Root Canals?


How Safe Are Root Canals?

Tens of millions of root canals are performed each year, yet how safe are they? Consider the morbid fact that it is the only procedure routinely performed where a dead part of your body — the diseased tooth — is kept attached to your body. 

Almost 60 million root canals are performed a year (1), on individuals who are mistakenly informed that it is a safe and harmless procedure. While your teeth may look and feel fine after the procedure, the reality is that it is impossible for all of the bacteria to be removed from the tooth. After a root canal, the healthy bacteria changes to highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that will continue to thrive inside and around the tooth, jawbone and periodontal ligament causing numerous potentially long term health problems. (1)

Dr. Weston Price

Dr. Weston Price was a brilliant dentist and researcher who studied the relationship between nutrition, dental and physical health. He was the head of research for the dental association for 14 years.  In their studies, Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic discovered that bacterial growth in root canals could be transferred to animals to recreate the same diseases of the human donor. Their tests proved successful in 80 to 100% of the animals. In particular, heart disease could be transferred 100% of the time (1, 2). It’s shocking to know that as far back as 1908 Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic found that bacteria and the toxins from root canals could enter the bloodstream and thus travel to any point in the body and create disease to that particular tissue or organ. (1, 2). Price went on to discover that numerous degenerative diseases have their origin in root canal procedures, the most frequent are circulatory and heart disease.

Others would follow in Dr. Price’s footsteps to bring this knowledge to the public. Dr. George Meinig would discover his work 70 years later and bring it to the forefront through his book, Root Canal Cover Up.  The Toxic Element Research Foundation (TERF) would later use state of the art DNA technology to identify multiple bacteria found within root canal teeth, the jawbone next to root canals as well as in areas of extracted teeth where proper protocols were not performed to remove the periodontal ligament and necrotic bone.

Basic tooth anatomy

A tooth has multiple layers, the first is the  enamel, the second layer is the dentin and the inner core is the pulp. Tiny fibers come out of the tooth and intertwine with fibers coming out of the bone, and they unite to form the periodontal ligament. This ligament is also an incubator for billions of bacteria to multiply. (1) The dentin layer is not solid, but is actually comprised of tiny dentinal tubules, that if stretched would be approximately three miles long, per tooth. This is another excellent place for bacteria to hide and develop. In fact when Weston Price did his research, this is exactly where he found anaerobic bacteria in the thousands of teeth he tested. (2) Since it is impossible to sterilize these accessory canals, it becomes a haven for bacteria to grow and develop. As bacteria multiply and create infection, it will oftentimes extend down into the jawbone where it creates cavitations—areas of necrotic tissue in the jawbone itself.

Common bacteria found in root canals

The American Dental Association (ADA) still insists to this day that Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic Research was incorrect, yet they have no research to back this claim. Dentists are misled to believe that root canals are a safe and harmless procedure. While they may claim that bacteria found in teeth with root canals can’t cause disease, the simple fact remains, the bacteria found in root canaled teeth are not the same normal bacteria found in your mouth. Without oxygen and nutrients the friendly bacteria become highly toxic, capable of causing long term infection, jawbone loss and numerous diseases.

In Hal Huggins article on Root Canal Dangers, he shares the following information on the five major bacteria species (out of the fifty –three that are commonly found in root canal teeth). (2)

Capnocytophaga ochracea: Found in brain abscesses associated with dental source of infection. Causes human disease in the central nervous system. Also related to septicemia and meningitis.

Fusobacterium nucleatum: Produces toxins that inhibit fibroblast cell division and wound healing processes. Causes infection in the heart, joints, liver and spleen.

Gemella morbillorum: Linked to acute invasive endocarditis, septic arthritis and meningitis.

Leptotrichia buccalis: Reduces the number of neutrophils (a critically important white blood cell), thus lowering immune competence.

Porphyromonas gingivalis: Destroys  red blood cells by drilling holes (porins) in them, causing the cell to bleed to  death. Low red blood cell counts that do not recover after dental revision are frequently responding to the porin activity of this microbe.  P gingivalis also  alters the integrity of the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which leads to inflammation and bleeding in the inner lining of blood vessels. According to Dr. Huggins this is the key step in formation of atherogenesis that leads to heart attacks. P. gingivalis can change friendly bacteria into pathogens. (2)

Chronic disease linked to root canals

According to Dr. George Meinig, (one of the founders of the American Association of Endodontists) and author of Root Canal Cover Up, a high percentage of chronic illness can originate from root canals, the most frequent being circulatory and heart disease. The next common diseases include those affecting the joints, such as arthritis and rheumatism; this is followed by diseases that affect the brain and nervous system such as ALS and MS.

Additional risks

Root canal treatment increases the risk of infective endocarditis. (4)

Root canals are associated with high rates of infection (up to 54%) with anaerobic bacteria. In a 1998 study for oral focal infection, 26 patients had blood drawn and tested during and ten minutes after their procedure.  All root canals contained anaerobic bacteraemia. (5)

Conclusion

It is important to do your own research before any surgical procedure and treatment plan. A root canal is a surgical procedure. The decision on whether to have a root canal or remove the tooth is best made between you, your doctor and your biological dentist. Establishing an appropriate pre and post procedure protocol can expedite your recovery process.


Resources

Wi-Fi Devices Increase Mercury Release From Dental Amalgams


Recent research indicates that our increasingly Wi-Fi saturated environment could be greatly amplifying the dangers of mercury exposure from dental amalgams.

Wi-Fi Devices Increase Mercury Release From Dental Amalgams

A new study published in the Journal of Neuroimmunology, entitled, “Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations”, reveals that our now ubiquitous exposure to Wi-Fi radiation may be amplifying the toxicity of dental amalgams and other forms of mercury exposure in the human body.

In what appears to be the first study of its kind, Brazilian researchers looked specifically at the potential for Wi-Fi signals to increase the release of mercury from dental amalgams, which are composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury.

 The highly controlled method researchers used was to recreate amalgam-filled teeth using standard protocols and then storing them in saline solution at  37° C for 14 days. The 14 day period was chosen because previous research has revealed mercury is released from amalgam restorations at gradually decreasing amounts to a constant level 14 days after the filling. 1Afterwards, and before exposing the teeth to Wi-Fi signals, samples were poured into plastic tubes filled with artificial saliva at a 1.5 cm thickness to mimic soft tissue.

Next, the researchers divided the teeth randomly into 2 groups of 10. The specimens in the experimental group were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 meters away from the router. The control group were not exposed to Wi-Fi.

The results statistically significant, with the mean concentration of mercury in the Wi-Fi group about twice of the control group. The details were as follows:

“The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009).”

The authors conluded:

“Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.”

In the discussion section of their paper, they point to previous research that has also found exposure to both MRI, and microwave radiation from cell phones, also produce increased release of mercury from dental amalgam.

We’ve discussed the dangers of laptops and mobile phone radiation in previous articles, available below:

For evidence-based research on the health impacts of Wi-Fi Radation, visit the GreenMedInfo.com Research Dashboard.

Reference:

  • [1] Müller?Miny H, Erber D, Möller H, Müller?Miny B, Bongartz G. Is there a hazard to health by mercury exposure from amalgam due to MRI? J Magn Reson Imaging. 1996;6(1):258–60. doi: 10.1002/jmri.1880060146. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]

Gum disease linked to increased stroke risk: What’s new?


A new study has shown an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk. What’s interesting is routine dental care can attenuate the stroke risk.

“The more severe the periodontal disease, the higher the risk of future stroke is,” said primary investigator Dr Souvik Sen from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine in Columbia, South Carolina, US. However, individuals who regularly attend the dentist had half the stroke risk of those who do not receive regular dental care.”

Periodontal disease characterized by increased inflammation, for example, gingivitis and severe periodontitis had the strongest association with stroke risk. “The risk is about two to three times higher in individuals with severe [periodontal] disease,” said Sen. “The risk [brought about by gum disease] is similar to that of high blood pressure.”

The study involved 10,362 middle-aged individuals with no history of previous stroke participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.  The pattern of their dental visits was classified as regular (more than once a year) or episodic (only when needed or never). Within 15 years of follow-up, 584 individuals had an incident of ischaemic stroke. [Stroke 2018;doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.018990]

Selected individuals from the ARIC study (n=6,736) were included in the ancillary dental ARIC study and were assessed and classified into seven periodontal profile classes (PPCs), from A to G (healthy to severe periodontal disease). Of these, 299 went on to have an incident ischaemic stroke in the follow-up period.

Risk lower with regular dental care

The incidence of ischaemic stroke per 1,000 person-years was 1.29 for PPC-A (the reference healthy group without periodontal disease), 2.82 for PPC-B (mild periodontal disease), 4.80 for PPC-C (high gingival index score), 3.81 for PPC-D (tooth loss), 3.50 for PPC-E (posterior disease), 4.78 for PPC-F (severe tooth loss), and 5.03 for PPC-G (severe periodontal disease).

Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic stroke (hazard ratio, 2.6, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.2–5.6) and thrombotic stroke (HR, 2.2, 95 percent CI, 1.3–3.8), but not lacunar strokes.

Regular dental users had a lower risk of stroke (crude hazard ratio [HR], 0.52] vs episodic users. The risk remained lower for regular dental users after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, race/centre, low-density lipoprotein level, and other factors (adjusted HR, 0.77).

Oral and heart health: The connection

Association cannot prove causation. However, more studies have shown that the bacteria found in gum disease, for example, Streptococcus sanguinis, can attach to the bloodstream and damage the heart valves, resulting in endocarditis.

“Our findings support the link between gum disease and stroke. The mechanism is to do with atherosclerosis and/or atrial fibrillation,” said Sen.  “Of note, good dental hygiene can mitigate the risk. The message is that good regular dental care, including a thorough home cleaning routine with brushing and flossing and regular dentist visits, can do more for heart health.”

Is Hydrogen Peroxide Mouthwash Harmful for Teeth?


Is Hydrogen Peroxide Mouthwash Harmful for Teeth?

Regarded as a legendary healing compound, scientific evidence shows that hydrogen peroxide mouthwash and bleaching is actually harmful for teeth and may cause tissue irritation and teeth sensitivity and compromise long-term dental health. 

Hydrogen peroxide is praised for its antiseptic and healing properties. In fact, there is a new urban myth proclaiming that hydrogen peroxide is universally beneficial for all the body organs and tissues. Regarding dental health, this couldn’t be further from the truth as evidence shows that hydrogen peroxide is actually toxic for the cells in the inner part of the teeth, also known as the dental pulp. Without a doubt, hydrogen peroxide does a really good job at bleaching and disinfecting teeth; hydrogen peroxide- based bleaching gels are essential for dentists and there is solid evidence demonstrating the efficacy of these protocols. On the other hand, there is a lot of uncontrolled information and advice, recommending hydrogen peroxide as an ideal everyday mouthwash. Taking into account that over-the-counter hydrogen peroxide concentrations can be as high as the formulas used by dentists in bleaching sessions (20-30%) and the growing popularity of hydrogen peroxide as an alternative therapy, the danger of potential long-term teeth damage by using high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide as a casual mouthwash are unknown, underestimated and largely under-discussed.

Hydrogen peroxide releases superoxide anions (powerful free radicals), which are responsible for its significant bleaching and antiseptic properties. However, its beneficial properties stop right here because research shows that it can penetrate the tooth enamel and dentin and reach the very inner tooth chamber called dental pulp. Hydrogen peroxide has low molecular weight and the ability to destroy proteins, which facilitate diffusion through enamel and dentin. The dental pulp is where the blood vessels and nerves of each tooth reside, which makes this area particularly sensitive. A unique class of cells, called odontoblasts also reside in the periphery of the dental pulp area, which support the teeth by depositing new dentin layers throughout life and are also believed to play a protective/reparative role in response to dental carries or other environmental factors that harm teeth. The problem with hydrogen peroxide is that it has a cytotoxic effect on the dental pulp cells, which means that it literally kills them. A study published in 2013 in the Journal of Endodontics shows that even low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide trigger molecular mechanisms in pulp cells, which activate programmed cell death.

According to another study published in the same journal in 2013, even the bleaching protocols used by dentists seem to be harmful for the dental pulp, since the damage in that area is directly correlated to the number of bleaching sessions. Odontoblasts, are directly damaged or show a significant decrease in their metabolic activity as a result of the bleaching sessions using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel. It is believed that this effect may result in tissue irritation and tooth sensitivity. A study published in the journal Scientific World Journal in 2013 shows that the higher the concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the faster it reaches the inner tooth tissues. The authors tested 35% and 20% concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and report that the 35% hydrogen peroxide diffused faster into the pulp chamber than the 20% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel.

It is speculated that lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide may have significantly less toxic effects on dental pulp cells, because there is more time to dilute and degrade the peroxide that reaches the pulp. However, the long-term or even short-term effects of daily use of hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash have never been evaluated. If a few bleaching sessions can cause detectable damage in the dental pulp, then, based on the existing evidence, it is reasonable to assume that using hydrogen peroxide mouthwash on a daily basis may not be the safest option at all.


References

Wu TT, et al. 2013. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis in human dental pulp cells via caspase-9 dependent pathway. J Endod. 39(9):1151-5.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23953289

Torres CR et al. 2013. Influence of concentration and activation on hydrogen peroxide diffusion through dental tissues in vitro. ScientificWorldJournal. 2013:193241.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24163616

Cintra LT et al. 2013. The number of bleaching sessions influences pulp tissue damage in rat teeth. J Endod. 39(12):1576-80.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24238450

Dias Ribeiro AP, et al. 2009. Cytotoxic effect of a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel on odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 108(3):458-64.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19716511

Arana-Chavez VE, Massa LF. 2004. Odontoblasts: the cells forming and maintaining dentine. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 36(8):1367-73.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15147714

97% of Terminal Cancer Patients Previously Had This Dental Procedure.


dental

Do you have a chronic degenerative disease? If so, have you been told, “It’s all in your head?” Well, that might not be that far from the truth…

The root cause of your illness may be in your mouth.

There is a common dental procedure that nearly every dentist will tell you is completely safe, despite the fact that scientists have been warning of its dangers for more than 100 years.

Every day in the United States alone, 41,000 of these dental procedures are performed on patients who believe they are safely and permanently fixing their problem.

What is this dental procedure?

 

The root canal.

More than 25 million root canals are performed every year in this country.

 

Root-canaled teeth are essentially “dead” teeth that can become silent incubators for highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that can, under certain conditions, make their way into your bloodstream to cause a number of serious medical conditions—many not appearing until decades later.

 

Most of these toxic teeth feel and look fine for many years, which make their role in systemic disease even harder to trace back.

 

Sadly, the vast majority of dentists are oblivious to the serious potential health risks they are exposing their patients to, risks that persist for the rest of their patients’ lives. The American Dental Association claims root canals have been proven safe, but they have NO published data or actual research to substantiate this claim.

 

Fortunately, I had some early mentors like Dr. Tom Stone and Dr. Douglas Cook, who educated me on this issue nearly 20 years ago. Were it not for a brilliant pioneering dentist who, more than a century ago, made the connection between root-canaled teeth and disease, this underlying cause of disease may have remained hidden to this day. The dentist’s name was Weston Price—regarded by many as the greatest dentist of all time.

 

Weston A. Price: World’s Greatest Dentist

Most dentists would be doing an enormous service to public health if they familiarized themselves with the work of Dr. Weston Pricei. Unfortunately, his work continues to be discounted and suppressed by medical and dental professionals alike.

 

Dr. Price was a dentist and researcher who traveled the world to study the teeth, bones, and diets of native populations living without the “benefit” of modern food. Around the year 1900, Price had been treating persistent root canal infections and became suspicious that root-canaled teeth always remained infected, in spite of treatments. Then one day, he recommended to a woman, wheelchair bound for six years, to have her root canal tooth extracted, even though it appeared to be fine.

 

She agreed, so he extracted her tooth and then implanted it under the skin of a rabbit. The rabbit amazingly developed the same crippling arthritis as the woman and died from the infection 10 days later. But the woman, now free of the toxic tooth, immediately recovered from her arthritis and could now walk without even the assistance of a cane.

 

Price discovered that it’s mechanically impossible to sterilize a root-canaled (e.g. root-filled) tooth.

He then went on to show that many chronic degenerative diseases originate from root-filled teeth—the most frequent being heart and circulatory diseases. He actually found 16 different causative bacterial agents for these conditions. But there were also strong correlations between root-filled teeth and diseases of the joints, brain and nervous system. Dr. Price went on to write two groundbreaking books in 1922 detailing his research into the link between dental pathology and chronic illness. Unfortunately, his work was deliberately buried for 70 years, until finally one endodontist named George Meinig recognized the importance of Price’s work and sought to expose the truth.

 

Dr. Meinig Advances the Work of Dr. Price

Dr. Meinig, a native of Chicago, was a captain in the U.S. Army during World War II before moving to Hollywood to become a dentist for the stars. He eventually became one of the founding members of the American Association of Endodontists (root canal specialists).

 

In the 1990s, he spent 18 months immersed in Dr. Price’s research. In June of 1993, Dr. Meinig published the book Root Canal Cover-Up, which continues to be the most comprehensive reference on this topic today. You can order your copy directly from the Price-Pottenger Foundationii.

What Dentists Don’t Know About the Anatomy of Your Teeth

Your teeth are made of the hardest substances in your body.

 

In the middle of each tooth is the pulp chamber, a soft living inner structure that houses blood vessels and nerves. Surrounding the pulp chamber is the dentin, which is made of living cells that secrete a hard mineral substance. The outermost and hardest layer of your tooth is the white enamel, which encases the dentin.

The roots of each tooth descend into your jawbone and are held in place by the periodontal ligament. In dental school, dentists are taught that each tooth has one to four major canals. However, there are accessory canals that are never mentioned. Literally miles of them!

Just as your body has large blood vessels that branch down into very small capillaries, each of your teeth has a maze of very tiny tubules that, if stretched out, would extend for three miles. Weston Price identified as many as 75 separate accessory canals in a single central incisor (front tooth). For a more detailed explanation, refer to an article by Hal Huggins, DDS, MS, on the Weston A. Price Foundation website.iii (These images are borrowed from the Huggins article.)

 

Microscopic organisms regularly move in and around these tubules, like gophers in underground tunnels.

 

When a dentist performs a root canal, he or she hollows out the tooth, then fills the hollow chamber with a substance (called guttapercha), which cuts off the tooth from its blood supply, so fluid can no longer circulate through the tooth. But the maze of tiny tubules remains. And bacteria, cut off from their food supply, hide out in these tunnels where they are remarkably safe from antibiotics and your own body’s immune defenses.

 

The Root Cause of Much Disease

Under the stresses of oxygen and nutrient deprivation, these formerly friendly organisms morph into stronger, more virulent anaerobes that produce a variety of potent toxins. What were once ordinary, friendly oral bacteria mutate into highly toxic pathogens lurking in the tubules of the dead tooth, just awaiting an opportunity to spread.

 

No amount of sterilization has been found effective in reaching these tubules—and just about every single root-canaled tooth has been found colonized by these bacteria, especially around the apex and in the periodontal ligament. Oftentimes, the infection extends down into the jawbone where it creates cavitations—areas of necrotic tissue in the jawbone itself.

 

Cavitations are areas of unhealed bone, often accompanied by pockets of infected tissue and gangrene. Sometimes they form after a tooth extraction (such as a wisdom tooth extraction), but they can also follow a root canal. According to Weston Price Foundation, in the records of 5,000 surgical cavitation cleanings, only two were found healed.

And all of this occurs with few, if any, accompanying symptoms. So you may have an abscessed dead tooth and not know it. This focal infection in the immediate area of the root-canaled tooth is bad enough, but the damage doesn’t stop there.

 

Root Canals Can Lead to Heart, Kidney, Bone, and Brain Disease

As long as your immune system remains strong, any bacteria that stray away from the infected tooth are captured and destroyed. But once your immune system is weakened by something like an accident or illness or other trauma, your immune system may be unable to keep the infection in check.

 

These bacteria can migrate out into surrounding tissues by hitching a ride into your blood stream, where they are transported to new locations to set up camp. The new location can be any organ or gland or tissue.

 

Dr. Price was able to transfer diseases harbored by humans to rabbits, by implanting fragments of root-canaled teeth, as mentioned above. He found that root canal fragments from a person who had suffered a heart attack, when implanted into a rabbit, would cause a heart attack in the rabbit within a few weeks.

 

He discovered he could transfer heart disease to the rabbit 100 percent of the time! Other diseases were more than 80 percent transferable by this method. Nearly every chronic degenerative disease has been linked with root canals, including:

-Heart disease
-Kidney disease
-Arthritis, joint, and rheumatic diseases
-Neurological diseases (including ALS and MS)
-Autoimmune diseases (Lupus and more)

There may also be a cancer connection. Dr. Robert Jones, a researcher of therelationship between root canals and breast cancer, found an extremely high correlation between root canals and breast cancer.iv He claims to have found the following correlations in a five-year study of 300 breast cancer cases:

 

-93 percent of women with breast cancer had root canals
-7 percent had other oral pathology
-Tumors, in the majority of cases, occurred on the same side of the body as the root canal(s) or other oral pathology

Dr. Jones claims that toxins from the bacteria in an infected tooth or jawbone are able to inhibit the proteins that suppress tumor development. A German physician reported similar findings. Dr. Josef Issels reported that, in his 40 years of treating “terminal” cancer patients, 97 percent of his cancer patients had root canals. If these physicians are correct, the cure for cancer may be as simple as having a tooth pulled, then rebuilding your immune system.

Good Bugs Gone Bad

How are these mutant oral bacteria connected with heart disease or arthritis? The ADA and the AAE claim it’s a “myth” that the bacteria found in and around root-canaled teeth can cause diseasev. But they base that on the misguided assumption that the bacteria in these diseased teeth are the SAME as normal bacteria in your mouth—and that’s clearly not the case.

 

Today, bacteria can be identified using DNA analysis, whether they’re dead or alive, from their telltale DNA signatures.

 

In a continuation of Dr. Price’s work, the Toxic Element Research Foundation (TERF) used DNA analysis to examine root-canaled teeth, and they found bacterial contamination in 100 percent of the samples tested. They identified 42 different species of anaerobic bacteria in 43 root canal samples. In cavitations, 67 different bacteria were identified among the 85 samples tested, with individual samples housing between 19 to 53 types of bacteria each. The bacteria they found included the following types:

 

-Capnocytophagaochracea
-Fusobacteriumnucleatum
-Gemellamorbillorum
-Leptotrichiabuccalis
-Porphyromonasgingivalis

Are these just benign, ordinary mouth bugs? Absolutely not. Four can affect your heart, three can affect your nerves, two can affect your kidneys, two can affect your brain, and one can infect your sinus cavities… so they are anything BUT friendly! (If you want see just how unfriendly they can be, I invite you to investigate the footnotes.)

 

Approximately 400 percent more bacteria were found in the blood surrounding the root canal tooth than were found in the tooth itself, suggesting the tooth is the incubatorand the periodontal ligament is the food supply. The bone surrounding root-canaled teeth was found even HIGHER in bacterial count… not surprising, since bone is virtual buffet of bacterial nutrients.

 

Since When is Leaving A Dead Body Part IN Your Body a Good Idea?

There is no other medical procedure that involves allowing a dead body part to remain in your body. When your appendix dies, it’s removed. If you get frostbite or gangrene on a finger or toe, it is amputated. If a baby dies in utero, the body typically initiates a miscarriage.

 

Your immune system doesn’t care for dead substances, and just the presence of dead tissue can cause your system to launch an attack, which is another reason to avoid root canals—they leave behind a dead tooth.

 

Infection, plus the autoimmune rejection reaction, causes more bacteria to collect around the dead tissue. In the case of a root canal, bacteria are given the opportunity to flush into your blood stream every time you bite down.

 

Why Dentists Cling to the Belief Root Canals are Safe

The ADA rejects Dr. Price’s evidence, claiming root canals are safe, yet they offer no published data or actual research to substantiate their claim. American Heart Association recommends a dose of antibiotics before many routine dental procedures to prevent infective endocarditis (IE) if you have certain heart conditions that predispose you to this type of infection.

 

So, on the one hand, the ADA acknowledges oral bacteria can make their way from your mouth to your heart and cause a life-threatening infection.

 

But at the same time, the industry vehemently denies any possibility that these same bacteria—toxic strains KNOWN to be pathogenic to humans—can hide out in your dead root-canaled tooth to be released into your blood stream every time you chew, where they can damage your health in a multitude of ways.

 

Is this really that large of a leap? Could there be another reason so many dentists, as well as the ADA and the AAE, refuse to admit root canals are dangerous? Well, yes, as a matter of fact, there is. Root canals are the most profitable procedure in dentistry.

 

What You Need to Know to AVOID a Root Canal

I strongly recommend never getting a root canal. Risking your health to preserve a tooth simply doesn’t make sense. Unfortunately, there are many people who’ve already have one. If you have, you should seriously consider having the tooth removed, even if it looks and feels fine. Remember, as soon as your immune system is compromised, your risk of of developing a serious medical problem increases—and assaults on your immune system are far too frequent in today’s world.

 

If you have a tooth removed, there are a few options available to you.

1)Partial denture: This is a removable denture, often just called a “partial.” It’s the simplest and least expensive option.
2)Bridge: This is a more permanent fixture resembling a real tooth but is a bit more involved and expensive to build.
3)Implant: This is a permanent artificial tooth, typically titanium, implanted in your gums and jaw. There are some problems with these due to reactions to the metals used. Zirconium is a newer implant material that shows promise for fewer complications.

But just pulling the tooth and inserting some sort of artificial replacement isn’t enough.

 

Dentists are taught to remove the tooth but leave your periodontal ligament. But as you now know, this ligament can serve as a breeding ground for deadly bacteria. Most experts who’ve studied this recommend removing the ligament, along with one millimeter of the bony socket, in order to drastically reduce your risk of developing an infection from the bacterially infected tissues left behind.

 

I strongly recommend consulting a biological dentist because they are uniquely trained to do these extractions properly and safely, as well as being adept at removing mercury fillings, if necessary. Their approach to dental care is far more holistic and considers the impact on your entire body—not JUST your mouth.

 

If you need to find a biological dentist in your area, I recommend visiting toxicteeth.org, a resource sponsored by Consumers for Dental Choice. This organization, championed by Charlie Brown, is a highly reputable organization that has fought to protect and educate consumers so that they can make better-informed decisions about their dental care. The organization also heads up the Campaign for Mercury-Free Dentistry.

Sources and References:


Toxic Teeth: How a Root Canal Could Be Making You Sick


Root canal is a commonly performed procedure in most adults. But is it a wise one? Dr. Robert Kulacz, a dentist, has spent a significant portion of his professional career trying to answer this question.

What he discovered profoundly changed his life, and led him to write a book about his findings called, The Toxic Tooth: How a Root Canal Could Be Making You Sick, which I think is among the best available on this subject.

Dr. Kulacz began practicing dentistry in Brewster, New York. After six years as an associate, he opened his own practice in Somers, New York in 1992, where he performed all the conventional procedures of dentistry, from restorations to extractions and root canals.

“I did a lot of root canals for many years,” he says. “Everything was going smoothly until one day, a patient of mine said to me, ‘You know, I heard from my physician that root canals may be bad; that root canals may cause or contribute to other diseases in the body.’

And I said, ‘You’re crazy. Who is telling you this? That’s impossible.’ He said, ‘You got to look at this information.’ He gave me websites of organizations like the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT) to look at.

I went on to explore this topic so I could come back to him and say, ‘Here is where you’re wrong, here’s where your physician is wrong, and here is where the American Dental Association (ADA) is right.’

Lo and behold, I found out they’re right; I was wrong.

I looked at Weston Price’s work, the work of Rosenow, and others. I decided to go to an IAOMT meeting… Dr. Boyd Haley’s lecture on root canals and how toxic they are changed my life. I realized I was wrong… From that day on, I changed my practice.”

The Importance of Informed Consent

Dr. Kulacz stopped performing root canals in 1995. He doesn’t promote a ban on root canals across the board, but stresses the importance of informed consent.

The American Dental Association states that root canals are a safe procedure that cannot cause any systemic diseases, and according to Dr. Kulacz and others who have spent time investigating the matter, that’s simply not true.

“If a patient is informed that these root canal teeth remain infected; that bacteria can indeed travel to other sites in the body, and that bacteria in root canal teeth and the surrounding bone release potent toxins, then the patient can decide to have a root canal or not,” he says.

Many dentists believe they can sterilize a root canal tooth and that the act of instrumenting and irrigating the canal will eliminate all the bacteria, but that’s not the case.

“I’ve done biopsies on every root canal tooth that I have extracted. Almost all of them have remnants of necrotic debris still in that canal meaning that they were not thoroughly cleaned. Microbiological cultures of the surrounding bone showed infection almost 100% of the time.” Dr. Kulacz says.

According to the ADA, any remaining bacteria will be “entombed” within that tooth, but that’s not true either. The gutta-percha, the filling material used to seal the canal, is not getting into the tiny lateral canals that branch off the main canal, so leakage is almost always possible, especially since the tooth is porous.

And even a perfectly sealed root canal cannot prevent the small molecule exotoxins produced by the bacteria inside the root canal tooth from easily migrating out of the tooth and into the body.

The bulk of the tooth structure is composed of dentinal tubules, hollow structures that run from the main canal outward. If you were to put these tubules end to end from just a single rooted tooth, they would stretch for about three miles.

But they’re big enough to harbor bacteria three across, which you can never remove or sterilize. A tooth is more like a sponge than a solid structure.

“If you had a solid tooth structure that was like steel or a metal, you were able to clear out the main canal of that tooth, there were no tributaries, and you can perfectly seal it, and eliminate the residual infection in the surrounding jaw bone a root canal would be great. But we can’t do that,” he says.

“Now, it doesn’t mean that all root canal teeth are going to cause disease. It depends upon the type of bacteria that are in there, what kind of toxins they produce, and the immune system health of the individual.

p>But with 25 to 30 million root canals done per year, multiply that by how many years a person is alive, there’s a lot of root canals out there. And a lot of them are not good.”

Bacteria from Root Canals May Worsen Other Diseases

Since root canal teeth are chronically infected, they may contribute to a number of different health problems, including heart disease. While the ADA insists bacteria from root canal teeth can never travel to distant sites in your body, Dr. Kulacz disagrees, explaining:

“Heart disease is caused by the damage to the inside lining of the blood vessel (the cholesterol is a secondary byproduct). The primary cause of heart disease is the damage of the intima lining of the blood vessel and migration of macrophages and cholesterol inside that artery.

Inflammation causes plaque to rupture into the lumen, into the space of the blood vessel, causing a blood clot and a heart attack. [A] study done in 2013… compared the bacterial DNA in blood clots and arterial plaque in heart attack patients to the DNA of the bacteria in the mouth.

The same bacteria found in the root canal teeth and in gum disease are found in the plaques in coronary arteries and in the blood clots that caused the heart attack.

These bacteria move from the mouth into other sites of the body like the arterial plaques. They’ve also found the same bacteria in the pericardial fluid or the fluid that surrounds the heart… In heart disease you don’t want infection and inflammation in an arterial plaque.

The presence of oral bacteria from root canal teeth and gum disease in the arterial plaque and blood clots of heart attack patients points to direct causation, rather than correlation between oral infection and cardiovascular disease.”

All Root Canal Teeth Will Become More Infected Over Time

Because root canal teeth no longer have a blood supply, the bacteria remaining inside all root canal teeth are effectively “hidden” from the immune system. To make matters worse, the root canal tooth becomes more infected over time due to the influx of bacteria from the gum tissue surrounding the tooth.

Other research has shown pathogenic bacteria from infected root canals destroy or kill the white blood cells designed to eliminate them, which is why the surrounding jaw bone can harbor such chronic infection. The bacteria can also evade your immune system by:

  • Bacterial mimicry; mimicking your body’s own bacteria, which your white blood cells will not attack
  • Disabling your antibodies and white blood cells
  • Forming sticky biofilms

Decisions… Decisions…

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/oYbOvx54OOs

The video above was recorded about four years ago. In it, I discuss some of the health effects I suffered from an infected tooth, which were resolved after having the tooth extracted. It’s important to recognize that the reason you get cavities and/or infected teeth in the first place is related to your diet—primarily eating too much sugar.

If your diet is inadequate, your immune function will be compromised, and if your immune system is weakened, the bacteria’s ability to wreak havoc is magnified. So does this mean you have to extract all of your root canal teeth? No, Dr. Kulacz says.

“We can’t become so closed-minded that we ignore mainstream dentistry or mainstream medicine just because we don’t believe one part of it. Just saying that we’re going to extract all root canal teeth and we’re going to cure all disease is not valid. That’s as bad as saying that root canal teeth can’t cause any problems. We have to find the balance… we have to evaluate objectively and then come to a reasonable conclusion and protocol on what to do with these root canal teeth.”

If you’re considering having a root canal done, evaluate the data and your personal situation, such as your health risks, before making your decision. I would also suggest considering ozone therapy prior to root canal or tooth extraction. Ozone therapy is typically administered through a syringe, right into or around to the base of the tooth. Multiple visits are usually needed to address the infection. Ozone is directly toxic to infectious material, and it also stimulates your immune system.

I was able to prevent a root canal by using ozone therapy not too long ago. However if the pulp tissue has completely died due to infection, nothing, including ozone, will bring the tooth back to life. It took about five treatments. It’s safe, non-toxic, and relatively inexpensive, so it may be worth considering before taking more drastic measures.

If you decide to have the tooth extracted rather than doing a root canal, there are several options on how to restore that missing tooth. The first and least expensive option is with a removable appliance or partial denture. You need to take it out at night, put it back in in the morning, and keep it clean. It’s the least invasive way to restore missing teeth.

The second and considerably more expensive alternative is to do a bridge. The teeth on either side of the missing tooth are prepared for caps or crowns, and the missing tooth is attached to those two abutment teeth. The bridge is permanently put in as one unit. The problem is you have to cut down a lot of the enamel on the adjacent teeth, which causes trauma to those teeth, potentially risking the need for another root canal over time.

What You Need to Know About Dental Implants

The third option is a dental implant, where a screw is inserted into your jawbone after a healing time of between three and six months to ensure a base of solid, healthy bone in the jaw. Then a tooth is built upon the top of the implant. The implant functions as your root would have and you have a permanent crown that functions like your real tooth. While that may sound ideal, there potential problems to consider.

First, if you use a titanium implant, you’re placing metal into your jawbone, which can cause a galvanic or battery response with other metals in your mouth. There are reports in the literature of allergy and tissue toxicity to the metal used in dental implants that can also negatively impact health. At the very least, if you are considering a titanium dental implant, have an allergy test to all the metals present in that implant. This is especially true if you have a known sensitivity to metals.

Dr. Kulacz prefers zirconium implants, as they do not have metallic ions found in titanium implants. However, if an implant is placed into the bone where a previous root canal was done, and the bone was insufficiently cleaned out when the tooth was extracted, then your bone may still be infected. In such a case, you’re placing an implant into a chronically infected bone, which is inadvisable.

“It’s critical when you extract the root canal tooth that you remove the periodontal ligament (the little sling that holds the tooth to the jawbone), the lamina dura or socket bone (the only purpose of that socket bone is to support the tooth), and then a small amount of bone outside that space. That’s done with a slow-speed, round dental bur with copious or lots of sterile sealing and irrigation to keep the bone healthy.

If you do that, you remove the infection, you induce good blood flow into the jawbone – without blood, there is no healing – and you have a non-infected, healthy, and healed bone to which you can then place your dental implant,” he says. “Bacterial cultures and tissue biopsy of the surrounding bone after thorough socket cleaning can uncover any residual infection that may remain. This is why I do not favor immediate placement of a dental implant into the socket of a root canal tooth, preferring to wait for the results of the cultures and biopsy as well as adequate bone healing.”

Gum disease is also a common problem associated with implants. An infection or an inflammation in the gums is very similar to having an infection or inflammation in the bone or the root canal tooth. Natural teeth have a barrier against the migration of bacteria into the surrounding bone.

They are full of fibers that insert from the gum into the root of the tooth and the bone, which prevents the bacteria from getting in to the bone area. Dental implants don’t have that. They rely on a sticky coating secreted by the gum around the cuff of the collar of the post that supports the crown.

That cuff of tissue has to be maintained with good oral hygiene to prevent inflammation that might otherwise loosen the tissue around the tooth. If you have gum disease and don’t clean the implant post thoroughly, the gum disease around implants will progress much more rapidly than around a natural tooth. If you have a dental implant, it’s imperative to follow strict oral hygiene, or you may quickly end up with gum problems.

A Root Canal Tooth Is Dead, and Necrotic Tissue Tends to Cause Problems

A root canal tooth is no longer alive. It’s dead tissue, which should never be left in your body. If you have appendicitis, the surgeon just doesn’t isolate it and leave it in there. He has to remove it. Yet when it comes to teeth, this rule is ignored.

According to Dr. Kulacz, many people who came to see him—often as a last resort—were able to resolve chronic health issues once their severely infected root canal teeth were extracted and/or the infection properly treated. Interestingly, Dr. Weston A. Price was even able to reproduce people’s diseases in rabbits simply by implanting the person’s root canal tooth beneath the rabbit’s skin.1

“The ADA tries to refute Price’s work, saying it lacks adequate controls and they used too much bacteria when they inoculated the bacteria into these rabbits. Well, that’s not true. They took the actual root canal tooth and they implanted the same root canal tooth with no more bacteria than would have been found in the person from which it came.

That same tooth was implanted under the skin of rabbits. Lo and behold, they would find the same disease occur in the rabbits. The ADA says they repeated Price’s work and found it to be invalid. Well, they never have. I’ve looked for it. I’ve emailed them. There is no repeat of Price’s work. Further, current research supports Price’s assertions that bacteria from root canal teeth DO travel to distant sites in the body.”

More Information

To learn more about root canals, and/or to help educate your dentist, I strongly recommend picking up a copy of Dr. Kulacz’ book, The Toxic Tooth: How a Root Canal Could Be Making You Sick. If your dentist is honest and sincere, he or she will likely come to the same rational conclusion as Dr. Kulacz. Granted, in many cases, you’re likely to meet with resistance. This seems to be the norm before changes in thinking finally shift to the majority. In some cases the resistance can be severe.

Dr. Kulacz ended up losing his practice after the New York State dental board drummed up a series of charges against him, including “gross misconduct” for extracting root canal treated teeth. The dental board initially wanted to pull his dental license, but backed off when the prosecuting attorney admitted no dentist had actually reviewed the reams of data he’d sent in defense of his treatment—a case of misconduct on behalf of the dental board.

“I called the chancellor of the board of regents in New York State and said, ‘Your dental board is corrupt. The prosecutor admitted to me that my case was not about justice. It was not about the truth. The dental board had an agenda. They already dismissed this patient’s file as a cause of action.’

Now, I’m not a conspiracy guy. I never thought that this kind of thing could happen. In fact, if somebody would have told me in the years prior that this could happen, I would’ve thought they were crazy. But it did happen to me,” Dr. Kulacz says. “The next day, the attorney from New York State called and said, ‘The dental board is going to drop all charges if you will accept a records violation.’ They had to have something, otherwise I could go after them for false prosecution.”

Considering it would have taken several years and a quarter of a million dollars to continue fighting, he accepted the records violation—not realizing this would effectively put him out of business… He kept his dental license, but he never realized accepting the violation would increase his malpractice premium ten-fold—from $8,000 a year to $80,000. After being shut down for a year because of the board’s action, he made the painful decision not to reopen. Dr. Kulacz’ story is yet another example of what can happen to a professional who bucks the trend.

It’s not very different from the case of Ignaz Semmelweis, an ob-gyn and surgeon who, about 150 years ago, was vilified for his theory that microbes cause infection. Semmelweis was labeled “insane” by his colleagues for having the audacity to suggest they should wash their hands between deliveries, and they fired him.

He tried to continue his research but was ostracized by the medical community. His mental health eventually did deteriorate, leading to his death in an insane asylum.

Fortunately for us, Dr. Kulacz wrote a book instead of mulling on the pain and frustration of losing a two decades long career. It’s a great resource, with the details necessary to convince most rational individuals that root canals are not in the best interest of your health. And, if you have a root canal tooth, to be cautious and consider having it extracted if indicated.

Wath the video.URL:

Source:mercola.com

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