Do You Really Think a Group ‘Asthma Attack’ Caused 8500 People to Drop Like Flies in Australia?


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‘This is one of the weirdest stories I’ve heard in a long time. So very weird that I have to call BS on the whole darned thing.

Last week, 8500 people were sent to the hospital in Melbourne, Australia during a period of five hours due to a freak storm that caused what authorities are referring to as “thunderstorm asthma.” An ambulance was dispatched every 4.5 seconds during the peak of the storm, and eight people died.

Is it just me or does this sound like a biological or chemical attack? This video explains how our government, in cooperation with the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Investigation and other world governments, have performed some unsettling testing. (Think about stuff like MK Ultra mind control experiments or the US allowing Nazi scientists to quietly continue their work in America after WWII.) It goes on to provide a compelling case against the official explanation.’

 

Last week, 8500 people were sent to the hospital in Melbourne, Australia during a period of five hours due to a freak storm that caused what authorities are referring to as “thunderstorm asthma.” An ambulance was dispatched every 4.5 seconds during the peak of the storm, and eight people died.

Is it just me or does this sound like a biological or chemical attack? This video explains how our government, in cooperation with the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Investigation and other world governments, have performed some unsettling testing. (Think about stuff like MK Ultra mind control experiments or the US allowing Nazi scientists to quietly continue their work in America after WWII.) It goes on to provide a compelling case against the official explanation.

One such example is the weaponization of extremely allergenic natural substances.

Were the citizens in Melbourne just specimens in a petri dish during a grand-scale test of a biological weapon?

Watch the video.URL:https://youtu.be/VhhI9KWa_zc

Could Einstein Have Been Wrong About The Speed Of Light?


Physicists have proposed a new experiment to test their theory that Einstein was wrong about the speed of light being a constant, the foundation on which much of modern physics is based.

Professor João Magueijo from Imperial College London and Dr. Niayesh Afshordi of the Perimeter Institute in Canada proposed back in the 1990s that there may have been a time right after the Big Bang when the speed of light was much faster than it is now.

If they’re right, it pokes a hole squarely in the foundation of physics for the last hundred years, Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity. According to Einstein, the speed of light is, was and always will be the same and so the laws of physics are the same everywhere.

The Milky Way.

 The physicists proposed the variation in light speed to explain a quirk of the early universe – its lumpy density. When the Universe first formed after the Big Bang, its density was erratic as it expanded. Traditionally, this has been explained by inflation theory, which suggests that the Universe went through an extremely rapid expansion phase before slowing down to its current rate of expansion.

The Universe as we see it today appears to be the same everywhere, with a relatively homogeneous density. But if the speed of light has always been the same, then there hasn’t been enough time for light to reach the edge of the Universe and “even out” the energy. Inflation theory suggests that the early Universe was evened out when it was very small and then suddenly expanded. Although this would explain the modern observable Universe, it means that a special set of conditions existed at that time that created the “inflation field”

In Magueijo and Afshordi’s theory, the speed of light was much higher at first, which connected the distant edges of the Universe and then that speed dropped in a predictable way as the density of the Universe changed.

Both theories fit the facts as we know them, but neither are easy to definitively prove. Magueijo and Afshordi believe they have now come up with a way to help prove their version of events after the Big Bang, using our ever-increasingly accurate readings of cosmic background radiation.

Cosmic microwave background is basically a map of the oldest light in the Universe, a “spectral index,” and the physicists believe that if the exact figure of that index is precisely 0.96478, that will prove their model of how the Universe expanded.

“The theory, which we first proposed in the late-1990s, has now reached a maturity point — it has produced a testable prediction,” said Professor Magueijo. “If observations in the near future do find this number to be accurate, it could lead to a modification of Einstein’s theory of gravity.

“The idea that the speed of light could be variable was radical when first proposed, but with a numerical prediction, it becomes something physicists can actually test. If true, it would mean that the laws of nature were not always the same as they are today.”

However, even if the “spectral index” comes back at this exact figure, there will be more work to do to definitively prove the new theory. This would be strong evidence in the right direction, but it won’t completely disprove the idea of inflation.

To irrevocably alter the foundation of modern physics, the scientists will need to have more than one piece of evidence in their favor.

Newly discovered state of memory could help explain learning and brain disorders.


Memory researchers have shone light into a cognitive limbo. A new memory—the name of someone you’ve just met, for example—is held for seconds in so-called working memory, as your brain’s neurons continue to fire. If the person is important to you, the name will over a few days enter your long-term memory, preserved by permanently altered neural connections. But where does it go during the in-between hours, when it has left your standard working memory and is not yet embedded in long-term memory?

In Science, a research team shows that memories can be resurrected from this limbo. Their observations point to a new form of working memory, which they dub prioritized long-term memory, that exists without elevated neural activity. Consistent with other recent work, the study suggests that information can somehow be held among the synapses that connect neurons, even after conventional working memory has faded.

“This is a really fundamental find—it’s like the dark matter of memory,” says Geoffrey Woodman, a cognitive neuroscientist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville who was not involved with the work. “It’s hard to really see it or measure it in any clear way, but it has to be out there. Otherwise, things would fly apart.”

Cognitive neuroscientist Nathan Rose and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin (UW) in Madison initially had subjects watch a series of slides showing faces, words, or dots moving in one direction. They tracked the resulting neural activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and, with the help of a machine learning algorithm, showed they could classify the brain activity associated with each item. Then the subjects viewed the items in combination—a word and face, for example—but were cued to focus on just one item. At first, the brain signatures of both items showed up, as measured in this round with electroencephalography (EEG). But neural activity for the uncued item quickly dropped to baseline, as if it had been forgotten, whereas the EEG signature of the cued item remained, a sign that it was still in working memory. Yet subjects could still quickly recall the uncued item when prompted to remember it a few seconds later.

Rose, who recently left UW for the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, and his colleagues then turned to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive method that uses rapidly changing magnetic fields to deliver a pulse of electrical current to the brain. They had subjects perform the same cued memory task, then applied a broad TMS pulse just after the signature of the uncued memory item had faded. The appropriate neural activity for that “forgotten” item spiked, showing the memory was reactivated into immediate consciousness from its latent state. What’s more, when the TMS directly targeted the brain areas that were initially active for the uncued item, the reactivation response was even stronger.

The study doesn’t address how synapses or other neuronal features can hold this second level of working memory, or how much information it can store. “It’s a primitive early step in understanding how we bring things into mind,” says UW cognitive neuroscientist Bradley Postle, a study co-author.

Woodman agrees. “Good studies tend to bring to light more questions than they answer,” he says. “This work absolutely does that.” Ultimately, he says, this new memory state could have a range of practical implications, from helping college students learn more efficiently to assisting people with memory-related neurological conditions such as amnesia, epilepsy, and schizophrenia.