3 ‘Modern’ Inventions That Existed Millions of Years Ago: Nuclear Reactor, Telescope, Clothes


In Beyond Science, Epoch Times explores research and accounts related to phenomena and theories that challenge our current knowledge. We delve into ideas that stimulate the imagination and open up new possibilities. Share your thoughts with us on these sometimes controversial topics in the comments section below.

Evidence exists pointing to prehistoric civilizations as advanced as our modern civilization—or perhaps more advanced.

Such evidence could turn our scientific certainties upside down. It wouldn’t be the first time—the history of science proves, after all, that science has been grossly wrong on countless occasions.

Paradigm shifts are ushered in amid abundant controversy. The following discoveries have been contested, but some scientists have maintained that they constitute indisputable evidence that tens of thousands, or even many millions of years ago, humans walked the earth with as much knowledge and culture as today’s people.

1. A Nuclear Reactor 1.8 Billion Years Old

In 1972, a French factory imported uranium ore from Oklo, in Africa’s Gabon Republic. To its surprise, it found the uranium had already been extracted.

They found the site of origin to be a large-scale highly advanced nuclear reactor that came into being 1.8 billion years ago and was in operation for some 500,000 years.

Scientists gathered to investigate, with many explaining it away as a wondrous, yet natural, phenomenon.

Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg, former head of the United States Atomic Energy Commission and Nobel Prize winner for his work in the synthesis of heavy elements, explained why he believes it wasn’t a natural phenomenon, and thus must be a man-made nuclear reactor.

For uranium to “burn” in a reaction, very precise conditions are needed.

The water must be extremely pure, for one. Much purer than exists naturally anywhere in the world.

The material U-235 is necessary for nuclear fission to occur. It is one of the isotopes found naturally in uranium.

Several specialists in reactor engineering have said they believe the uranium in Oklo could not have been rich enough in U-235 for a reaction to take place naturally.

Furthermore, it seems the reactor was more advanced than anything we could build today. It was several miles in length and the thermal impact to its environment was limited to 40 meters (about 131 feet) on all sides. The radioactive waste is still contained by surrounding geological elements and has not migrated beyond the mine site.


The Oklo, Gabon Republic, nuclear reactor site.

2. Peruvian Stone Showing an Ancient Telescope, Modern-Style Clothing

It is thought that Galileo Galilei invented the telescope in 1609. A stone believed to have been engraved as long as 65 million years ago, however, shows a human figure holding a telescope and observing the stars.

About 10,000 stones housed in the Cabrera Museum in Ica, Peru, show prehistoric humans wearing headdresses, clothes, and shoes. The stones depict scenes similar to organ transplants, cesarean sections, and blood transfusions—and some show encounters with dinosaurs.

While some say the stones are fake, Dr. Dennis Swift, who studied archaeology at the University of New Mexico, documented in his book “Secrets of the Ica Stones and Nazca Lines” evidence that the stones date back to Pre-Columbian times.

Swift says one of the reasons the stones were considered fake in the 1960s is that, at the time, it was believed dinosaurs walked dragging their tails, but the stones depict dinosaurs with their tails up, and thus were thought to be inaccurate.

Later studies showed, however, that dinosaurs likely walked with their tails up, as depicted on the stones.

3. Advanced Culture in Cave Paintings

The La Marche caves in west-central France contain depictions over 14,000 years old of people with short hair, groomed beards, tailored clothing, riding horseback and suited in modern style—a far cry from the animal-skin loin cloths we usually imagine.

These paintings were confirmed as genuine in 2002. Investigators, such as Michael Rappenglueck of the University of Munich, insist that these important artifacts are simply ignored by modern science.

Rappenglueck has studied the advanced astronomical knowledge of Palaeolithic people. He writes: “For some years it has been left to broader media coverage (in the form of printed matter, audio-visual material, electronic media and planetarium programs) to raise awareness of proto-astronomy (as well as proto-mathematics and other proto-sciences) during Palaeolithic times.”

Some of the stones from La Marche cave are on display at Paris’s Museum of Man, but the ones that clearly portray prehistoric people with advanced culture and thought are not to be seen.


Cave painting from the cave of Altamira in the Anthropos Pavilion of The Moravian Museum in the Czech Republic. 

When paintings from more than 30,000 years ago were first discovered in the caves of Europe in the 19th century, they challenged the commonly accepted understanding of prehistory. One of the greatest critics of the discovery, Emile Cartailhac, came around decades later and became a leading force in proving the paintings are genuine and raising awareness of their importance.

He is now considered a founding father of cave art studies.

The first paintings were discovered by Don Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola, a Spanish nobleman, and his daughter, Maria, in 1879 in the Altamira cave. They showed an unexpected sophistication.

The discovery was dismissed, until the early 20th century when Cartailhac published a study of the paintings.

Russia Has Decided To BAN The Use Of Genetically Modified Ingredients


Russia has announced a game-changing move in the fight against Monsanto’s GMOs, completely banning the use of genetically modified ingredients in any and all food production.

Russia

In other words, Russia just blazed way past the issue of GMO labeling and shut down the use of any and all GMOs that would have otherwise entered the food supply through the creation of packaged foods (and the cultivation of GMO crops).

“As far as genetically-modified organisms are concerned, we have made decision not to use any GMO in food productions,” Deputy PM Arkady Dvorkovich revealed during an international conference on biotechnology.

This is a bold move by the Russian government, and it sits in unison with the newly-ignited global debate on GMOs and the presence of Monsanto in the food supply. It also follows the highly-debated ruling by the World Health Organization that Monsanto’s glyphosate-based Roundup is a ‘probable carcinogen.’

But I also want to put it into perspective for you. If this announcement were to be made in the United States, for example, it would mean a total transformation of the food manufacturing industry. But in Russia, the integration of GMOs is not close to the same level as in the U.S.

We know that, in the United States, 90 plus percent of staple crops like corn are genetically modified, along with 94 percent of soybeans and 94 percent of cotton. A ban on GMOs in food production would radically change the entire food supply. In Russia, however, the country is much more poised for a GMO food revolution.

As RT reports:

“According to official statistics the share of GMO in the Russian food industry has declined from 12 percent to just 0.01 percent over the past 10 years, and currently there are just 57 registered food products containing GMO in the country. The law ordering obligatory state registration of GMO products that might contact with the environment will come into force in mid-2017.”

 

President Vladimir Putin believes that he can keep GMOs out of the country, even while staying in compliance with the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) commandments. In a past meeting addressing the members of the Board of the Russian Federation Council he stated:

“We need to properly construct our work so that it is not contrary to our obligations under the WTO. But even with this in mind, we nevertheless have legitimate methods and instruments to protect our own market, and above all citizens.”

Ten million more Americans smoke marijuana now than 12 years ago


Research published in Lancet Psychiatry also finds number who admit to smoking on ‘daily or near daily basis’ more than doubled to 8.4 million

marijuana growers
The study comes as at least five states prepare to vote on legalizing recreational use of marijuana in November. 

About 10 million more Americans smoke marijuana now than 12 years ago, a new study in the British medical journal Lancet Psychiatry has found.

The study comes as at least five states ready to vote on whether to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes, including California, which is considered a linchpin in the campaign for federal legalization.

“We certainly expected, based on other research, to find an increase” in marijuana use, said said Dr Wilson M Compton, an author of the study and researcher at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “It’s well known in the US that the laws related to marijuana have been changing; we’ve seen a number of states passing laws to allow marijuana for medical purposes.”

The study used data from 596,500 adults surveyed between 2002 and 2014 for the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health to reach its conclusions about how many Americans use marijuana.

One of the study’s key findings is that between 2002 and 2014, the percentage of Americans who said they smoked marijuana at least once in the previous year grew from 10.4% to 13.3%.

The 2.9% increase equates to an additional 10 million Americans who said they used the drug at least once in the past year, bringing the population who admitted use from 21.9 million in 2002 to 31.9 million in 2014.

One of the most surprising findings, Compton said, “is how many people there are using marijuana in a daily or near daily basis”.

That number more than doubled, from 3.9 million to 8.4 million, or 1.9% of the US population to 3.5%, over the same period. The proportion of adults who first tried marijuana also increased, from 0.7% to 1.1%.

However, researchers did not find a rise in the proportion of Americans who abused marijuana, called a “use disorder” in psychiatric terms. That number stayed flat at 1.5% of the general population. The figure contradicts a survey the federal government released last year, which found the rate of people who abused marijuana roughly doubled from 1.5% to 2.9% between 2001 and 2012.

“Our findings showed a sharp increase,” said Deborah Hasin, a professor of epidemiology in psychiatry at Columbia University. Hasin was lead author of theNational Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which found the sharp increase in use disorders. “That’s consistent with a sharp increase of people going to emergency rooms with marijuana use, marijuana-related driving and fatal car crashes, and in Veterans Administration medical records,” Hasin said.

The aim of the Lancet Psychiatry’s study was to determine whether shifting attitudes about marijuana impacted Americans’ perception of harm, and therefore use of marijuana.

Researchers found Americans saw marijuana as less risky, and that the most precipitous shift in attitude happened around 2007. The proportion of Americans who said using marijuana twice a week posed a “great risk” to health fell from 50.4% in 2002 to 33.3% in 2014.

“I still don’t know why 2007,” said Compton. “I can’t think of any sentinel event that happened in that year; the best we’ve come up with is the laws started changing enough to see public attitudes change enough.”

“As for the reduction in the perceived risks of cannabis, this needs to be taken into context,” said Amir Englund, a PhD in Cannabinoid Psychopharmacology, also at King’s College London. “Some maybe have previously believed classic cannabis scaremongering such as ‘one toke and you go mad/become a heroin addict’.

“However, it would be wrong to think that cannabis has no risks,” said Englund.

Pro-marijuana legalization groups welcomed the study published in the Lancet Psychiatry, particularly its finding that the number of those who abused marijuana had not increased.

“It really highlights what a lot of people already know to be true,” said Mason Tvert, spokesman for the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project. “Countless adults consume marijuana responsibly and should not be treated as if they are drug abusers.”

Researchers concluded that the trend of increased use indicated “a need for education regarding the risk of smoking marijuana and prevention messages”, though even those harms are hotly debated.

Some of the most pressing questions about marijuana use, such as association with psychiatric disorders, impaired driving or the impact of legalization were not addressed in the study. Nor was childhood or adolescent marijuana use.

A 2007 review of available evidence published Lancet Psychiatry concluded there was enough evidence to warn young people that marijuana use could “increase their risk of developing a psychotic illness later in life”, but that further long-term studies would be unlikely to untangle whether marijuana causes psychosis.

Many American researchers have complained that a lack of scientific-grade marijuana has made investigating these questions nearly impossible. Until this August, the only licensed supplier of marijuana for scientific research in the US is the University of Mississippi.

In November, residents of Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada will vote on whether to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes. Arkansas, Florida, Montana and North Dakota will vote on whether to legalize medical marijuana.

Male Birth Control, Without Condoms, Will Be Here by 2017.


Vasalgel, a reversible, non-hormonal polymer that blocks the vas deferens, is about to enter human trials. How will rhetoric change when male bodies become responsible for birth control?

Vasalgel, a reversible form of male birth control, just took one step closer to your vas deferens.
According to a press release from the Parsemus Foundation, a not-for profit organization focused on developing low-cost medical approaches, Vasalgel is proving effective in a baboon study. Three lucky male baboons were injected with Vasalgel and given unrestricted sexual access to 10 to 15 female baboons each. Despite the fact that they have been monkeying around for six months now, no female baboons have been impregnated. With the success of this animal study and new funding from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Parsemus Foundation is planning to start human trials for Vasalgel next year. According to their FAQ page, they hope to see it on the market by 2017 for, in their words, less than the cost of a flat-screen television.
So how does Vasalgel work? It is essentially a reimagining of a medical technology called RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) that was developed by a doctor named Sujoy Guha over 15 years ago in India, where it has been in clinical trials ever since. Unlike most forms of female birth control, Vasalgel is non-hormonal and only requires a single treatment in order to be effective for an extended period of time. Rather than cutting the vas deferens—as would be done in a vasectomy—a Vasalgel procedure involves the injection of a polymer contraceptive directly into the vas deferens. This polymer will then block any sperm that attempt to pass through the tube. At any point, however, the polymer can be flushed out with a second injection if a man wishes to bring his sperm back up to speed.

The Parsemus Foundation’s messaging on Vasalgel has focused on making the technology appealing to men. In a New York Times op-ed published this year, Elaine Lissner of the Parsemus Foundation pitches the product to “a 20-something or 30-something man, out on the dating market” who is worried about the effectiveness of the pill, given how many women forget to take pills during any given cycle. This pitch, too, is a plea for help. The Parsemus Foundation has to rely on donations and crowdfunding in order to bring male birth control to the market. Long-term treatments like Vasalgel are much less appealing to potential funders in the pharmaceutical industry who, as they observe, would much rather “sell pills to men’s partners every month.” Why sell a flat-screen television to a man, after all, when you can rent one to a woman for a decade?
In other words, the medical industry’s investment in the multibillion-dollar female birth control industry might block men’s access to male birth control just as effectively as Vasalgel would block their sperm. But a contraceptive polymer like Vasalgel would be a major medical innovation for more than just the man about town looking to copulate without consequence. In fact, male birth control could be the next major medical advance in women’s health, as strange as that idea seems.
If the use of polymer contraceptives were to become widespread, male birth control would completely transform the ways in which we understand sexual and reproductive health. Ever since men started wrapping animal intestines around their penises hundreds of years ago, we have been approaching birth control as a way of temporarily preventing fertilization inside a woman’s body. But what if we haven’t been able to see the forest through the ovaries? What if we could use polymer contraceptives like Vasalgel to block sperm at the source, rather than implementing expensive, convoluted, and potentially harmful contraceptive countermeasures inside women’s bodies?
If Vasalgel were to become as widespread and inexpensive as the Parsemus Foundation expects, unintended pregnancies could be substantially reduced. According to the Center for Disease Control, nearly half of pregnancies in the United States are unintended. That figure rises to 80 percent of all pregnancies among women age 19 and younger, and to 90 percent below age 15. The physical, financial, and emotional toll of an unintended pregnancy can be immense. As a report from the Guttmacher Institute notes, the average cost of an abortion is $485, which “pose[s] a major financial burden for women seeking these services,” who are often lower income. Not all unintended pregnancies are unwanted, however, and given the fact that modern birth control has deep roots in Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s belief in eugenics, the benefits of male birth control for lower-income families in particular should not be overemphasized.
Even if we set the prevention of unintended pregnancies aside, however, the potentially deleterious side effects of female birth control are enough to justify the implementation of Vasalgel on their own. As WomensHealth.Gov notes, side effects of the birth control pill include an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, blood clots, nausea, irregular bleeding, and depression. Less common methods of contraception like diaphragms and sponges can cause the rare and life-threatening toxic shock syndrome (TSS). Injections like Depo-Provera can cause bone loss and the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) can potentially cause rips or tears in the uterus itself. It would take a commercial announcer a full minute of speed-reading to list off all the risks of every form of female birth control. Interrupting ovulation and fertilization is a complex process that requires a degree of hormonal regulation, often impacting other areas of a woman’s health.
But as luck would have it, you don’t have to tamper with testosterone in order to block sperm. It might seem as if men are unstoppable sperm machines, especially given the fact they produce 1,500 of them per second. But because sperm are as fickle as they are plentiful, technologies like Vasalgel and RISUG need not interfere with the production of sperm itself in the same way that female birth control often interferes with ovulation. Like the Little Dutch Boy walking by a dike on the brink of bursting, Vasalgel can simply plug up the vas deferens and stop an entire sea of sperm from crashing through. It promises to be a parsimonious solution to the age-old problem of preventing unwanted pregnancies. This is nothing short of Occam’s razor for your testicles.

While the way Vasalgel works inside a man’s body might be simple, its cultural impact would be complex. The Religious Right, in particular, has grown accustomed to a world in which regulating access to birth control means regulating women’s bodies, rather than men’s bodies. Although the Affordable Care Act began offering women no-to-low-cost contraceptive coverage in 2010, the Supreme Court’s now-infamous Hobby Lobby ruling this summer allowed “closely-held corporations” to offer health insurance plans without contraceptive coverage. The Hobby Lobby ruling is already being used to try to undermine Obamacare’s contraceptive requirement altogether. This week, Missouri state Representative Paul Wieland’s lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services went to the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The court will consider whether or not it is constitutional for “closely-held corporations” to be able to opt out of contraceptive coverage while states like Missouri cannot.
Lost in all of this legal conflict, however, is the fact that Hobby Lobby, of course, still covers vasectomies. But what if vasectomies were cheap, non-invasive, fully reversible, and as widespread as the female birth control pill? Would businesses like Hobby Lobby begin to object to them? If Vasalgel became popular and affordable enough to surpass female birth control, it would put the Religious Right’s opposition to contraception to the test. As The New York Times reported in 2012, many on the Religious Right justify their opposition to some forms of birth control by equating them with abortion because they “prevent the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus.” But if men’s bodies became the primary site for birth control, would religious leaders shift their rhetoric and take issue with a technology like Vasalgel on the grounds that it prevents life on a massive scale? Or do debates about life only have meaning when they take place over women’s bodies?
If the Parsemus Foundation’s optimistic timeline for the release of Vasalgel holds true, we may be forced to confront these questions sooner than expected. In the meantime, men, prepare for the possibility that you may soon take over primary responsibility for contraception from your wife or girlfriend. The future of birth control is coming and soon it might be inside of you.

The iPhone 7 is going to come with ‘the world’s most anticipated dongle’


The iPhone 7 is going to remove the headphone jack and come packaged with “the world’s most anticipated dongle” that will let you use your existing headphones, according to analysts at Pacific Crest.

Apple iPhone 7 dongle headphone adaptor

A series of rumours have claimed the iPhone 7 won’t have a normal headphone jack, instead Apple is expected to remove that port entirely and encourage headphone manufacturers to release models that plug directly into the Lightning port (which you also use to charge your phone).

Of course, not everybody is going to have a pair of Lightning headphones. Lots of people are going to want to use their old-fashioned, non-Lightning headphones. Because of that, Apple is expected to include an adaptor in the box with the new iPhone 7, and Pacific Crest is calling it “the world’s most anticipated dongle” in a note published on August 31.

The decision to drop the headphone port is already proving controversial (and it hasn’t been officially announced yet). The Verge published an article titled “Taking the headphone jack off phones is user-hostile and stupid” and Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak said that “if it’s missing the 3.5 mm earphone jack, that’s going to tick off a lot of people.”

9 Tips For Flushing Nicotine From Your Body Naturally


Smoking a cigarette releases nicotine into your bloodstream which is pleasurable for the smoker, but for that nicotine to leave your body it takes 6-8 hours, of which most is released when urinating. Regarding nicotine stored in your body, it takes 48-72 hours and 20-30 days for the nicotine’s byproduct cotinine to leave your body. Studies show that if you eat more fruit and vegetables rich in metabolism boosting vitamin C nicotine leaves your bloodstream faster. Namely, a survey made by public health researchers from the University of Buffalo surveyed 1,000 smokers aged 25 or older throughout the country. Fourteen months later, the researchers checked if the participants had abstained from tobacco during the previous month.

The result was that the ones who ate the most vegetables and fruit were 3 times more inclined to stay off tobacco compared to those who consumed smaller amounts, for at least 30 days. Also they scored better on a nicotine-dependency test and smoked less frequently per day. The reasons people who ate more vegetables and fruit have an easier time quitting cigarettes include: they make people feel sated, because smokers occasionally confuse hunger with cigarette craving; lowered nicotine dependence; fruit and vegetables could make the taste of tobacco repulsive, unlike alcohol, coffee or meat; a healthier lifestyle has a better chance at making smokers give up their smoking. How To Flush Out Nicotine From Your Body Naturally Water hydrates the body unlike dehydrating nicotine. Water flushes nicotine from the system because nicotine forms salts with acids that are usually solid and water soluble. Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A,

Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health.

Fourteen months later, the researchers checked if the participants had abstained from tobacco during the previous month. The result was that the ones who ate the most vegetables and fruit were 3 times more inclined to stay off tobacco compared to those who consumed smaller amounts, for at least 30 days. Also they scored better on a nicotine-dependency test and smoked less frequently per day. The reasons people who ate more vegetables and fruit have an easier time quitting cigarettes include: they make people feel sated, because smokers occasionally confuse hunger with cigarette craving; lowered nicotine dependence; fruit and vegetables could make the taste of tobacco repulsive, unlike alcohol, coffee or meat; a healthier lifestyle has a better chance at making smokers give up their smoking. How To Flush Out Nicotine From Your Body Naturally Water hydrates the body unlike dehydrating nicotine. Water flushes nicotine from the system because nicotine forms salts with acids that are usually solid and water soluble. Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health…. Read More:

The reasons people who ate more vegetables and fruit have an easier time quitting cigarettes include: they make people feel sated, because smokers occasionally confuse hunger with cigarette craving; lowered nicotine dependence; fruit and vegetables could make the taste of tobacco repulsive, unlike alcohol, coffee or meat; a healthier lifestyle has a better chance at making smokers give up their smoking. How To Flush Out Nicotine From Your Body Naturally Water hydrates the body unlike dehydrating nicotine. Water flushes nicotine from the system because nicotine forms salts with acids that are usually solid and water soluble. Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A,

Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from

Water flushes nicotine from the system because nicotine forms salts with acids that are usually solid and water soluble. Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health.

Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health…. Read More:

Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health…. Read More:

How To Flush Out Nicotine From Your Body Naturally Water hydrates the body unlike dehydrating nicotine. Water flushes nicotine from the system because nicotine forms salts with acids that are usually solid and water soluble. Vegetables, such as eggplant, beans, cucumbers, and celery influence cigarette taste, decreasing nicotine dependence. However, don’t consume too much sweet vegetables since their sugar level is high and that could disturb the balance in the brain pleasure areas, in turn increasing the desire for smoking. Nettle has a high concentration of iron, great for combating infection. Kiwi purges nicotine from your body and restores vitamins A, C and E, which are reduced from smoking. Pine needle tea has been used for mouth and throat disinfection for a long time, although it could also help with lung health. Orange has high levels of vitamin C which can replace its loss in your body, since smoking reduces it. It also reduces stress and fastens your metabolism, enabling faster nicotine removal. Spinach has an abundance of vitamins and folic acid which is excellent for your body as well as making tobacco taste repulsive. Broccoli has high amounts of vitamin B5 and C, replenishing lost vitamin C and protects your lungs from toxin damage. Carrot juice helps with nicotine removal by having high levels of vitamin A, B, C and K. Because nicotine damages your skin, carrot juice works wonders for your skin’s health.

Vaping as bad for your heart as smoking cigarettes, study finds


Electronic cigarettes may be “far more dangerous” than was thought
Electronic cigarettes may be ‘far more dangerous’ than was thought 

Vaping could be as bad for the heart as smoking cigarettes, a new study suggests.

The findings triggered warnings that electronic cigarettes may be “far more dangerous” than was thought.

Trials found that a typical session using a device caused similar effects to the main heart artery as smoking a cigarette.

The research, presented at the world’s largest cardiology conference, comes amid growing controversy about the safety of e-cigarettes.

Vapers enjoy different flavours at Vape Lab in Shoreditch, London
Vapers enjoy different flavours at Vape Lab in Shoreditch, London

Last year Public Health England (PHE) endorsed vaping, claiming the habit was 95 per cent safer than smoking. GPs will soon be able prescribe them to help smokers who are trying to give up.

Researchers at the European Society for Cardiology congress  in Rome said such steps were premature – and that they would not encourage the use of the devices.

British heart experts said the findings were important, and said much more research was needed to examine the long-term safety of e-cigarette use.

The trial involved a group of adult smokers, whose hearts were monitored while they vaped, and when they smoked ordinary cigarettes.

Researchers said a a typical vaping session had a similar impact on stiffness of the aorta – the main artery into the heart – as smoking one regular cigarette.

Lead researcher Prof Charalambos Vlachopoulos, from the University of Athens Medical School said: “We measured aortic stiffness. If the aorta is stiff you multiply your risk of dying, either from heart diseases or from other causes.”

Although the study was not designed to show whether electronic cigarettes can cause long term damage to our blood vessels, it shows that [they] cannot be assumed to be risk freeProf Peter Weissberg, Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation

The unfavourable effects shown from a 30 minute session vaping – described by researchers as a typical habit – were similar to those from five minutes’ smoking a cigarette, the study found.

“The aorta is like a balloon next to the heart,” he said. “The more stiff the balloon is, the more difficult for the heart to pump. It’s the most powerful biomarker we have for estimating cardiovascular risk.”

The experiments, which involved 24 adults with an average age of 30, only examined the immediate effects of e-cigarettes and smoking.

The cardiologist said the long-term risks of vaping remain unknown – but that he would not recommend their use.

”The value of the acute study is that it gives an insight of how long your aorta is stressed throughout the day – because this happens throughout the day, this is something that happens repeatedly,” he said.

“There could be long term heart dangers. They are far more dangerous than people realise.”

He criticised PHE’s stance on e-cigarettes.

“I wouldn’t recommend them now as a method to give up smoking. I think the UK has rushed into adopting this method,” he said.

Office of National Statistics data shows a record 2.2million Brits regularly used e-cigarettes in 2015.

Prof Peter Weissberg, medical director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “This important study tries to determine if e-cigarette smoking has any harmful effects on our blood vessels.

He said: “The findings show that electronic cigarettes have a similar effect to normal cigarettes on the stiffness of the main blood vessel in the body.

“Although the study was not designed to show whether electronic cigarettes can cause long term damage to our blood vessels, it shows that [they] cannot be assumed to be risk free.

“Much more research is needed to establish the safety of long term use of these devices.”

Nigel Farage: E-cigarettes are ‘jolly good’Play!00:32

However, Deborah Arnott, chief executive of Action on Smoking and Health, said: “This study does not prove that e-cigarettes are as hazardous as smoking.”  She highlighted other findings from the study, showing that if a vaping session was limited to five minutes, the impact on aortic stiffness was significantly less than that associated with a cigarette.

Tom Pruen, chief scientific officer for the Electronic Cigarette Industry Trade Association, said: “Lots of things have short term effects on aortic stiffness – and nicotine is already known to do this. On the other hand, so does caffeine, and in both cases it is transitory, without any significant long term effect.”

Rosanna O’Connor, from Public Health England, said: “Vaping carries a fraction of the risk of smoking yet many smokers are still not aware, which could be keeping people smoking rather than switching to a much less harmful alternative.”

Sir David Attenborough backs campaign to limit human population


Sir David Attenborough has said that a “frightening explosion in human numbers” was behind every threat to wildlife across the world.

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Sir David Attenborough: Sir David Attenborough backs campaign to limit human population

Sir David Attenborough has become patron of The Optimum Population Trust

The veteran broadcaster made his comments as he became patron of a group seeking to cut the growth in human population.

The Optimum Population Trust (OPT) believes Earth may not be able to support more than half its present numbers before the end of the century.

In a statement released on the organisation’s website, Sir David, 82, said: “I’ve seen wildlife under mounting human pressure all over the world and it’s not just from human economy or technology – behind every threat is the frightening explosion in human numbers.

“I’ve never seen a problem that wouldn’t be easier to solve with fewer people, or harder, and ultimately impossible, with more.

“That’s why I support the OPT, and I wish the environmental NGOs would follow their lead, and spell out this central problem loud and clear.”

World population is projected to rise from 6.8 billion today to 9.1 billion in 2050, it says.

OPT chairman Roger Martin said he was “delighted” to welcome Sir David as patron and added: “All serious environmentalists know perfectly well that population growth, exploding in the 20th century, has been a key driver of every environmental problem.

In January, Sir David revealed he received hate mail from viewers for not crediting God in his nature programmes.

His latest documentary on Charles Darwin and natural selection marked two centuries since Darwin’s birth and 150 years since the groundbreaking On the Origin of Species was published.

E-Cigarettes Found to Have 10 times More Cancer Causing


E-Cigarettes Found to Have 10 times More Cancer Causing Ingredients than Regular Cigarettes
New research has found electronic cigarettes to contain even 10 times more cancer causing ingredients than the tobacco products they are supposed to save us from.

E-cigarettes are meant to replace a dangerous and life destroying habit, but they turned out to be far more dangerous. But why wasn’t there any research prior to their approval and production – a research that was supposed to prove their safety and viability? And who was responsible for that?

Here is an excerpt from the FDA website, and nowhere on its website does the FDA mention an increased cancer risk. The discussion is mostly regarding standardization or quality control.

FDA: E-Cigarettes: Questions and Answers

Q: What are electronic cigarettes?

A: Electronic cigarettes are products designed to deliver nicotine or other substances to a user in the form of a vapor. Typically, they are composed of a rechargeable, battery-operated heating element, a replaceable cartridge that may contain nicotine or other chemicals, and an atomizer that, when heated, converts the contents of the cartridge into a vapor. This vapor can then be inhaled by the user. These products are often made to look like such products as cigarettes, cigars, and pipes. They are also sometimes made to look like everyday items such as pens and USB memory sticks, for people who wish to use the product without others noticing.

Q: What concerns does FDA have regarding electronic cigarettes?

A: FDA has not evaluated any e-cigarettes for safety or effectiveness.

And there you have it.

Now we learn about this shocking information from sources outside the US. The FDA has a budget of over $4,500,000,000 (4.5 billion) and a track record of corruption and failures. Once again, it turns out that the FDA is a huge waste of taxpayers’ money.

E-cigarettes are being used by hundreds of thousands of underage children and millions of adults with the hope that they are a safer alternative to tobacco products. However, it seems that nothing could possibly be further from the truth. Now we have research, but not from the CDC/FDA – the institutes who we depend on and fund massively to keep us safe and healthy.

There’s no wonder that the cancer rate continues to increase.

E-CIGS HAVE 10 TIMES MORE CANCER CAUSING INGREDIENTS THAN REGULAR CIGARETTES

According to research conducted by Japanese scientists, e-cigarettes contain 10 times the level of cancer-causing carcinogens than regular cigarettes. Until recently, e-cigarettes were recommended as the answer to smoking without the complication of so many dangers.

These electronic nicotine products became hugely popular because people believed that they were receiving a hit of nicotine without the need to worry about any health damage that’s caused by a normal cigarette, loaded with chemicals.

But when the Japanese Ministry of Health commissioned a research, they found formaldehyde and acetaldehyde carcinogens in the liquid produced by many e-cigarette products, stated a health ministry official.

The group also found that e-cigarettes can fuel potentially life-threatening drug-resistant pathogens. This discovery comes from a lab study that tested the vapor from e-cigarettes on live methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and human cells.

According to the official, the formaldehyde carcinogen is much more present in the e-cigarette liquids than in the chemicals used in regular cigarettes.

The researcher Naoki Kunugita said: “In one brand of e-cigarette the team found more than 10 times the level of carcinogens contained in one regular cigarette. Especially when the wire (which vaporizes the liquid) gets overheated, higher amounts of those harmful substances seemed to be produced.”

Kunugita also added that the levels of the formaldehyde carcinogen varied in the final results.

“You call them e-cigarettes, but they are products totally different from regular tobacco. The government is now studying the possible risks associated with them, with view to looking at how they should be regulated,” the Japanese health ministry official said.

Earlier in 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) advised governments to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to underage people because they posed a serious threat to them.

The UN health agency said that although there’s a lack of evidence regarding the damage caused by e-cigarettes, there was still enough evidence “to caution children and adolescents, pregnant women, and women of reproductive age” about their use. They also added that e-cigs should be outlawed from indoor public spaces.

The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated: “More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research. This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.”

E-cigarettes around 95% less harmful than tobacco estimates landmark review


Expert independent review concludes that e-cigarettes have potential to help smokers quit.

An expert independent evidence review published today by Public Health England (PHE) concludes that e-cigarettes are significantly less harmful to health than tobacco and have the potential to help smokers quit smoking.

e-cigarettes

Key findings of the review include:

  • the current best estimate is that e-cigarettes are around 95% less harmful than smoking
  • nearly half the population (44.8%) don’t realise e-cigarettes are much less harmful than smoking
  • there is no evidence so far that e-cigarettes are acting as a route into smoking for children or non-smokers

The review, commissioned by PHE and led by Professor Ann McNeill (King’s College London) and Professor Peter Hajek (Queen Mary University of London), suggests that e-cigarettes may be contributing to falling smoking rates among adults and young people. Following the review PHE has published a paper on the implications of the evidence for policy and practice.

The comprehensive review of the evidence finds that almost all of the 2.6 million adults using e-cigarettes in Great Britain are current or ex-smokers, most of whom are using the devices to help them quit smoking or to prevent them going back to cigarettes. It also provides reassurance that very few adults and young people who have never smoked are becoming regular e-cigarette users (less than 1% in each group).

However, the review raises concerns that increasing numbers of people think e-cigarettes are equally or more harmful than smoking (22.1% in 2015, up from 8.1% in 2013: ASH Smokefree GB survey) or don’t know (22.7% in 2015, ASH Smokefree GB survey).

Despite this trend all current evidence finds that e-cigarettes carry a fraction of the risk of smoking.

Emerging evidence suggests some of the highest successful quit rates are now seen among smokers who use an e-cigarette and also receive additional support from their local stop smoking services.

Professor Kevin Fenton, Director of Health and Wellbeing at Public Health England said:

Smoking remains England’s number one killer and the best thing a smoker can do is to quit completely, now and forever.

E-cigarettes are not completely risk free but when compared to smoking, evidence shows they carry just a fraction of the harm. The problem is people increasingly think they are at least as harmful and this may be keeping millions of smokers from quitting. Local stop smoking services should look to support e-cigarette users in their journey to quitting completely.

Professor Ann McNeill, King’s College London and independent author of the review, said:

There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are undermining England’s falling smoking rates. Instead the evidence consistently finds that e-cigarettes are another tool for stopping smoking and in my view smokers should try vaping and vapers should stop smoking entirely.

E-cigarettes could be a game changer in public health in particular by reducing the enormous health inequalities caused by smoking.

Professor Peter Hajek, Queen Mary University London and independent author of the review said:

My reading of the evidence is that smokers who switch to vaping remove almost all the risks smoking poses to their health. Smokers differ in their needs and I would advise them not to give up on e-cigarettes if they do not like the first one they try. It may take some experimentation with different products and e-liquids to find the right one.

Professor Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s expert in cancer prevention, said:

Fears that e-cigarettes have made smoking seem normal again or even led to people taking up tobacco smoking are not so far being realised based on the evidence assessed by this important independent review. In fact, the overall evidence points to e-cigarettes actually helping people to give up smoking tobacco.

Free Stop Smoking Services remain the most effective way for people to quit but we recognise the potential benefits for e-cigarettes in helping large numbers of people move away from tobacco.

Cancer Research UK is funding more research to deal with the unanswered questions around these products including the longer-term impact.

Lisa Surtees, acting director at Fresh Smoke Free North East, the first region where all local stop smoking services are actively promoted as e-cigarette friendly, said:

Despite making great strides to reduce smoking, tobacco is still our biggest killer. Our region has always kept an open mind towards using electronic cigarettes as we can see the massive potential health benefits from switching.

All of our local NHS Stop Smoking Services now proactively welcome anyone who wants to use these devices as part of their quit attempt and increase their chance of success.