Top 10 physics breakthroughs listed


Top 10 physics breakthroughs listed http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30415007

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College students find Hookah smoking safer than cigarettes


http://www.deccanchronicle.com/141213/lifestyle-health-and-wellbeing/article/collage-students-find-hookah-smoking-safer-cigarettes

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10 Best Plants to Grow Indoors for Air Purification


http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2014/01/10-best-plants-to-grow-indoors-for-air-purification.html?m=1

From the desk of Zedie.

Health Benefits of Aloe Vera: Grow Your Own Medicine


http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/04/health-benefits-of-aloe-vera-grow-your-own-medicine.html?m=1

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Rare disease makes 28-year-old woman look 80


http://www.presstv.com/detail/2014/12/13/390053/disease-makes-young-woman-look-80/

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Disturbed mitochondrial dynamics and neurodegenerative disorders : Nature Reviews Neurology : Nature Publishing Group


http://www.nature.com/nrneurol/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nrneurol.2014.228.html?WT.mc_id=FBK_NatureReviews

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Does Chyawanprash Really Help In Enhancing Immunity? | CureJoy


http://www.curejoy.com/content/chyawanprash-really-help-enhancing-immunity/

From the desk of Zedie.

How to Use Dark Chocolate as a Medicine


Some medical claims sound too good to be true, but as it turns out – you really can use chocolate dark chocolate as a medicine. Turn out, dark chocolate is full of nutrients and loaded with health benefits.

chocolate2

Dark Chocolate as A Natural Medicine

1. Dark Chocolate Makes You Smarter:
It’s true. Studies have shown that those who consume a nice hot cup of hot chocolate in the evenings before bed have over time improved brain function. It does this by increasing the blood flow in your brain and your heart, which instantly improves your cognitive function.

2. Dark Chocolate Gives You Youth:
High in anti-oxidants, dark chocolate helps combat the radical cell damage caused by toxins and free radical activity through aging. Stay young and healthy by eating chocolate.

3. Dark Chocolate is Excellent for The Heart:
Studies have shown that those who do indulge in eating dark chocolate have lower blood pressure, improved blood flow and have a smaller risk of blood clots. Strengthen your heart by eating dark chocolate 3 times a week.

4. Dark Chocolate Improves Your Mood:
Chocolate has been proven to put you in a better mood, make you calmer and feel more relaxed. Which is just as important as any other health benefit. Now you know why you want chocolate when you’re stressed or in despair.

5. Dark Chocolate is a Vitamin Source:
Chocolate contains some great vitamins and minerals that support good health. This list includes: potassium, copper, magnesium, iron. All of which are in high concentrations to provide you with the protection against such things as: stroke, anemia, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes.

6. Reduce Your Cholesterol:
Regular consumption of dark chocolate may reduce your cholesterol. Its antioxidants protect oxidation of LDL cholesterol and prevents artery damage.

7. Hot Raw Chocolate For A Cough:
Chocolate contains theobromine which soothes a cough and has a similar effect to codeine. So try a hot cup of almond milk and raw cocoa when you have a cough.

8. Lower Your Blood Pressure:
Flavanols help your arteries to relax, which lowers blood flow and blood pressure.

9. Reduce Stress Levels:
Dark chocolate contains magnesium, which gives us a happy, feel good vibe and lifts our spirit. And there is more – compounds found in dark chocolate lower cortisol levels to relax body and mind.

10. Dark Chocolate Protects Your Skin
Flavonoids in dark chocolate protect your skin from UV damage. But don´t see it as your new sunscreen, you still need that when going out in the sun.

11. Natural Painkiller
Chocolate stimulates our body to produce calming and pain relieving endorphins.

Health coach Amy Goodrich goes on to say, “…don’t get me wrong here… although there are plenty of health benefits, chocolate is unfortunately also high in calories coming from fat and sugar. So don’t swap all your veggie and fruit snacks with chocolate. Like with many things in life, moderation is the key here.”

Sources:
Healthy and Natural World
Healthy Holistic Living

Why Some Remember Dreams, Others Don’t


People who tend to remember their dreams also respond more strongly than others to hearing their name when they’re awake, new research suggests.

Everyone dreams during sleep, but not everyone recalls the mental escapade the next day, and scientists aren’t sure why some people remember more than others.

To find out, researchers used electroencephalography to record the electrical activity in the brains of 36 people while the participants listened to background tunes, and occasionally heard their own first name. The brain measurements were taken during wakefulness and sleep. Half of the participants were called high recallers, because they reported remembering their dreams almost every day, whereas the other half, low recallers, said they only remembered their dreams once or twice a month.

A woman appearing as if she is dreaming or in a surreal world.
When asleep, both groups showed similar changes in brain activity in response to hearing their names, which were played quietly enough not to wake them.

However, when awake, high recallers showed a more sustained decrease in a brain wave called the alpha wave when they heard their names, compared with the low recallers.

“It was quite surprising to see a difference between the groups during wakefulness,” said study researcher Perrine Ruby, neuroscientist at Lyon Neuroscience Research Center in France.

The difference could reflect variations in the brains of high and low recallers that could have a role in how they dream, too, Ruby said. [7 Mind-Bending Facts About Dreams]

Who remembers their dreams

A well-established theory suggests that a decrease in the alpha wave is a sign that brain regions are being inhibited from responding to outside stimuli. Studies show that when people hear a sudden sound or open their eyes, and more brain regions become active, the alpha wave is reduced.

In the study, as predicted, both groups showed a decrease in the alpha wave when they heard their names while awake. But high recallers showed a more prolonged decrease, which may be a sign their brains became more widely activated when they heard their names.

In other words, high recallers may engage more brain regions when processing sounds while awake, compared with low recallers, the researchers said.

While people are asleep, the alpha wave behaves in the opposite way —it increases when a sudden sound is heard. Scientists aren’t certain why this happens, but one idea is that it protects the brain from being interrupted by sounds during sleep, Ruby said.

Indeed, the study participants showed an increase in the alpha wave in response to sounds during sleep, and there was no difference between the groups.

One possibility to explain the lack of difference, the researchers said, could be that perhaps high recallers had a larger increase in alpha waves, but it was so high that they woke up.

Time spent awake, during the night

The researchers saw that high recallers awoke more frequently during the night. They were awake, on average, for 30 minutes during the night, whereas low recallers were awake for 14 minutes. However, Ruby said “both figures are in the normal range, it’s not that there’s something wrong with either group.”

Altogether, the results suggest the brain of high recallers may be more reactive to stimuli such as sounds, which could make them wake up more easily. It is more likely a person would remember their dreams if they are awakened immediately after one, Ruby said.

However, waking up at night can account for only a part of the differences people show in remembering dreams. “There’s still much more to understand,” she said.

Infertility is a warning: Poor semen quality linked to hypertension, other health problems


A study of men who were evaluated for the cause of their infertility finds previously unknown relationships between deficiencies in their semen and other, seemingly unrelated health problems.
A study of more than 9,000 men with fertility problems has revealed a correlation between the number of different defects in a man’s semen and the likelihood that the man has other health problems.
Credit: © RTimages / Fotolia

A study of men who were evaluated for the cause of their infertility finds previously unknown relationships between deficiencies in their semen and other, seemingly unrelated health problems.

A study of more than 9,000 men with fertility problems has revealed a correlation between the number of different defects in a man’s semen and the likelihood that the man has other health problems.

The study, conducted by investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine, also links poor semen quality to a higher chance of having various specific health conditions, such as hypertension, and more generally to skin and endocrine disorders.

The findings, published online Dec. 10 in Fertility and Sterility, may spur more-comprehensive approaches to treating male infertility. They also point to the wisdom of performing complete physical examinations of men experiencing reproductive difficulties.

“About 15 percent of all couples have fertility issues, and in half of those cases the male partner has semen deficiencies,” said the study’s lead author, Michael Eisenberg, MD, assistant professor of urology and director of male reproductive medicine and surgery at Stanford. “We should be paying more attention to these millions of men. Infertility is a warning: Problems with reproduction may mean problems with overall health.”

A study Eisenberg co-authored a few years ago showed that infertile men had higher rates of overall mortality, as well as mortality linked to heart problems, in the years following an infertility evaluation. “But here, we’re already spotting signs of trouble in young men in their 30s,” he said.

Analyzing medical records

In the new study, Eisenberg and his colleagues analyzed the medical records of 9,387 men, mostly between 30 and 50 years old, who had been evaluated at Stanford Hospital & Clinics (now Stanford Health Care) between 1994 and 2011 to determine the cause of their infertility. The men had routinely provided semen samples, which the researchers assessed for characteristics including volume, concentration and motility. In about half of all the male infertility cases, the problem was abnormal semen; in the rest, the fault lay elsewhere. So, using the database, the investigators were able to compare the overall health status of men who had semen defects to that of the men who didn’t.

With a median age of 38, this was a fairly young group of men. However, 44 percent of all the men had some additional health problem besides the fertility problem that brought them to the clinic. In particular, the investigators found a substantial link between poor semen quality and specific diseases of the circulatory system, notably hypertension, vascular disease and heart disease. “To the best of my knowledge, there’s never been a study showing this association before,” said Eisenberg. “There are a lot of men who have hypertension, so understanding that correlation is of huge interest to us.”

In addition, as the number of different kinds of defects in a man’s semen rose, so did his likelihood of having a skin disease or endocrine disorder. When looking at the severity of all health problems, the scientists observed a statistically significant connection between the number of different ways in which a man’s semen was deficient and the likelihood of his having a substantial health problem.

Health, semen quality ‘strongly correlated’

The study wasn’t designed to determine precisely how connections between semen deficiencies and seemingly unrelated disorders, such as cardiovascular or endocrine disease, come about. But, Eisenberg noted, some 15 percent of all genes in the human genome are connected fairly directly to reproduction, and most of these genes also have diverse functions in other bodily systems. He also noted that it may not be a disease itself, but the treatment for the disease, that’s actually responsible for reproductive malfunction. He said he is exploring this possibility now.

As we treat men’s infertility, we should also assess their overall health.

“A man’s health is strongly correlated with his semen quality,” he said. “Given the high incidence of infertility, we need to take a broader view. As we treat men’s infertility, we should also assess their overall health. That visit to a fertility clinic represents a big opportunity to improve their treatment for other conditions, which we now suspect could actually help resolve the infertility they came in for in the first place.”

The senior author of the study is Mark Cullen, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford. Other Stanford co-authors are professor of reproductive endocrinology and fertility Barry Behr, PhD; former professor of obstetrics and gynecology Renee Reijo Pera, PhD; and statistical programmer Shufeng Li.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Stanford University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael L. Eisenberg, Shufeng Li, Barry Behr, Renee Reijo Pera, Mark R. Cullen.Relationship between semen production and medical comorbidity. Fertility and Sterility, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.10.017