Aluminum in Deodorants Can Cause Breast Cancer – Use This to Eliminate Body Odor!


Sweating is a natural process that protects the body from overheating, such as during hot and humid weather or intensive physical work.  Excess thermal energy is evaporated through the sweat particles  which contributes to the cooling of the body.

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The human body has a large number of sweat glands, but most of us are annoyed with armpit sweat. The armpits contain the most active sweat glands, thus they emit sweat frequently.  This sweat is enriched with fatty acids and proteins which leave their residue on clothes.

Sweating is an important function of our body. Excessive sweating is called hyperhidrosis. When sweat starts to smell it becomes annoying and inconvenient, so we begin to actively use deodorants and antiperspirants. Well, getting rid of armpit sweat altogether is not what you should be worrying about. Sweat is good; it contains chemicals that fight diseases.

According to a recent study, the chemicals found in sweat contain natural antibiotics that can kill dangerous germs. So, getting rid of one of the most important functions of the body, would not be wise. However, you can get rid of the smell that comes with sweaty armpits with proven methods from folk medicine.

Aluminum in Deodorants Can Cause Breast Cancer. Use Lime to Eliminate Body Odor

Believe it or not, the results it gives are just fantastic. Just cut the lime in half (not very ripe), and then wipe each of the halves on each armpit. It is possible that after rubbing lime, the skin under the arms will brighten a little, but don’t worry,  the color of the skin will be restored soon after.

Lime’s ability to combat armpit sweat is due to its acidity.  The acid in the lime juice helps reduce sweat production and can work as a natural deodorant. Additionally,  limes have strong antibacterial properties (bacteria is what we smell).

Remember, armpits are supposed to perspire; they get rid of toxins in your body. However, you can get rid of the body odor; just use limes.

New test uses a single drop of blood to reveal entire history of viral infections .


Cheap and rapid test allows doctors to access list of every virus that has infected or continues to infect a patient, and could transform disease detection
The new test uses a single drop of blood, and draws on advances in synthetic biology and rapid gene sequencing to analyse more than 1000 strains of virus.
The new test uses a single drop of blood, and draws on advances in synthetic biology and rapid gene sequencing to analyse more than 1000 strains of virus.


Researchers have developed a cheap and rapid test that reveals a person’s full history of viral infections from a single drop of blood.

The test allows doctors to read out a list of the viruses that have infected, or continue to infect, patients even when they have not caused any obvious symptoms.

The technology means that GPs could screen patients for all of the viruses capable of infecting people. It could transform the detection of serious infections such as hepatitis C and HIV, which people can carry for years without knowing.

“Normally, when a doctor wants to know if someone’s been infected with a virus, they have to guess what the virus is, and then look specifically for that virus,” said Stephen Elledge, who led the project at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“This could lead to a diagnostic where people go annually to their doctor and get their viral history recorded. It could certainly discover viral infections that are serious and that a patient didn’t know they had,” he said.

The $25 (£16) test draws on advances in synthetic biology and rapid gene sequencing to analyse more than 1000 strains of human viruses in one pass. Until now, most tests have looked for only a single virus at a time. Elledge estimates that the latest test, called VirScan, can process 100 samples in two to three days.

The test exploits the fact that the immune system makes antibodies to fight viruses whenever the body becomes infected. These antibodies can live on in the bloodstream for years and even decades.

To develop the test, Elledge engineered batches of harmless viruses to carry bits of proteins from human viruses on their surfaces. In total, they carried proteins from more than 1000 strains of the 206 kinds of viruses known to infect people. Antibodies use these protein fragments to recognise invading viruses and launch their attacks.

 

When a droplet of blood from a patient is mixed with the modified viruses, any antibodies they have latch on to human virus proteins they recognise as invaders. The scientists then pull out the antibodies and identify the human viruses from the protein fragments they have stuck to.

“It’s the first time we’ve been able to look in a completely unbiased manner at what viruses are infecting people, and we can do it for all known viruses,” said Elledge. The test picks up the antibodies a person produces from vaccinations, but these can be discarded from the test results. Details are reported in the journal Science.

In a demonstration of the technology, the team analysed blood from 569 people in the US, South Africa, Thailand and Peru. The test found that, on average, people had been infected with 10 species of viruses, though at least two people in the trial had histories of 84 infections from different kinds of viruses.

The most common infections were herpes viruses, which cause cold sores, enteroviruses that upset stomaches, influenza, and rhinoviruses that trigger common colds. Those in the US had experienced fewer infections than those in the other countries, and as expected, older people had richer viral histories than youngsters.

The test could bring about major benefits for organ transplant patients. One problem that can follow transplant surgery is the unexpected reawakening of viruses that have lurked inactive in the patient or donor for years. These viruses can return in force when the patient’s immune system is suppressed with drugs to prevent them rejecting the organ. Standard tests often fail to pick up latent viruses before surgery, but the VirScan procedure could reveal their presence and alert doctors and patients to the danger.

“This could be very valuable,” said Iwijn De Vlaminck, a biomedical engineer at Cornell University in New York, who was not involved in the study. “What this allows you to do is look into the past and measure a person’s exposure to previous infections. That has important advantages, because you can detect these infections that go to latency. You could screen blood from patients and organ donors in this very broad manner and predict potential future issues with viral reactivation.”

Scientists believe the test will also cast light on how certain viral infections can predispose people to seemingly unrelated diseases later in life. Some infections can cause permanent damage to body tissues, or alter the immune system, in ways that leave people more at risk of medical problems when they are older. For example, infection with Epstein-Barr virus can raise the risk of cancer. But how other viruses affect long term health is far murkier. “That kind of analysis is something this really makes possible,” said Elledge.

Chinese student can control a cyborg cockroach with his own mind .


  • Cockroach is fitted with an electronic ‘backpack’ to stimulate its antennae
  • Backpack’s controlled by an electroencephalography (EEG) headset
  • Brainwaves read by it used to direct the cockroach in a certain direction
  • Innovation could be used for reconnaissance missions, inventors say

Mind control is a staple of sci-fi films such as X-Men, but a Chinese student has now made the technology a reality.

Using just his thoughts, he is shown in a video controlling the movement of the cyborg insect, fitted with electrodes and a chip, by wearing an electroencephalography (EEG) headset.

After guiding the robo-roach around an S-shaped bend, he uses his brain patterns to negotiate a zig-zag path accurately.

The scientist was able to control the movement of the cyborg insect, fitted with electrodes and a chip (pictured) by wearing an electroencephalography (EEG) headset that can read specific brain patterns

The scientist was able to control the movement of the cyborg insect, fitted with electrodes and a chip (pictured) by wearing an electroencephalography (EEG) headset that can read specific brain patterns

But despite his amazing mind-control feat, Li Guangye, a postgraduate student at China’s Shanghai Jiaotong University (SJTU) only won second place in the 2015 IEEE RAS students’ video contest.

His innovation was pipped to the post by Osman Doğan Yirmibeşoğlu from Özyeğin University in Istanbul, Turkey, whose video, entitled ‘Robots are on our side’ shows them writing in lights and playing rock, paper, scissors among other actions.

Third place went to a researcher behind a robot than can make pizzas by copying a human.

It is not the first time that cockroaches wearing electronic ‘backpacks’ have been controlled by humans, but it is the first time they have been controlled directly by the human mind.

Mr Guangye implanted live microelectrodes to stimulate nerves in the insect’s antennae.

These electrodes are linked to a remote control or central computer via a wireless network.

Student creates cyborg cockroach he controls with THOUGHTS

 The student shows how the robo-roach can be guided around an S-shaped bend before negotiating a zig-zag path accurately

The system has numerous parts so that the wearer's brainwaves are sent to a central computer which then decodes them and sends them to the cockroach's backpack in order to control its actions (shown above)

The system has numerous parts so that the wearer’s brainwaves are sent to a central computer which then decodes them and sends them to the cockroach’s backpack in order to control its actions (shown above)

It is not the first time cockroaches wearing electronic ‘backpacks’ have been controlled by humans, but it is the first time they've been controlled directly by a human mind. Here, the insect is guided on an S-shaped path

It is not the first time cockroaches wearing electronic ‘backpacks’ have been controlled by humans, but it is the first time they’ve been controlled directly by a human mind. Here, the insect is guided on an S-shaped path

Brainwaves, read by the EEG headset, are transmitted to the controller.

The headset decodes the directional intention of the wearer from eye movements, for example, and sends this to the electronic ‘backpack’ receiver on the back of the roach, so that it can be steered in the right direction.

The ‘backpacks’ control the robo-roach’s movements because they are wired to the insect’s cerci – sensory organs cockroaches usually use to feel if their abdomens are brushing against something.

Brainwaves, read by an EEG headset, are transmitted to the central controller where they are decoded and the instructions are sent to the cockroach's backpack, to guide it round a route (pictured)

Brainwaves, read by an EEG headset, are transmitted to the central controller where they are decoded and the instructions are sent to the cockroach’s backpack, to guide it round a route (pictured)

Mind control is a staple of sci-fi films such as X-Men, but now it’s also a reality in animals. An image of Professor X played by Patrick Stewart from the film X-Men is shown

Mind control is a staple of sci-fi films such as X-Men, but now it’s also a reality in animals. An image of Professor X played by Patrick Stewart from the film X-Men is shown

THE APP THAT LETS YOU CONTROL A COCKROACH AT HOME

Backyard Brains created an electric backpack that fits onto a cockroach and makes the insect turn on command using electric impulses.

The firm began selling DIY kits for $99 (£66) in 2013, meaning anyone can use the tech.

The Roboroach stimulates the creature’s antenna and forces it to turn left and right at the touch of a button, while the backpack links with an app used as the remote control.

Its movements are controlled by electrodes that connect to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

To attach the backpack, users dip the bug into ice water to ‘anaesthetise’ it.

A patch of shell on its head is sanded and electrodes are stuck to it using superglue.

The groundwire is then inserted into the insect’s thorax and the antennae is trimmed so silver electrodes can be placed into them.

Its makers claim it would make a great classroom aide to teach children about how the brain works.

Although they also insist the cockroaches are treated humanely, they risk a backlash from animal rights activists who say it is cruel.

By electrically stimulating the cerci, cockroaches can be prompted to move in a certain direction.

The new development has been hailed as a sensation in allowing human beings to beam their thoughts to animals in order to control them, but animal rights charities are likely to be unimpressed with the breakthrough.

The researchers claim the project has extended existing brain-computer interface technology and attempts brain-to-brain communication.

In the future, the cockroaches could be used for reconnaissance missions and the next step is to control an ‘army’ of cockroaches at once.

Electrical engineers at North Carolina State University also believe cyborg cockroaches could be used to survey areas and sent to disaster zones to seek out humans trapped under rubble.

They too have used backpacks to control cockroaches – using a remote control rather than the mind – but their backpacks are also equipped with an array of three directional microphones to detect the direction of the sound and steer the biobot in the right direction towards it.

Another type is fitted with a single microphone to capture sound from any direction, which can be wirelessly transmitted – perhaps in the future to emergency workers.

They ‘worked well’ in lab tests and the experts have developed technology that can be used as an ‘invisible fence’ to keep the biobots in a certain area such as a disaster area.

‘Robots are on our side’ won the 2015 IEEE RAS students’ contest

The cockroach innovation was pipped to the post by Osman Doğan Yirmibeşoğlu of Özyeğin University in Istanbul, Turkey, whose video (above) entitled ‘Robots are on our side’ shows them writing in lights and playing rock, paper, scissors among other actions

Mr Guangye implanted live microelectrodes to stimulate nerves in the insect’s antennae. These electrodes (pictured) are linked to a remote control or central computer via a wireless network

Mr Guangye implanted live microelectrodes to stimulate nerves in the insect’s antennae. These electrodes (pictured) are linked to a remote control or central computer via a wireless network

 

Is your child eating cancer-causing glyphosate for breakfast? Most likely, yes


Although there aren’t any genetically modified oats on the marketplace today, that doesn’t mean we should run to stores with open arms, thankful that we’re eating healthy foods. The truth is, products containing oats are typically sprayed with the cancer-causing herbicide ingredient — you know, the one that a division of the World Health Organization recently deemed “probably carcinogenic to humans” — known as glyphosate.(1,2)

See, unfortunately, it’s perfectly acceptable for non-GMO crops to be sprayed with glyphosate, so long as it’s done prior to planting or just before harvest. In the instance of non-organic oats, they’re sprayed with glyphosate (Roundup’s active ingredient), so they’re essentially in the same health-harming category as Roundup Ready GM corn, canola and soy.(2)

Now, armed with this information, consider what you or your child may typically eat for breakfast. If it’s a bowl full of oat-based cereal, chances are, it has its roots in glyphosate. Even worse, the issue isn’t going away anytime soon, considering the upsetting fact that the largest oat miller in North America, Richardson Milling, says it has no intention of stopping its sale of glyphosate-soaked oats.(3)

Largest oat miller in North America plans to continue supporting glyphosate

Tracey Shelton, director of corporate communications with Richardson International, said, “As a miller, we are not aware of any scientific assessment or findings that would suggest the quality or functionality of oat products are affected, when manufactured from oats treated with glyphosate.” Of course, with such a statement, we wonder what planet she may be living on, or why she’s not well versed in the latest glyphosate findings, as her comment represents utter disregard for all the information that has been widely publicized for years, but more so over the past few months.(3)

Terry Tyson, a procurement manager with the Canadian oat buyer Grain Millers, has noticed problems with their oats similar to frost damage. The issue was ultimately traced back to pre-harvest application of glyphosate. He’s also noticed changes in beta-glucan levels, which is basically the reason behind oat-based cereals carrying “heart healthy” claims. Tyson maintains that glyphosate has jeopardized these levels.(3)

Still, Shelton says that she’s not concerned about glyphosate. Of the ingredient, she says, “It’s not like we’re getting a lot of questions or requests.”(3)

So, essentially, that oat-based, heart-healthy breakfast that you and your children may be eating for breakfast is likely not so heart-healthy anyway, and worse, is contaminated with glyphosate. Sickening.

Shelton isn’t the only one standing by the pre-harvest use of glyphosate. It’s no surprise that Monsanto is on board with this. Still, it’s shocking to actually see their commitment to ill health sprawled out on the pages of one of their reviews. With two before-and-after images of corn, it touts the benefits of the chemical, stating, “Uneven maturity and green tissue delays harvest. Spraying glyphosate desiccates green foliage & stems.” A few sentences beforehand, it’s mentioned that “glyphosate is safe for humans, birds and the environment so long as it is applied carefully” and that it’s a great way to ripen uneven non-seed crops and control weeds prior to harvest.(4)

How you can help: Petition to get Roundup banned from Home Depot and Lowe’s

Clearly, Monsanto is going to cling to their belief that glyphosate can do no harm. However, we can rattle their cages by persisting in our quest to make its hazards known.

For example, why not consider signing a petition to ban their Roundup from being sold in Home Depot and Lowe’s stores? A petition for each store exists on Change.org; click here for Home Depot and here for Lowe’s.(5,6) The health hazards associated with Roundup’s glyphosate are outlined in each petition, followed by this statement:

Carrying this product is irresponsible and endangers the health of the public and particularly children. For that reason, Lowe’s should discontinue carrying and selling products containing glyphosate. Doing so would show that they care more about the public’s health and the communities that support them than they do about selling this product that has been linked to cancer and other health issues. Conversely, if Lowe’s were to ignore this petition and continue to sell glyphosate-containing products, it would show their customers and the communities who support their business that they value the sales of this product more than they value the health of you or your children.

The same statement is made on the Change.org petition for Home Depot.

Standing against the horror that is glyphosate is a necessity. While Monsanto sits back and watches their bank accounts thrive as people’s health falters, we can at least continue to stay informed and do our part by signing these petitions.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/049972_glyphosate_oat_cereal_Roundup.html#ixzz3cIEgsTpt

US doctors perform historic skull-scalp transplant


World’s first skull-scalp transplant was performed by American surgeons on a man who suffered a large head wound from cancer treatment, a major breakthrough in transplant surgery.

MD Anderson Cancer Center and Houston Methodist Hospital doctors announced on Thursday that they did the 15-hour operation on May 22 at Houston Methodist.

James Boysen, a 55-year-old software developer from Austin, received the craniofacial tissue transplant at the same time as a kidney and pancreas transplant at Houston Methodist Hospital in surgeries that lasted nearly a day.

A photo of Boysen after the surgery shows him with sutures in a ring around the top of his head, about 2.5 cm above his ears, where the transplanted skull and scalp were attached.

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Transplant patient Jim Boysen speaks during a news conference at Houston Methodist Hospital on Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Houston. (AP photo)

The man who led the plastic surgery team, Dr Michael Klebuc, told media that it was a very complex microvascular procedure. “We transplanted missing skull bone in the overlying hair bearing scalp — not just that tissue but the nutrient blood vessels that come with it,” he said.

“Boysen is showing some early sensation which is quite extraordinary. The other thing that’s interesting is that you can actually see him perspire on the scalp now that it’s been transplanted,” he said.

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From left, Michael Kiebuc, MD, of Houston Methodist Hospital, Jesse C. Selber, MD, MPH, of MD Anderson Cancer Center, and A. Osama Gaber, MD, of Houston Methodist Hospital. (AP photo)

“This kind of a triple transplantation has never been reported before and to our knowledge no-one has reported just the skull and the scalp as well,” Klebuc said.

“He (Boysen) had a series of cancers of the scalp and skull that were treated with various surgeries and radiation that left him with a large wound that was all the way down to his brain,” said Jesse Selber, a reconstructive plastic surgeon who was the co-leader of the team that performed the intricate surgery.

Boysen had a kidney-pancreas transplant in 1992 to treat diabetes he has had since the age of five and has been on drugs to prevent organ rejection.

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A. Osama Gaber, MD, of Houston Methodist Hospital, greets transplant patient Jim Boysen before the news conference. (AP photo)


The immune suppression drugs raise the risk of cancer, and he developed a rare type – leiomyosarcoma. Radiation therapy for the cancer destroyed part of his head, immune suppression drugs kept his body from repairing the damage, and his transplanted organs were starting to fail – “a perfect storm that made the wound not heal,” Boysen said.

“I’m amazed at how great I feel and am forever grateful that I have another chance to get back to doing the things I love and be with the people I love,” Boysen said after the surgery.

Monosodium glutamate (MSG): Is it harmful?


Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified MSG as a food ingredient that’s “generally recognized as safe,” but its use remains controversial. For this reason, when MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label.

MSG has been used as a food additive for decades. Over the years, the FDA has received many anecdotal reports of adverse reactions to foods containing MSG. These reactions — known as MSG symptom complex — include:

  • Headache
  • Flushing
  • Sweating
  • Facial pressure or tightness
  • Numbness, tingling or burning in the face, neck and other areas
  • Rapid, fluttering heartbeats (heart palpitations)
  • Chest pain
  • Nausea
  • Weakness

However, researchers have found no definitive evidence of a link between MSG and these symptoms. Researchers acknowledge, though, that a small percentage of people may have short-term reactions to MSG. Symptoms are usually mild and don’t require treatment. The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG