Breast malignancies in children. 


Foto: iStock.com/FatCamera

Pediatric breast malignancies are a thankfully rare occurrence, but this also means that literature is limited on this topic, says the present US-wide study. Here, the authors compared pediatric and adult breast malignancy. They found differences and similarities: Pediatric breast malignancies are more advanced at presentation, but overall survival is similar in adult and pediatric patients with invasive carcinoma.

The retrospective cohort study included close to 2 million cases from the US-American National Cancer Data Base. The authors compared patients ≤ 21 years to those > 21 years at diagnosis and estimated differences in demographic, tumor, and treatment characteristics.

The incidence of invasive breast malignancies in patients ≤ 21 year was 0.02 %. 99 % of adult patients had invasive carcinoma, compared with 64.8 % of pediatric patients; the remaining patients had sarcoma, malignant phyllodes, or malignancy not otherwise specified. Further results:

  • Pediatric patients were twice as likely to have an undifferentiated malignancy (relative risk [RR] 2.19).
  • 50 % of adults versus 22.7 % of pediatric patients presented with Stage I disease (p < 0.001).
  • Pediatric patients were 40 % more likely to have positive axillary nodes (RR 1.42).
  • Among patients with invasive carcinoma, pediatric patients were more than four times as likely to receive a bilateral than a unilateral mastectomy compared with adults (RR 4.56).
  • Overall survival was similar.

Pediatric breast malignancies are more advanced at presentation, but overall survival is similar in adult and pediatric patients.

Source: Richards, M. K. et al.: “Breast Malignancies in Children: Presentation, Management, and Survival”, Ann Surg Oncol. 2017 Jun;24:1482-1491.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s