The FDA just approved the first ‘artificial pancreas’


The FDA just approved a device that’s often referred to as an “artificial pancreas.”

The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G. It’s been approved for people with type 1 diabetes over the age of 14. It works by automatically monitoring a person’s blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed – no constant checking and injecting required.

insulin pump diabetes

Diabetes is a condition in which people have a hard time processing sugar. Type 1, in particular, is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly kills cells that are supposed to make insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food.

Insulin is produced and released through the pancreas – that’s where the term “artificial pancreas” comes in.

Roughly 1.25 million people in the US have Type 1 diabetes. These patients often opt to have an insulin pump that can administer insulin as needed throughout the day. Some also buy a glucose monitor, which is used to continuously monitor blood sugar levels; that way a diabetic can know if their levels are going too low or too high and find a way to correct it.

In contrast, the MiniMed 670G, referred to as a “hybrid closed loop” system, is what Jeffrey Shoorin of the FDA said in a statement is a “first-of-its-kind technology”: the first approved system that combines both the glucose monitor and the insulin pump in one device.

According to the FDA, the device measures blood sugar every five minutes, then responds by sending insulin into the body, or holding steady. Diabetics can also manually request insulin around mealtimes.

A clinical trial of the MiniMed 670G involving 123 people with type 1 diabetes had no serious adverse events, though the FDA notes that “risks may include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, as well as skin irritation or redness around the device’s infusion patch.”

While the device is approved as of today, Medtronic will do additional testing to see how well it works in real-life situations. The company is also conducting additional trials to see if it can be used in children 7 to 14 years old.

“We are committed to preparing for commercial launch as quickly as possible,” Francine Kaufman, M.D., chief medical officer of the Diabetes Group at Medtronic, said in a statement.

artificial pancreas

Child From A New Human Race Living in China


In the Chinese city Dahua lives child of a new human race. Little Nong Yousui has blue eyes with neon glow in the dark just like the cat’s eye  glow.

Human Race

NONG YOUSUI SEE IN THE DARKNESS AS MUCH AS WE SEE IN THE LIGHT

Such eyes are not familiar even for the inhabitants of the Nordic lands. The boy can see in the darkness as we see in the light.

After his teacher share these unusual abilities on the internet, suspicious reporter from Beijing decided to check the information with the specialists. They made an experiment in which the information is confirmed. Little Nong is the first living man that can see in the dark.

According to specialists, it is not a random change. Namely, this change isn’t a mutation consequence but more of an evolution consequence.

Nong Yousui see in the darkness as much as we see in the light

Such eyes are not familiar even for the inhabitants of the Nordic lands. The boy can see in the darkness as we see in the light.

After his teacher share these unusual abilities on the internet, suspicious reporter from Beijing decided to check the information with the specialists. They made an experiment in which the information is confirmed. Little Nong is the first living man that can see in the dark.

According to specialists, in general it is not a random change. Namely, this change isn’t a mutation consequence but more evolution consequence.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/Xfs0R-7cS_s

Coconut Oil for Reversing Alzheimer’s Disease Now Clinically Studied


coconutoilll

Coconut Oil for Reversing Alzheimer’s Disease Now Clinically Studied

 

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/mMw3d3ohx_s

A Swedish scientist is using CRISPR to genetically modify healthy human embryos 


This is happening.

 

For the first time, scientists have edited DNA in healthy and viable human embryos using genetic tool CRIPR/Cas9.

The researchers, led by developmental biologist Fredrik Lanner from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, hope the research will lead to new ways to treat infertility and prevent miscarriage.

 “Having children is one of the major drives for a lot of people,” Lanner told Rob Stein at NPR. “For people who do struggle with this, it can tend to become an extremely important part of your life.”

Although Chinese scientists made headlines back in April for genetically modifying human embryos, those embryos were unusable for IVF, and would never have been able to develop into healthy infants.

But two-day-old embryos Lanner is using are still viable, and were all donated by couples at an IVF clinic in Sweden.

The researchers are attempting to edit genes in these embryos to regulate certain aspects of their development. If the genes are removed and the embryo no longer functions, it signals that a particular gene is essential for embryotic growth.

However, Lanner says these embryos are only being studied for the first seven days of growth, and will be destroyed after 14 days.

As well as finding out crucial information about how embryos develop, this could help researchers who are investigating the potential of using embryonic stem cells to treat disease.

 “If we can understand how these early cells are regulated in the actual embryo, this knowledge will help us in the future to treat patients with diabetes, or Parkinson’s, or different types of blindness and other diseases,” Lanner says.“That’s another exciting area of research.”

The researchers are hoping to knock out a series of genes that have been identified as crucial to normal embryonic development.

As Stein explained:

“He hopes that will help him learn more about what the genes do and which ones cause infertility. He declined to specify which genes he’s targeting until the work is reviewed and published.”

The CRISPR/Cas9 technique has revolutionised the way geneticists are tackling disease. Earlier this year, scientists removed HIV from human immune cells, and in June, it was announced that scientists are looking to use the technique to alter human T-cells to fight cancer.

However, we haven’t fully nutted out the CRISPR system just yet. The T- cell side effects were incredibly severe, and the HIV came back not long after – but the technology is still a huge deal.

So how does CRISPR work? As Bec Crew explained for us earlier this year, “The technique works by guiding ‘scissor-like’ proteins to targeted sections of DNA within a cell, and then prompting them to alter or ‘edit’ them in some way.”

In other words, the system ‘cuts’ out sections of genes much more precisely than ever before.  Lanner himself calls the technique a “game changer”.

“It’s not just quicker or cheaper,” Lanner says. “This actually opens the door to start to look at this for the first time, because we could not do this at all previously in the human embryo. The technology was just not efficient enough to try to look at individual gene function as the embryo develops.”

At a recent international genetics summit, it was advised that editing an embryo intended to start a pregnancy should not be allowed, but in certain countries, including Sweden, carrying out the technique on viable embryos for research purposes remains legal.

Understandably, there is still a lot of controversy over using human embryos for research. Critics say this opens a pathway to ‘designer babies’ of the future, or could accidentally introduce heritable mutations in the human population.

“The fear is that they could use these techniques to create, someway, genetically modified people. You know, designer babies where parents pick and choose the traits of their babies, make them taller, stronger, smarter, or something like that,” Stein said to news.com.

“We’re nowhere near being able to do that but the concern is that this could open the door to someway somebody trying that.”

The team is still in early stages of research for now, so we’ll have to wait for their results to appear in a peer-reviewed journal before we can find out what insights they’ve gleaned.

Watch the video. URL:https://youtu.be/jAhjPd4uNFY