Guys Share Why They’re Self-Conscious About Their Hair.


Women often complain they have it harder than men when it comes to appearance-related social pressure and its impact on self-confidence. However, men struggle with body image issues too –they’re just not as open about it. Unless they’re on a secret-sharing app like Whisper, where men recently shared why they feel self-conscious of their hair.

Appearance: Guys Share Why They're Self-Conscious About Their Hair

Even if you’re super confident, it’s normal to feel a little insecure or awkward at one point or another (unless you’re Channing Tatum and you can go full Beyonce without an ounce of self-consciousness). And the fact that a lot of men feel self-conscious about their mane makes sense: Whether you’re rocking aman bun or a buzz cut, your hair is an integral part of your style. It’s the first thing you notice when you look in the mirror and it’s the one aspect of your appearance that you might invest more time and money in maintaining.

You might feel like your locks are getting harder to style. Your girlfriend might complain that it’s taking you too long to get ready or even poke fun at your receding hairline. You might laugh it off but feel a little bad inside. Well, you’re not the only one.

From worrying about hair loss to going gray, here are the thoughts men have about their hair but are too embarrassed to share. So stop fretting, rock your hairstyle with pride (even if you have crazy curls some women would kill for) and find comfort in the following confessions.

5 Tibetan Exercises You Should Be Doing Everyday To Stay Youthful & Energized


http://www.healthyveganstyle.com/5-tibetan-exercises-you-should-be-doing-everyday-to-stay-youthful-energized/

7 Warning Signs Your Hormones Are Out of Balance! How To Reset Them Naturally?


The hormones have key capacities in your body, and in case one of them “gets out of line” the others will as well, bringing about hormone imbalance. Hormones work as chemical messengers in our body. We go through hormonal changes from birth to death. They cause changes in our bodies over time including:

-Reproduction
-Growth & Development
-Metabolism
-Mood
-Sexual Function

image

What do your Hormones do?

Your hormones are tiny little chemical messengers that whizz around your bloodstream telling your organs and body tissues to fulfill their functions.

Warning Signs Your Hormones Are Out of Balance

Insomnia

If you are suffering from insomnia and having difficulty sleeping it can be a sign of hormonal imbalance. Try to optimize your sleep and take antioxidants. Make sure to include quality lean protein, especially at dinner.

Constant Fatigue and Weakness

Fatigue is a common symptom of a hormonal imbalance, especially in menopausal and postmenopausal women. Cortisol, a hormone produced in the adrenal glands during times of stress, is often a contributor to fatigue.

Excessive Sweating

If you are have night sweats and hot flashes it can be due to hormonal imbalance. Write down your routine, what you eat and drink, how you feel, and what kind of emotions cause your temperature to rise.

Depression

Feeling depressed and rejected is a sign of hormonal imbalance. If not clinically caused it can mean you’re not feeding your body what it needs. Listen to your inner self and treat your body in a good way with a healthy diet, exercise and proper nutrients.

Hair Loss

While more common among men, hair loss is also a common premenopausal, pregnancy and post-pregnancy symptom in women. According to the American Hair Loss Association, testosterone (a male hormone present in women in trace quantities) converts to its derivative hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by interacting with an enzyme found in hair follicles.

Dry Eyes

Dry eye syndrome occurs when your eyes do not produce enough tears for adequate moisturization, or when the tear film’s substituents are out of balance. It is uncomfortable and often painful and can be due to a hormonal imbalance in the body. Hormones help regulate eye function and directly affect eye health.

Poor Libido

Having a poor libido can also be one of the signs you have a hormone imbalance. The hormonal Androgen is manufactured in men by their testicles, and in women by their ovaries. Lack of this hormone can give rise to poor libido, even in women.

8 Natural Ways to Reset Imbalance Hormones

-Eat Coconut Oil and Avocados
-Supplement with Adaptogen Herbs
-Balance Omega-3/6 Ratio
-Heal Leaky Gut
-Eliminate Toxic Kitchen and Body Care Products
-Get More Sleep
-Limit Caffeine
-Back Off Birth Control Pills

Top three scientifically researched herbs to control blood sugar


Image: Top three scientifically researched herbs to control blood sugar

Though drugs are supposed to be your only option – according to conventional wisdom – to help cure certain illnesses while keeping others under control, they aren’t without side effects. As far as blood sugar medication for diabetics, this can include problems such as liver failure.

To combat this, many are turning toward natural remedies for blood sugar control, concocted from herbs instead of chemicals. While not all purported blood sugar control herbs are legitimate, there are three that show a lot of promise.

American Ginseng

In 2000, the American Diabetic Association announced support for ginseng based on clinical trials performed by the University of Toronto. In it, participants continued to adhere to strict diets, regular exercise and medication.

The 23 participants were then given either three grams of American ginseng or a placebo for eight weeks. By the end, the diabetic patients on American ginseng showed lower blood sugar levels.

Fenugreek Seeds

Fenugreek seeds have long been a folk remedy for diabetes, prompting study by scientists. Placebo controlled studies suggest that Fenugreek seeds low blood sugar considerably.

Sage

Long used in recipes, it is more commonly used as a way to treat cramps. That being said, a German study found that diabetics that drank infusions of sage with nothing in their stomachs showed reduced blood sugar levels. Even so, it is still an herb that needs a bit more testing before any truly accurate results can be released.

Zika Outbreak Epicenter In Same Area Genetically-Modified Mosquitoes Released In 2015


The World Health Organization announced it will convene an Emergency Committee under International Health Regulations on Monday, February 1, concerning the Zika virus ‘explosive’ spread throughout the Americas. The virus reportedly has the potential to reach pandemic proportions — possibly around the globe. But understandingwhy this outbreak happened is vital to curbing it. As the WHO statement said:

“A causal relationship between Zika virus infection and birth malformations and neurological syndromes … is strongly suspected. [These links] have rapidly changed the risk profile of Zika, from a mild threat to one of alarming proportions.

 

“WHO is deeply concerned about this rapidly evolving situation for 4 main reasons: the possible association of infection with birth malformations and neurological syndromes; the potential for further international spread given the wide geographical distribution of the mosquito vector; the lack of population immunity in newly affected areas; and the absence of vaccines, specific treatments, and rapid diagnostic tests […]

 

“The level of concern is high, as is the level of uncertainty.”

Zika seemingly exploded out of nowhere. Though it was first discovered in 1947, cases only sporadically occurred throughout Africa and southern Asia. In 2007, the first case was reported in the Pacific. In 2013, a smattering of small outbreaks and individual cases were officially documented in Africa and the western Pacific. They also began showing up in the Americas. In May 2015, Brazil reported its first case of Zika virus — and the situation changed dramatically.

Brazil is now considered the epicenter of the Zika outbreak, which coincides with at least 4,000 reports of babies born with microcephaly just since October.

zika-microcephaly

When examining a rapidly expanding potential pandemic, it’s necessary to leave no stone unturned so possible solutions, as well as future prevention, will be as effective as possible. In that vein, there was another significant development in 2015.

Oxitec first unveiled its large-scale, genetically-modified mosquito farm in Brazil in July 2012,with the goal of reducing “the incidence of dengue fever,” as The Disease Daily reported. Dengue fever is spread by the same Aedes mosquitoes which spread the Zika virus — and though they “cannot fly more than 400 meters,” WHO stated, “it may inadvertently be transported by humans from one place to another.” By July 2015, shortly after the GM mosquitoes were first released into the wild in Juazeiro, Brazil, Oxitec proudly announced they had “successfully controlled the Aedes aegypti mosquito that spreads dengue fever, chikungunya and zika virus, by reducing the target population by more than 90%.”

Though that might sound like an astounding success — and, arguably, it was — there is an alarming possibility to consider.

Nature, as one Redditor keenly pointed out, finds a way — and the effort to control dengue, zika, and other viruses, appears to have backfired dramatically.

zika

Juazeiro, Brazil — the location where genetically-modified mosquitoes were first released into the wild.

zika

Map showing the concentration of suspected Zika-related cases of microcephaly in Brazil.

The particular strain of Oxitec GM mosquitoes, OX513A, are genetically altered so the vast majority of their offspring will die before they mature — though Dr. Ricarda Steinbrecher published concerns in areport in September 2010 that a known survival rate of 3-4 percent warranted further study before the release of the GM insects. Her concerns, which were echoed by several other scientists both at the time and since, appear to have been ignored — though they should not have been.

Those genetically-modified mosquitoes work to control wild, potentially disease-carrying populations in a very specific manner. Only the male modified Aedes mosquitoes are supposed to be released into the wild — as they will mate with their unaltered female counterparts. Once offspring are produced, the modified, scientific facet is supposed to ‘kick in’ and kill that larvae before it reaches breeding age — if tetracycline is not present during its development. But there is a problem.

zika-mosquito

Aedes aegypti mosquito. Image credit:Muhammad Mahdi Karim

According to an unclassified document from the Trade and Agriculture Directorate Committee for Agriculture dated February 2015, Brazil is the third largest in “global antimicrobial consumption in food animal production” — meaning, Brazil is third in the world for its use of tetracycline in its food animals. As a study by the American Society of Agronomy, et. al., explained,“It is estimated that approximately 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in waste.” One of the antibiotics (or antimicrobials) specifically named in that report for its environmental persistence is tetracycline.

In fact, as a confidential internal Oxitec document divulged in 2012, that survival rate could be as high as 15% — even with low levels of tetracycline present. “Even small amounts of tetracycline can repress” the engineered lethality. Indeed, that 15% survival rate was described by Oxitec:

“After a lot of testing and comparing experimental design, it was found that [researchers] had used a cat food to feed the [OX513A] larvae and this cat food contained chicken. It is known that tetracycline is routinely used to prevent infections in chickens, especially in the cheap, mass produced, chicken used for animal food. The chicken is heat-treated before being used, but this does not remove all the tetracycline. This meant that a small amount of tetracycline was being added from the food to the larvae and repressing the [designed] lethal system.”

 

Even absent this tetracycline, as Steinbrecher explained, a “sub-population” of genetically-modified Aedes mosquitoes could theoretically develop and thrive, in theory, “capable of surviving and flourishing despite any further” releases of ‘pure’ GM mosquitoes which still have that gene intact. She added, “the effectiveness of the system also depends on the [genetically-designed] late onset of the lethality. If the time of onset is altered due to environmental conditions … then a 3-4% [survival rate] represents a much bigger problem…”

 

As the WHO stated in its press release, “conditions associated with this year’s El Nino weather pattern are expected to increase mosquito populations greatly in many areas.”

Incidentally, President Obama called for a massive research effort to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus, as one does not currently exist. Brazil has now called in 200,000 soldiers to somehow help combat the virus’ spread. Aedes mosquitoes have reportedly been spotted in the U.K. But perhaps the most ironic — or not — proposition was proffered on January 19, by the MIT Technology Review:

“An outbreak in the Western Hemisphere could give countries including the United States new reasons to try wiping out mosquitoes with genetic engineering.

 

“Yesterday, the Brazilian city of Piracicaba said it would expand the use of genetically modified mosquitoes …

 

“The GM mosquitoes were created by Oxitec, a British company recently purchased by Intrexon, a synthetic biology company based in Maryland. The company said it has released bugs in parts of Brazil and the Cayman Islands to battle dengue fever.”

How can the world fight Zika – silent menace that threatens the unborn? | World news


Many of the world’s leading health experts will gather for an emergency meeting in Geneva on Monday to debate a single critical issue: does the outbreak of Zika virus disease in South and Central America represent an international health crisis?

Recife health workers

Most scientists and doctors concerned with the outbreak – linked to an alarming rise in cases of a foetal deformation called microcephaly – believe the answer is an undoubted yes. The terrible effects of Zika threaten much of the planet, they believe.

“This outbreak meets all the criteria of a public health emergency,” said Jeremy Farrar, head of the Wellcome Trust. “It not only crosses national borders but is affecting a whole region. We need to be prepared for this disease to start spreading and help countries across the world by preparing them for its arrival.

“The Ebola outbreak which took more than 11,000 lives in west Africa between 2014 and 2015 was terrible. However, this outbreak is in many ways worse, for we have got this silent infection which – in a group of highly vulnerable individuals, pregnant women – is associated with a horrible outcome for their babies.”

There are several problems facing health experts. For a start, there is no vaccine and no immediate prospect of one. “Trying to develop a vaccine which would have to be tested on pregnant women is a practical and ethical nightmare,” said Mike Turner, head of infection and immunobiology at the Wellcome Trust.

In addition, at least 80% of those infected with the virus show no symptoms. Tracking the disease, therefore, becomes very difficult. Finally, there is the nature of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito species that spreads Zika (and other diseases such as dengue and yellow fevers).

“This mosquito thrives on 21st-century conditions,” said Farrar. “It loves urban life and has spread across the entire tropical belt of the planet, and, of course, that belt is expanding as global warming takes effect.” In fact, only two nations, Chile and Canada, in the whole of the Americas are free of Aedes aegypti and both essentially cold countries are likely to be the only ones that escape a Zika outbreak.

The World Health Organisation says as many as four million clinical cases of Zika could affect the Americas. Other experts suspect the figure will be higher. “Four million clinical cases may sound a lot but it may well be an underestimate,” said Professor Paul Reiter, a consultant on mosquito-borne diseases at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. This view is backed by virologist Jonathan Ball, professor of molecular virology at Nottingham University. “The numbers likely to be infected by Zika in the Americas outbreak are immense,” he said. “The virus has been unleashed in an area where its insect vector is widespread and the human population has never been exposed to it in the past. They don’t have any immunity and so the mosquito can pass the virus from person to person unhindered.”

The spread of Zika raises other questions. How did it get into the region and what turned a virus that was rated harmless and unworthy of medical attention a year ago into one that has such a grim impact on the unborn?

Most experts believe the virus was brought into the region by infected but symptomless carriers. “One suggestion is that a few of the thousands of fans who gathered for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil were Zika virus carriers,” said Paul Kellam, head of virus genomics at the Sanger Institute in Cambridge. “They were then bitten by the mosquito Aedes aegypti which, of course, is widespread through the Americas. Those mosquitoes then bit other individuals and so a pool of infected people was created.”

The question of how the disease began to produce its grim foetal side-effects is harder to answer. “The Zika virus was originally found among people in the Zika area of Uganda just after the second world war,” said Myles Druckman, International SOS’s regional medical director for the Americas. “It spread to south-east Asia and then to some of the Pacific islands. Most of those infected displayed no symptoms while a few suffered fever, painful joints and sometimes a rash.”

A baby in Brazil born with microcephaly

It was only when Zika reached Brazil that it was linked to microcephaly. “The Zika virus began to show itself in numbers of infected by spring last year,” said Druckman. “Then, by September, health officials noticed that numbers of cases of microcephaly had also begun to rise dramatically. There should have been about 200 cases. In the end, doctors counted more then 4,000 and have linked most of these to Zika.”

Microcephaly is a condition in which babies are born with small, deformed heads. Those affected can suffer convulsions, seizures and neurological defect. It had never been associated with Zika before the virus reached Brazil, which suggests that some time in the recent past either Zika changed biologically or there was some alteration in the behaviour of Aedes aegypti. Most suspect the virus must have mutated so that it produces this dreadful symptom, though this interpretation will take some time to confirm.

Aedes aegypti

In the short term, researchers agree that the Zika outbreak will peak at some point. “It is likely to burn itself out as people become exposed then immune,” said Ball. “But it is unlikely to disappear completely. In future it will probably survive by causing sporadic outbreaks and by infecting people who haven’t been exposed to the virus, for example children.”

However, it is the prospect of this new version of Zika disease continuing to spread round the world that worries scientists such as Turner. “One positive aspect of this outbreak is that it has centred on a country that has a well-funded health service. What really concerns me is the threat of it returning to Africa in its new form. It could have a devastating impact then.”

So what can be done to halt its spread? In the short term, controlling vector numbers is considered to be paramount by experts. Many approaches are being tested. For example, Brazil is involved in international trials of genetically modified mosquitoes developed by the British company Oxitec. These mosquitoes – males – are genetically engineered to cause the death of their offspring once they have mated with virus-carrying females. In trials in the south-eastern city of Piracicaba, the mosquito population fell by 90%, researchers have reported.

The technique sounds promising. However, Turner counselled caution. “Attacking the mosquito is a good idea but we have been attacking mosquitoes for decades now and they are still a major problem. And, yes, GM mosquitoes are under trial in several countries including Brazil but they are not yet ready for mass distribution. It is an open question if we can scale it up to the level we need in the near future.” In fact, health officials may be forced to return to older, more controversial techniques to control Aedes aegypti, including mass spraying withDDT, said Turner.

Such a move would be contentious. DDT is a highly effective insecticide but its use in the 1950s and 60s was linked to rises in cancer in humans and deaths of wildlife, particularly birds. Its use is now banned in many parts of the world.

“We would not normally back the idea of using DDT but we are in a situation where there has to be a trade-off,” said Turner. “We have to balance the risk posed to the environment with the terrible impact this virus is having on the unborn. We should be thinking about the ethics and practicalities of this now.”

This point was backed by Farrar. “Nothing should be off the table when discussing what to do about Zika because we cannot predict where this epidemic is going. We are in a dreadful situation in many ways.”

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6 Nutrient Deficiencies that Can Cause Depression & Mood Disorders


Did you know simply nutrient deficiencies can drastically increase your chances of having depression and other mood disorders? Nutrient-related disorders are always treatable and deficiencies are usually curable.

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The good news is that there are ways to confront these deficiencies. You can work with an integrative health physician to determine where your nutrition levels are and how you can counteract the associated effects.

6 Nutrient Deficiencies that Can Cause Depression & Mood Disorders

Vitamin B6

A deficiency of vitamin B6 can also lead to depression and other cognitive disorders. This nutrient is required for creating neurotransmitters and brain chemicals that influence your mood. It even helps keep the nervous system healthy. Furthermore, vitamin B6 helps the body absorb vitamin B12, the deficiency of which is also linked to depression.

Vitamin D

This deficiency has been linked to depression, dementia, and autism. Most of our levels drop off during the fall and winter months, since the sunlight is the richest source. An adequate level of serotonin helps prevent and treat mild depression. In addition, vitamin D is important for the immune system and bone health.

Amino Acids

Amino acids are the special building blocks of protein, some of which gets transformed in our bodies into neurotransmitters. Without adequate amino acids, your brain can’t work and you get sluggish, foggy, unfocused, and depressed. Amino acids are found in meat, eggs, fish, beans, seeds, and nuts.

Magnesium

Magnesium is another important nutrient, the deficiency of which can lead to depression. It helps activate enzymes needed for serotonin and dopamine production. It also influences several systems associated with development of depression. In addition, it keeps your bones healthy, reduces anxiety and lowers blood pressure, to name a few.

Zinc

Zinc is used by more enzymes (and we have over 300) than any other mineral. It is crucial to many of our systems. It activates our digestive enzymes so that we can break down our food and works to prevent food allergies (which, in turn, averts depression, since some of our mood disruptions are triggered by food allergies). It also helps our DNA to repair and produce proteins. Finally, zinc helps control inflammation and boosts our immune system.

Selenium

Selenium is also essential to brain functioning and helps improve mood and depressive symptoms. Moreover, selenium plays an important role in proper thyroid functioning. A healthy thyroid is important for mental health.

Is Zika Virus the Next Tool For Forced Sterilization, Vaccination and Depopulation?


zika

There is a new pathogen getting lots of attention from the mass media and the rest of the control system, and those awakened to the globalist plans may want to pay very close attention. It isn’t quite the Ebola-style scare, but it brings with it a much more focused and sinister agenda, and it’s already underway in 2016. It’s called the Zika virus scare.

In perfect timing with the current attempted rise of the new world order we’ve been witnessing over the past several months, the Zika virus scare agenda is focused on fulfilling the global elite’s depopulation agenda as we’ll see in a minute. But first let’s consider some of the history of the depopulation agenda itself.

The global elite have been clear about their goals of depopulation. Depopulation is deeply embedded into all the global plans of the new world order. It’s all part of the Malthusian belief or theory that the earth only has limited resources and, therefore, it is up to humanity (or its ruling elite) to limit its growth. The ruling elite have been selling this ideology for decades.

In 1958, author of Brave New World Aldous Huxley appeared on a national TV interview with Mike Wallace about his gloomy view of humanity. In his interview he admits at the time that humanity is being manipulated and destroyed by many forces. Huxley almost sounds like a prophet or a wise messenger for humanity with his unique smart-sounding, slow-speaking technique. But it doesn’t take a wizard to listen in to the first 3 minutes to see that Huxley’s TV appearance ultimately is about selling the Malthusian dogma of scarcity and the need for depopulation as a solution. Huxley cleverly ties “less freedom” with “overpopulation” due to scarcity of resources thus painting “depopulation” with the same virtuous brush you would paint things like “freedom”, “liberty” or “justice” with.

Depopulation is also clearly outlined in the Georgia Guidestones, a monument (by the way) whose history is fully protected by the establishment media and Wikipedia. In case you didn’t know, the identity of the person who actually paid for the monument to this day is concealed. Wikipedia states:

In June 1979, an unknown person or persons under the pseudonym R. C. Christian hired Elberton Granite Finishing Company to build the structure.

Wikipedia also states:

The structure is sometimes referred to as an “American Stonehenge”

So let’s get this straight. It’s an American “Stonehenge” of historic proportion, it was built in modern times, yet mysteriously no one knows who paid for it?? Let that sink in for a minute.

I bring up the Georgia Guidestones because not only is it a listing of ten commandments for the new world order, but the first two commandments have clear implications of the goals of depopulation. The first two commandments state:

1- Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.

2- Guide reproduction wisely— improving fitness and diversity.

Clearly the Luciferian elites who paid for these stones believe the Malthusian theory of population, and they feel population needs to be controlled. The second commandment demonstrates that controlling population is clearly something they feel needs to be done by controlling fertility and reproduction. Despite this outrage, there isn’t any criticism of this idea in Wikipedia or any establishment platform. Instead these ideas are seemingly accepted.

There is no greater control of humanity than taking control of someone’s body and their reproductive rights; and with the globalists going for it all in 2016, no one should be surprised that an effect that wasn’t traditionally there before is being attached to a virus that has been around potentially hundreds if not thousands of years.

Enter the coming Zika virus scare of 2016. The virus was first described in 1952 as a virus that causes mild symptoms that pose no real threat to humanity; that has been the story … until now that is. The establishment medical authorities are now saying that Zika virus is directly responsible for over 3000 cases of in utero (in the womb) cases of microcephaly in Brazil alone. Microcephaly is when a newborn is born with a small-sized head and it is often associated with other brain abnormalities.

This is where the story gets a little stranger. And this is where independent researchers are beginning to ask questions that could potentially expose the entire Zika virus scare as a nefarious staged agenda to stop or even force women to become sterilized in the name of stopping this “epidemic”.

Questions researchers are asking are questions like – why is the virus now being linked to microcephaly when it never was before? And, why is this explosion of microcephaly coinciding with regions of the earth (Brazil, Mexico) that have a high incidence of a disease known asphenylketonuria, which is a genetic disease where the patient has a missing enzyme that doesn’t allow them to break down an amino acid called phenylalanine. This is significant because phenylketonuria is well known to cause microcephaly not Zika virus. This is significant if not disturbing because we are being told that Brazilian medical authorities are claiming the link between the virus and microcephaly without any real scientific and medical evidence to rule out other much more common causes of microcephaly.

We should be asking questions like what if the microcephaly is being caused by something other than the Zika virus which has always been a mild virus? And, how can a virus change its infectious behavior suddenly without any other cause to explain the change? And, what if the vaccines the pregnant women are being given are chemically causing the microcephaly? How about, where is the direct evidence claimed by medical authorities that the virus is the cause?

The fact is that viruses generally don’t suddenly cause things they never caused before. And more than ever we should be vigilant and knowledgeable about these things because whether you are ready or not, the mainstream media hype and scare has already begun. The latest CNN psyop Zika virus commercial attempts to link microcephaly to Zika virus without any actual facts or science. Strikingly, the “solution” is presented as “delay getting pregnant”! And according to the World Health Organization (WHO) the Zika virus (like ISIS) is coming to your town soon, so you better be ready.

With the Olympics planned in Brazil this year, we should at least be paying attention to see how the establishment tries to spin this in terms of a global pandemic that must be dealt with by forced sterilization, forced vaccination or both. Either way it will likely be something out of the Aldous Huxley or Bill Gates new world order playbook to promote depopulation.

If nothing else, it’s about time we stop thinking that these global crises that all fit in perfectly with the new world order plans are by coincidence. And it’s time to take notice of how all the huge crises that are presented by the mass media, all seem to fit into the new world order plans in a very neat and increasingly perfect way. In light of the overall picture, we would be foolish to ignore these patterns.

Mothers can pass on depression to their daughters.


HIGHLIGHTS

• It is the first evidence that the brain area linked to depression is hereditary. A study of 35 families looked at the structure of the brain circuitry known as the corticolimbic system.
• The research shows the part of the brain which controls our feelings is more likely to be passed down from mothers to female offspring than to sons -or from fathers to children of either gender.

Don't leave depression in your will (Getty Images)

Don’t leave depression in your will.
Research suggests that with mothers passing their emotions down to their daughters, depression can be inherited. The research shows the part of the brain which controls our feelings is more likely to be passed down from mothers to female offspring than to sons -or from fathers to children of either gender.

It is the first evidence that the brain area linked to depression is hereditary. A study of 35 families looked at the structure of the brain circuitry known as the corticolimbic system. The corticolimbic system governs emotional regulation and processing and plays a role in mood disorders, including depression. Previous research indicates a strong link in depression between mothers and daughters, while many previous animal studies have shown that female offspring are more likely than males to show changes in emotion-associated brain structures in response to maternal pre-natal stress.

Dr Hoeft said, “Many factors play a role in depression -genes that are not inherited from the mother, social environment, and life experiences, to name only three.Mother-daughter transmission is just one piece of it. But this is the first study to bridge animal and human clinical research and show a possible matrilineal transmission of human corticolimbic circuitry, which has been implicated in depression, by scanning both parents and offspring. It opens the door to a whole new avenue of research looking at intergenerational trans mission patterns in the human brain.”

The association between mothers’ and daughters’ corticolimbic GMV was significantly greater than that between mothers and sons, fathers and sons, and fathers and daughters. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, is the first to use MRI in both parents and their children to study inter-generational transmission of the pattern of brain structures. Dr Hoeft said, “This gives us a potential new tool to better understand depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions, as most conditions seem to show intergenerational transmission patterns. Anxiety, autism, addition, schizophrenia, dyslexia, you name it -brain patterns inherited from both mothers and fathers have an impact on just about all of them.”