Type 2 Diabetes Has Been “Reversed” in 40% of Patients for 3 Months.


No surgery required.

 

Type 2 diabetes is generally considered to be a chronic health condition that can’t be cured once it develops, and can only be managed with a combination of medication and healthy living – assisted by gastric band (bariatric) surgery in some cases.

But new research suggests that people may actually be able to beat the disease for set periods, by undertaking an intensive short-term course of medical treatment that’s been shown to reverse type 2 diabetes in a significant proportion of patients.

 “By using a combination of oral medications, insulin, and lifestyle therapies to treat patients intensively for two to four months, we found that up to 40 percent of participants were able to stay in remission three months after stopping diabetes medications,” says one of the researchers, Natalia McInnes from McMaster University in Canada.

“The findings support the notion that type 2 diabetes can be reversed, at least in the short term – not only with bariatric surgery, but with medical approaches.”

Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body not producing enough insulin – the hormone that enables cells to absorb glucose – or becoming insulin resistant. As a consequence, blood sugars build up in the body, and can lead to serious health problems like organ damage and heart disease.

Over 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, and estimates indicate that it could cost the US health care system as much as US$512 billion annually by 2021 – so any interventions that can effectively treat the condition are desperately needed.

To investigate whether intensive health treatments could trigger remission in type 2 diabetes patients, the researchers recruited 83 participants with the condition and randomly divided them into three groups.

Two of these groups received the short-term interventions – lasting for eight weeks or 16 weeks respectively – where they were given personalised exercise plans, meal plans that lowered their calorie intake by 500 to 750 calories a day, and regular meetings with a nurse and dietitian.

During the treatment period, they also took insulin and a set course of oral medications to help them manage the condition.

The third group of participants acted as controls, and received standard blood sugar management and health advice during the same period.

Three months after the experiment, 11 out of 27 patients in the 16-week intervention group showed complete or partial diabetes remission, as did six out of 28 individuals in the eight-week group.

Comparatively, only four of the participants in the control group showed signs of remission as a result of receiving standard, non-intensive health advice – and the team thinks this gap is evidence that there’s a lot more we can do to try and fight off, rather than just manage, the disease.

“The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse,” says McInnes.

“The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes and to achieve normal glucose levels with the help of medications.”

To be clear, that motivation and sense of purpose has to be kept up in the long term for the health gains – and subsequent diabetes reversal – to actually persist for longer than three months.

A year after the trial, the difference between participants who received the treatment and those that did not had become negligible, indicating that more work is needed to figure out how to make type 2 diabetes remission a permanent proposition.

“If you don’t sustain the lifestyle intervention, then the disease is going to come back,” endocrinologist Philip Kern from University of Kentucky, who wasn’t involved with the study, told HealthDay News.

While the remission did not persist – and the results reported here are based on only a small sample of participants in the trial – the findings are the latest to give scientists hope that type 2 diabetes can be beaten if patients commit to dietary and lifestyle changes.

Last month, a study by researchers from the University of Southern California found that a fasting diet in mice could reverse diabetes and repair the pancreas.

And in Britain, researchers being funded by charity Diabetes UK are currently running a large clinical trial to investigate whether diabetes can be reversed in the long term if people stick to a low calorie diet.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the results in 2018. In the meantime, we encourage people with type 2 diabetes to follow a healthy diet that is low in sugar, saturated fats, and salt,” Diabetes UK spokesperson Emily Burns told Sarah Knapton at the The Telegraph.

“We know that diet, exercise, and medications can help people with Type 2 diabetes to manage their condition. We’re starting to see mounting evidence that putting type 2 diabetes into remission is feasible as well.”

Source:http://www.sciencealert.com

Assessment of knowledge of Organ Donation and Transplantation


SURVEY BY: HANSEL MISQUITTA & DR. ANMOL SHARMA
Kindly select the correct options and fill in the blanks wherever necessary.
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Number of family Members *
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Medico/Non-medico? *
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Have you heard about Organ Donation? *
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If YES, what is the source of your knowledge?
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Who can donate their organs? *
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Which organs can be donated? *
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Upto what time can the organs be donated after death?
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Can someone with HIV donate their organs? *
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Do you think our country has a law for Organ Donation? *
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If YES, what is/are they?
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If anyone in your family has an illness, would you donate? *
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If NO, why?
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Would you donate your organs when you die? *
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LIVE DONATION
Most organ and tissue donations occur after the donor has died. But some organs and tissues can be donated while the donor is alive. Nearly 6,000 living donations take place each year. That’s about 4 out of every 10 donations.Most living donations happen among family members or between close friends. Some people become altruistic living donors by choosing to donate to someone they don’t know.Live Donation is from a healthy and living person. This can only be done in the case of a liver or a kidney (because the liver can grow back to its normal size, and a donor can survive on one kidney). So if a near relative of yours needs a liver or a kidney, anyone in the immediate family can donate to them.
Are you aware of complications of living/live donation?. *
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Which organs can be donated?
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Do you know what is consent? *
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IF YES, write something about pre-donation check up?
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CADAVERIC DONATION.
When we talk about pledging your organs or about organ donation, we are talking about Deceased organ donation or cadaver organ donation. This is organ donation from a person who has been declared brain dead by a team of authorized doctors at a hospital. A person is said to be brain dead when there is an irreversible loss of consciousness, absence of brain stem reflexes and no spontaneous respiration.
Would you/family member receive organ from a deceased person? *
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PROGNOSIS
Do you know the life-span of donated organs? *
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IF YES, describe
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What are the associated complications?
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ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION
What do you understand by the term ‘Brain dead’?
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Do you know the steps for organ donation before the actual transplant occurs? *
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Which Act states provisions for Organ donation in India?
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What is the current situation of Organ donation and transplantation in India?
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If you have knowledge about OD, would you help create awareness among the masses? *
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Where You Live May Determine How You Die Study Suggests


Oregon is home to the first death-with-dignity law in the U.S., and a new study shows that this state may have the best approach to allowing terminally ill patients a choice in where — and how — they want to die when it comes to quality of life palliative measures versus aggressive attempts to prolong life no matter what the cost or quality, Stat News reports.

You should always be able to choose what care you want, how you want it delivered and where, no matter at what point you are in your lifespan. Too often, your choices diminish the second you walk in a hospital, especially if you enter through the emergency room (ER).

Unless you have advance directives, once you’re in the ER, it’s too late to make end-of-life or continuing care decisions, as they will probably be made for you, especially if you’re very sick. Nearly 10,000 people who visit emergency rooms die within the first seven days of their visit, with the elderly having a greater risk to suffer a disability in the six months following the visit — which proves that now is the time to plan strategies to help prevent visits to the ER and take defensive steps if you need to use emergency care, such as taking an advocate and choosing a hospital before it is needed.

Other things you can do include embracing choices that reduce your risk of health emergencies, such as reducing your sugar and net carb intake to optimize your mitochondrial health and reduce your risk for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Massive sugar addiction can also result in obesity as well as cancer cell production, depletion of brain power, and shorter lifespans, all of which can end up putting you in the ER.

Surprisingly, your attitude can even keep you out of the ER: Research shows that a positive outlook on life is the most influential factor in longevity studies

Adults at Alzheimer’s Risk May Reverse Memory Loss with Music, Meditation


Meditation, Music May Help Reverse Early Memory Loss in Adults with Alzheimer’s Risk

A West Virginia University research team, led by Kim Innes, PhD, conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial in 60 adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), a condition that might be associated with preclinical-stage AD. They found that beginner meditation (Kirtan Kriya, or KK) or listening to music for 12 minutes a day for three months had significant benefits.

The team detailed its findings in the study, “Meditation and Music Improve Memory and Cognitive Function in Adults with Subjective Cognitive Decline: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.” It was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Participants were assigned to KK or a music listening (ML) program, and asked to practice 12 minutes per day for three months, then at their discretion for three months. Their memory and cognitive function were measured at baseline, three months and six months using the memory functioning questionnaire (MFQ), trail making test (TMT-A/B), and digit-symbol substitution test (DSST).

53 people (88%) completed the study.

Participants performed an average of 93% of sessions (91% in the KK group and 94% in ML) in the first three months, and 71% of sessions (68% in KK and 74% in ML) during the three-month follow-up period.

Both groups showed significant improvements at three months in memory and cognitive performance. At six months, overall gains were maintained or improved. The benefits did not differ by age, gender, baseline cognition scores, or any other factor.

The improvements were in cognitive functioning areas most likely to be affected in preclinical and early stages of dementia, such as attention, executive function, and subjective memory function. There were substantial gains in memory and cognition, and they were sustained or enhanced at the six-month mark.

In another paper, the team said both study groups showed improvements in sleep, mood, stress, well-being, and quality of life, particularly those in the mediation group. All the benefits were sustained or enhanced post-intervention, the researchers said.

“The findings of this trial suggest that two simple mind-body practices, Kirtan Kriya meditation and music listening, may not only improve mood, sleep, and quality of life, but also boost cognition and help reverse perceived memory loss in older adults with SCD,” the team wrote.

Source:alzheimersnewstoday.com

Low levels of ‘anti-anxiety’ hormone linked to postpartum depression: Effect measured in women already diagnosed with mood disorders.


Effect measured in women already diagnosed with mood disorders

Summary:
In a small-scale study of women with previously diagnosed mood disorders, researchers report that lower levels of the hormone allopregnanolone in the second trimester of pregnancy were associated with an increased chance of developing postpartum depression in women already known to be at risk for the disorder.

In a small-scale study of women with previously diagnosed mood disorders, Johns Hopkins researchers report that lower levels of the hormone allopregnanolone in the second trimester of pregnancy were associated with an increased chance of developing postpartum depression in women already known to be at risk for the disorder.

In a report on the study, published online on March 7 in Psychoneuroendocrinology, the researchers say the findings could lead to diagnostic markers and preventive strategies for the condition, which strikes an estimated 15 to 20 percent of American women who give birth.

The researchers caution that theirs was an observational study in women already diagnosed with a mood disorder and/or taking antidepressants or mood stabilizers, and does not establish cause and effect between the progesterone metabolite and postpartum depression. But it does, they say, add to evidence that hormonal disruptions during pregnancy point to opportunities for intervention.

Postpartum depression affects early bonding between the mother and child. Untreated, it has potentially devastating and even lethal consequences for both. Infants of women with the disorder may be neglected and have trouble eating, sleeping and developing normally, and an estimated 20 percent of postpartum maternal deaths are thought to be due to suicide, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Many earlier studies haven’t shown postpartum depression to be tied to actual levels of pregnancy hormones, but rather to an individual’s vulnerability to fluctuations in these hormones, and they didn’t identify any concrete way to tell whether a woman would develop postpartum depression,” says Lauren M. Osborne, M.D., assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “For our study, we looked at a high-risk population of women already diagnosed with mood disorders and asked what might be making them more susceptible.”

For the study, 60 pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 45 were recruited by investigators at study sites at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. About 70 percent were white and 21.5 percent were African-American. All women had been previously diagnosed with a mood disorder, such as major depression or bipolar disorder. Almost a third had been previously hospitalized due to complications from their mood disorder, and 73 percent had more than one mental illness.

During the study, 76 percent of the participants used psychiatric medications, including antidepressants or mood stabilizers, and about 75 percent of the participants were depressed at some point during the investigation, either during the pregnancy or shortly thereafter.

During the second trimester (about 20 weeks pregnant) and the third trimester (about 34 weeks pregnant), each participant took a mood test and gave 40 milliliters of blood. Forty participants participated in the second-trimester data collection, and 19 of these women, or 47.5 percent, developed postpartum depression at one or three months postpartum. The participants were assessed and diagnosed by a clinician using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, version IV for a major depressive episode.

Of the 58 women who participated in the third-trimester data collection, 25 of those women, or 43.1 percent, developed postpartum depression. Thirty-eight women participated in both trimester data collections.

Using the blood samples, the researchers measured the blood levels of progesterone and allopregnanolone, a byproduct made from the breakdown of progesterone and known for its calming, anti-anxiety effects.

The researchers found no relationship between progesterone levels in the second or third trimesters and the likelihood of developing postpartum depression. They also found no link between the third-trimester levels of allopregnanolone and postpartum depression. However, they did notice a link between postpartum depression and diminished levels of allopregnanolone levels in the second trimester.

For example, according to the study data, a woman with an allopregnanolone level of 7.5 nanograms per milliliter had a 1.5 percent chance of developing postpartum depression. At half that level of hormone (about 3.75 nanograms per milliliter), a mother had a 33 percent likelihood of developing the disorder. For every additional nanogram per milliliter increase in allopregnanolone, the risk of developing postpartum depression dropped by 63 percent.

“Every woman has high levels of certain hormones, including allopregnanolone, at the end of pregnancy, so we decided to look earlier in the pregnancy to see if we could tease apart small differences in hormone levels that might more accurately predict postpartum depression later,” says Osborne. She says that many earlier studies on postpartum depression focused on a less ill population, often excluding women whose symptoms were serious enough to warrant psychiatric medication — making it difficult to detect trends in those women most at risk.

Because the study data suggest that higher levels of allopregnanolone in the second trimester seem to protect against postpartum depression, Osborne says in the future, her group hopes to study whether allopregnanolone can be used in women at risk to prevent postpartum depression. She says Johns Hopkins is one of several institutions currently participating in a clinical trial led by Sage Therapeutics that is looking at allopregnanolone as a treatment for postpartum depression.

She also cautions that additional and larger studies are needed to determine whether women without mood disorders show the same patterns of allopregnanolone levels linked to postpartum depression risk.

If those future studies confirm a similar impact, Osborne says, then tests for low levels of allopregnanolone in the second trimester could be used as a biomarker to predict those mothers who are at risk of developing postpartum depression.

Osborne and her colleagues previously showed and replicated in Neuropsychopharmacology in 2016 that epigenetic modifications to two genes could be used as biomarkers to predict postpartum depression; these modifications target genes that work with estrogen receptors and are sensitive to hormones. These biomarkers were already about 80 percent effective at predicting postpartum depression, and Osborne hopes to examine whether combining allopregnanolone levels with the epigenetic biomarkers may improve the effectiveness of the tests to predict postpartum depression.

Of note and seemingly contradictory, she says, many of the participants in the study developed postpartum depression while on antidepressants or mood stabilizers. The researchers say that the medication dosages weren’t prescribed by the study group and were monitored by the participant’s primary care physician, psychiatrist or obstetrician instead. “We believe that many, if not most, women who become pregnant are undertreated for their depression because many physicians believe that smaller doses of antidepressants are safer for the baby, but we don’t have any evidence that this is true,” says Osborne. “If the medication dose is too low and the mother relapses into depression during pregnancy or the postpartum period, then the baby will be exposed to both the drugs and the mother’s illness.”

Osborne and her team are currently analyzing the medication doses used by women in this study to determine whether those given adequate doses of antidepressants were less likely to develop symptoms in pregnancy or in postpartum.

Only 15 percent of women with postpartum depression are estimated to ever receive professional treatment, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many physicians don’t screen for it, and there is a stigma for mothers. A mother who asks for help may be seen as incapable of handling her situation as a mother, or may be criticized by friends or family for taking a medication during or shortly after pregnancy.

Journal Reference:

  1. Lauren M. Osborne, Fiona Gispen, Abanti Sanyal, Gayane Yenokyan, Samantha Meilman, Jennifer L. Payne. Lower allopregnanolone during pregnancy predicts postpartum depression: An exploratory study. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2017; 79: 116 DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.02.012

Source: Sciencedaily.com

Addressing the availability gap of quality generic cardiology drugs in developing countries.


In September 2016, the World Health Organisation (WHO) launched the ‘Global Hearts’ initiative in order to tackle the global threat of cardiovascular disease, especially in developing countries. This is no mean feat. According to the WHO, in 2012 an estimated 17.5 million people died from CVD – that is around 31% of all deaths worldwide. [1]

One of the big issues facing patients and healthcare providers in developing countries is access to quality medicines. The United Nations Millennium Development Gap Task Force Report 2012 [2] states that just over half (51.8%) of public health facilities in developing countries are able to provide ‘essential medicines’.

There are initiatives in place to improve access to medicines, with particular regard to the production of generic drugs. However, the quality of these medicines is of great concern.

The SEVEN Study assessed the quality of seven cardiovascular drugs in 10 Sub-Saharan countries: 3468 samples were collected, 1530 were tested at random. Of these, 249 (16.3%) were of ‘poor quality’ (defined as a ratio of 85% – <95% to >105%-115% of the expected dose of the active ingredient.). [3]

An editorial published in JAMA Cardiology – ‘Evaluating and Improving the Cardiovascular Drug Supply for Better Global Health’ – [4] highlighted the results of this study. Author Mark D. Huffman, Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, US, asserts that the availability gap of quality drugs must be addressed, saying that: “Improving and maintaining the safety of the global medicine supply is a shared priority for many stakeholders including patients, physicians, governments, and payers as well as legitimate pharmaceutical manufacturers, who all benefit from a safe and effective medicine chain.” [4]

Cardio Debate recently published a series of interviews discussing the challenges of using generic drugs in cardiology. Here, Professor David Holt, Professor of Bio-Analytics at St George’s University of London says: “I am often asked if generic formulations are all the same in terms of efficacy and safety with respect to the originator formulation. The thing you have to understand for the generic regulations, the procedure you go through when you produce a generic medication, they do not look at safety and efficacy. We have a process whereby they show bioequivalence for solid dose formulations – liquid formations don’t have to show that, only that they are the same drug in the same drug.”[5, 6] This is in the context of producing generic drugs in Europe, one can only imagine the challenges in areas of the world with less stringent manufacturing regulations in place.

References

  1. http://www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/global-hearts/en/
  2. MDG Gap Task Force Report 2012. ‘The global partnership for development: Making rhetoric a reality.’
  3. Quality assessment of seven cardiovascular drugs in 10 Sub-Saharan countries. The SEVEN Study. JAMA Cardiol 2017; 2(2): 223-5.
  4. http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2569799
  5. http://www.cardio-debate.com/2017/03/06/critical-challenges-when-using-generic-agents/
  6. http://www.cardio-debate.com/2017/02/27/challenges-of-using-generic-drugs/

Source:http://www.cardio-debate.com

The Alzheimer’s-Aluminum Direct Link



Aluminum has been long known to be neurotoxic, with mounting evidence that chronic exposure is a factor in many neurological diseases, including dementia, autism, and Parkinson’s disease.

However, definitive scientific proof is difficult to establish due toth the lack of longitudinal studies, as well as pushback from industries that use aluminum in their products. Despite the shortage of conclusive studies, mounting scientific evidence really leaves little room for doubt.

Case in point: a new case study from Keele University in the UK1 unequivocally shows high levels of aluminum in the brain of an individual exposed to aluminum at work, who later died from Alzheimer’s disease.

While aluminum exposure has been implicated in Alzheimer’s and a number of other neurological diseases, this case claims to be “the first direct link” between Alzheimer’s disease and elevated brain aluminum following occupational exposure.2

The Aluminum-Alzheimer’s Link

The 66 year-old Caucasian man developed an aggressive form of early onset Alzheimer’s disease after eight years of occupational exposure to aluminum dust, which scientists conclude “suggests a prominent role for the olfactory system and lungs in the accumulation of aluminum in the brain.”

This is not the first time high aluminum levels have been found in the tissues of someone who died from Alzheimer’s disease. For example, in 2004, high aluminum levels were found in the tissues of a British woman who died of early-onset Alzheimer’s.

This was 16 years after an industrial accident dumped 20 metric tons of aluminum sulphate into her local drinking water. And there are many studies showing elevated aluminum levels in living individuals displaying a wide range of neurological symptoms.3

Aluminum Can Be an Occupational Hazard

Exposure to aluminum is unfortunately an occupational hazard for those who work in industries like mining, factory work, welding, and agriculture. Not to mention that you ingest aluminum vapors every time your nose catches cigarette smoke wafting by.

Inhaling aluminum dust or vapors sends aluminum particles directly into your lungs in a highly absorbable form, where they pass into your bloodstream and are distributed throughout your body, including your bones and brain. Aluminum powder has been known to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and aluminum factory workers are prone to asthma. Studies of the health effects of aluminum vapors have been grim, pointing to high levels of neurotoxicity.4

So why are most government regulators and physicians so resistant to looking at the health and environmental effects of aluminum? One filmmaker is shining a light on this issue by way of a documentary.

The ‘Dark Side’ of Aluminum Exposed

The featured documentary, The Age of Aluminum, reveals the “dark side” of this toxic metal, exploring the scientific links between aluminum and diseases such as breast cancer and neurological disorders. Also exposed is how aluminum mining and manufacturing have created acute ecological problems across the globe, leading to environmental disasters in Hungary, South Africa, and the UK. In the film, neuroscientist Christopher Shaw reports:5

“Many researchers are beginning to accept that aluminum has some sort of role to play in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Whether it does in others is still an open question, but Alzheimer’s is really coming into focus and it’s fairly clear that the body burden of aluminum from all the sources to which humans are exposed may be contributing to Alzheimer’s disease.”

Aluminum Is Everywhere

Although aluminum occurs naturally in soil, water, and air, we are contributing to the load with the mining and processing of aluminum ores, manufacturing of aluminum products, and the operation of coal-fired power plants and incinerators. Aluminum can’t be destroyed in the environment—it only changes its form by attaching or separating from other particles.

Rain washes aluminum particles out of the air and into our water supply, where they tend to accumulate rather than degrade. If you live in an industrial area, your exposure is undoubtedly higher than average.6

According to CDC, the average adult in the US consumes about seven to nine mg of aluminum per day in food, and a lesser amount from air and water. Only about one percent of the aluminum you ingest orally gets absorbed into your body—the rest is moved out by your digestive tract, provided it’s functioning well.

When tested in a lab, aluminum contamination has been found in a vast number of products on the market, from foods and beverages to pharmaceuticals, which suggests the manufacturing process itself is a significant part of the problem. Aluminum is found in a shocking number of foods and consumer products, including:

  • Foods such as baking powder, self rising flour, salt, baby formula, coffee creamers, baked goods and processed foods, coloring and caking agents
  • Drugs, such as antacids, analgesics, anti-diarrheals, and others; additives such as magnesium stearate
  • Vaccines—Hepatitis A and B, Hib, DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis), pneumococcal vaccine, Gardasil (HPV), and others
  • Cosmetics and personal care products such as antiperspirants, deodorants (including salt crystals, made of alum), lotions, sunscreens, and shampoos
  • Aluminum products, including foil, cans, juice pouches, tins, and water bottles

Does Your Frozen Dinner Come with a Side of Aluminum?

Aluminum contamination in our food supply is a more significant problem than you may think. In a study published in the journal Environmental Sciences Europe,7researchers analyzed 1,431 non-animal foods and beverages for aluminum content. This is what they found:

  • 77.8 percent had an aluminum concentration of up to 10 mg/kg
  • 17.5 percent had aluminum concentrations between 10 and 100 mg\kg
  • 4.6 percent of the samples had aluminum concentrations in excess of 100 mg/kg

Aluminum compounds are often used as additives in foodstuffs. Additional contamination occurs when food comes into contact with aluminum equipment and other items because aluminum is unstable in the presence of acids and bases. Aluminum equipment has a protective oxide film, but this can be damaged as fine fissures develop from normal wear and tear.In the study,8 Table 3 shows the aluminum content of everything from flour and baking mixes to soup, chocolate, beer and wine, and herbal teas. Some products show a wide range of contamination levels, and others are more homogenous. Baked goods are very high because of the common practice of baking and storing foods on aluminum trays.9 The report has numerous other tables that demonstrate how prevalent this toxin is in your food.

If you cook your food in aluminum foil, you are introducing your own contamination. One investigation found that cooking meats in aluminum foil increases their aluminum concentration. Researchers concluded, “eating meals prepared in aluminum foil may carry a health risk by adding to other aluminum sources.” As with many toxins, it isn’t one exposure here and there that is so concerning—it’s the cumulative effect of many smaller exposures over time that can lead to a toxic metal overload and erosion of your health. According to a 2006 study, cooking meat in aluminum foil increased aluminum levels as follows:10

  • Red meats cooked in aluminum foil showed an increase in aluminum by 89 to 378 percent
  • Poultry increased by 76 to 214 percent
  • Aluminum levels increased with higher cooking temperatures and longer cooking times

Aluminum Heads Straight to Your Brain

Aluminum is to your central nervous system as cigarette smoke is to your lungs. Scientists are clear that toxic metals damage brain tissue and lead to degenerative disease by producing oxidative stress—and aluminum is one of the worst offenders. With Alzheimer’s rates skyrocketing, today’s multiple avenues of aluminum exposure are of great concern. Just as with particles in the environment, once aluminum is in your tissues, your body has a difficult time releasing it. This toxic metal serves absolutely no biological purpose, so the less of it you ingest, the better.

Once in your body, it travels around easily, unimpeded, piggybacking on your iron transport system. It crosses biological barriers that normally keep other types of toxins out, such as your blood-brain barrier. Over time, aluminum can accumulate in your brain and do serious damage your neurological health—regardless of your age. Aluminum toxicity may be doing as much damage to our children as to our seniors.

Brain Inflammation in Both Children and Adults

Vaccines present a particularly problematic source of toxic metal exposure. Aluminum is the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant and is considered “safe” even though research shows it may induce serious immunological disorders and neurological complications in humans.

In the video above, Dr. David Ayoub discusses how the aluminum in vaccines may be even more dangerous than mercury. The number of aluminum-containing vaccines children receive today11 has quadrupled over the past 30 years. In the 1970s, children got only four aluminum-containing vaccines in their first 18 months of life, but now they typically receive 17. And as children’s aluminum burden has increased, so has the prevalence of childhood neurological disorders. In one school, 90 percent of the children developed ADHD during the course of a single school year, and their toxicity profiles all revealed massive amounts of aluminum.

Aluminum is also in vaccines and is used as an adjuvant. If you go by the aluminum content on vaccine labels, the amount kids are getting is excessive, but if you add in the aluminum NOT listed on the labels—”accidental exposure” due to contamination—it’s a much more serious problem. Dr. Ayoub cites one study that found five to six times more aluminum in vaccines than what was actually listed on the labels.

When you review the signs and symptoms of aluminum toxicity, they are shockingly similar to the symptoms of autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other neurological diseases. Vaccine adjuvants can cause serious chronic brain inflammation. Aluminum targets your cerebellum and autonomic nervous system—the part responsible for biological processes over which you have no conscious control (breathing, blood pressure, balance, coordination, etc.). When you look at the MSDS sheet for aluminum, you will see symptoms strikingly similar to those in common neurological diseases, including memory problems, speech impairments and aphasia, dementia, depression, muscle weakness, motor disturbances, and other neurological difficulties. The list goes on and on.12

Researchers Claim New Blood Test May Predict Alzheimer’s

There has never been a way to accurately predict who will get Alzheimer’s, but that may be changing. Researchers at Georgetown University and University of Rochester claim they have found a blood test that predicts this with 90 percent accuracy—and incredibly, with NO false negatives. If further research confirms what researchers expect, this is a medical breakthrough of epic proportions.13

The test involves measuring the patterns of 10 specific lipids (fat-like compounds) associated with the plaques found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. These 10 lipids are highly predictive of whether or not you will become cognitively impaired. All of the people in the study were in their 70s, so the next step is to determine if the test is accurate earlier, say in your 40s and 50s. Researchers say they are still several years away from implementing the test, but they all feel very hopeful.14

Biomarkers such as lipids are tricky for Alzheimer’s because they change during the course of the illness. Some occur in high levels during the early phase of the disease and then actually decrease after symptoms appear—so they are stage dependent. There is clearly much more research that needs to be done before we have a grasp of this disease.15 Even with a test that can predict whether or not you are in the process of developing dementia, there are no good treatments once you have it—so you should be doing everything in your power to prevent it. One of the strategies is helping your body detoxify from metals, such as aluminum.

Aluminum Impairs Your Body’s Ability to Detoxify

Removing mercury from vaccines and replacing it with aluminum may be increasing the problems from BOTH toxins in your body. The reason for this is because aluminum impairs your body’s ability to excrete mercury by impeding your glutathione production. Glutathione is your most important intracellular detoxifier, required for reversing oxidative stress. So, if your aluminum load is high, your body will potentially become more toxic from the mercury from, say, flu shots and fish because you are now on “aluminum overload” and your detoxification system no longer functions well.

Your body requires sulfur to manufacture glutathione, making sulfur an extremely important dietary nutrient when it comes to metal detoxification, which can be optimized through dietary sources. Onions and garlic are good if they are grown in sulfur rich soils, but most soils are unfortunately sulfur deficient. Therefore, animal-based proteins seem to be one of your best bets. Whey protein concentrate is particularly high in cysteine, one of the two sulfur-bearing amino acids that are direct precursors to glutathione.

Please note that if you avoid consuming animal proteins, it is VERY easy to become sulfur deficient, and this may be one of the most significant risk factors for choosing an animal protein-free diet. That doesn’t mean you should go overboard on meat, however! Most people need only about one gram of protein per kilogram of lean body weight, or about half a gram of protein per pound of lean body mass. Also make sure to buy grass-fed and finished meats, as most factory farmed meat is of inferior quality and contaminated with a whole host of veterinary drugs, including antibiotics and growth hormones.

How to Detoxify Aluminum

There are a number of potent chelators you can use to detoxify aluminum. Clearly, your first step would be to avoid further exposure to aluminum. This means avoiding products such as:

  • Toothpaste containing aluminium oxyhydroxide16
  • Antiperspirants containing aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate, or aluminum-zirconium compounds
  • Aluminum laminated pouch drinks
  • Aluminum cookware
  • Aluminum espresso makers

For serious Alzheimer’s disease, the following chelating agents can be helpful:

  • Silica-rich water, such as Fiji water,17 which contains 83 Mg of silica per liter. Research18 published in 2013 showed that drinking up to one liter of a silicon-rich mineral water daily for 12 weeks effectively excreted aluminum via the urine, without detrimental effects on essential metals such as iron and copper. According to the authors: “We have provided preliminary evidence that over 12 weeks of silicon-rich mineral water therapy the body burden of aluminum fell in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and, concomitantly, cognitive performance showed clinically relevant improvements in at least 3 out of 15 individuals.”
  • Melatonin: Research19, 20, 21 shows that melatonin has a metal binding role and is a useful supplement in the treatment of neurological disorders in which oxidative stress is involved, which includes Alzheimer’s. Melatonin can travel freely across all cellular barrierwas, facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as aluminum. It also appears to suppress the oxidative activity of aluminum in your brain.
  • Anything that raises your glutathione. Your body synthesizes glutathione from three amino acids: cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Raw fruits and vegetables, particularly avocado, asparagus, grapefruit, strawberries, orange, tomato, cantaloupe, broccoli, okra, peach, zucchini, and spinach are rich in the precursors glutamate and glycine. Dietary sources of cysteine include eggs, meat, red peppers, garlic, onions, Brussels sprouts, whey protein, and wheat germ. Other helpful treatments for improved glutathione metabolism include:
    • Exercise: Exercise affects your adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels needed to help produce glutathione
    • Optimizing your vitamin D levels through sun exposure: There’s some evidence vitamin D increases intracellular glutathione levels
    • Epsom salt baths
    • MSM supplementation
    • The supplement N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC) may also be useful. NAC is the rate-limiting nutrient for the formation of the intracellular antioxidant glutathione
  • Curcumin:22 Research23, 24 suggests that curcumin has a protective effect against aluminum-induced damage by modulating the extent of oxidative stress. It also decreases beta-amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer’s, delays neuron degradation, chelates metals, decreases microglia formation, and has an overall anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effect. Studies have shown that curcumin can help improve memory in Alzheimer’s patients. There are some contraindications25 that curcumin is not recommended if you have biliary tract obstruction (as it stimulates bile secretion), gallstones, obstructive jaundice, or acute biliary colic.

In Summary

It can no longer be argued that aluminum does not have a role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s—the evidence is very clear and growing. It really should not be surprising that people with aluminum toxicity display many of the same symptoms as those with dementia, Parkinson’s, ADHD, autism, and other neurological diseases, because aluminum targets exactly these areas of your brain and nervous system.

The best way to protect yourself is to be careful about your choices in food and personal products, and minimize your use of vaccines and other drugs that are often contaminated with aluminum.

Optimizing your dietary sulfur is also essential, as your body needs sulfur to manufacture its number one weapon against aluminum overload: glutathione. By taking a few steps to protect yourself, you’ll minimize your exposure while maximizing your body’s ability to rid itself of this toxic metal, which will move you toward a long and healthy life well into your senior years. For additional tips and strategies that can help prevent and/or treat Alzheimer’s, please see my previous article “Two Exciting Alzheimer’s Advances: A Novel Early Detection Test Using Peanut Butter, and a Study Evaluating Coconut Oil.”

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/IQdGBjY1xv8

Source:mercola.com

Breathing Techniques and Exercises for COPD.


Before starting these techniques, ask your Health Care Provider if they are right for you.

Having COPD makes it harder to breathe. And when it’s hard to breathe, it’s normal to get anxious, making you feel even more short of breath.

Breathing

There are two breathing techniques that can help you get the air you need without working so hard to breathe: Pursed-lips Breathing and Diaphragmatic (also called Belly or Abdominal) Breathing.

Better Breathing Tip: It’s normal to hold your shoulders tense and high. Before starting any breathing technique, take a minute to drop your shoulders down, close your eyes, and relax.

Pursed-Lips Breathing

  • Slows your breathing down
  • Keeps airways open longer so your lungs can get rid of more stale, trapped air
  • Reduces the work of breathing
  • Increases the amount of time you can exercise or perform an activity
  • Improves the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide

To do purse-lips breathing:

  1. Breathe in through your nose (as if you are smelling something) for about 2 seconds.
  2. Pucker your lips like you’re getting ready to blow out candles on a birthday cake.
  3. Breathe out very slowly through pursed-lips, two to three times as long as you breathed in.
  4. Repeat.

Pursed-Lips Breathing

Diaphragmatic (Abdominal/Belly) Breathing

The diaphragm is the main muscle of breathing. It’s supposed to do most of the work. When you have COPD, the diaphragm doesn’t work as well and muscles in the neck, shoulders and back are used. These muscles don’t do much to move your air. Training your diaphragm to take over more “work of breathing” can help.

Diaphragmatic breathing is not as easy to do as pursed-lips breathing. It is recommended that you get instruction from a respiratory health care professional or physical therapist experienced in teaching it.

This technique is best used when you’re feeling rested and relaxed, and while sitting back or lying down.

  1. Relax your shoulders.
  2. Place one hand on your chest and the other on your belly.
  3. Inhale through your nose for about two seconds.
  4. As you breathe in, your belly should move outward. Your belly should move more than your chest.
  5. As you breathe out slowly through pursed-lips, gently press on your belly. This will push up on your diaphragm to help get your air out.
  6. Repeat.

Better Breathing Tip: Stop, Reset, Continue

When you are feeling short of breath during exercise or regular activities, use these 3 steps:

  1. Stop your activity.
  2. Reset by sitting down, relax your shoulders, and do pursed-lips breathing until you catch your breath.
  3. Continue activity, doing pursed-lips breathing as you go. Go at a slower pace if you need to.

While you’re here, look over these topics to learn tips on how to live better with your COPD.+

Source:http://www.copdfoundation.org