This Guys Digitally Recreates His Dreams.


 

This Guys Digitally Recreates His Dreams

Every morning after waking up, one reddit user tries to digitally recreate the dream he had the night before. Here are some of his favorites:

See more at Truth Seeker Daily

– See more at: http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/this-guys-digitally-recreates-his-dreams/#sthash.keFEby3j.dpuf

http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/this-guys-digitally-recreates-his-dreams/

From the desk of Zedie.

World’s best thermometer made from light.


University of Adelaide physics researchers have produced the world’s most sensitive thermometer – three times more precise than the best thermometers in existence.

Published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers from the University’s Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) report they have been able to measure with a precision of 30 billionths of a degree.

“We believe this is the best measurement ever made of temperature − at ,” says project leader Professor Andre Luiten, Chair of Experimental Physics in IPAS and the School of Chemistry and Physics, pointing out that it is possible to make more sensitive measurements of temperature in cryogenic environments (at very low temperatures) near absolute zero.

“We’ve been able to measure temperature differences to 30 billionths of a degree in one second,” says Professor Luiten.

“To emphasise how precise this is, when we examine the temperature of an object we find that it is always fluctuating. We all knew that if you looked closely enough you find that all the atoms in any material are always jiggling about, but we actually see this unceasing fluctuation with our thermometer, showing that the microscopic world is always in motion.”

The paper – Nano-Kelvin Thermometry and Temperature Control: Beyond the Thermal Noise Limit – describes a new and very sensitive, but unorthodox, thermometer that uses light to measure temperature. PhD candidate Wenle Weng carried out the work.

https://i1.wp.com/cdn.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/2014/thermometer1small.jpg

The injects two colours of light (red and green) into a highly polished crystalline disk. The two colours travel at slightly different speeds in the crystal, depending on the temperature of the crystal.

“When we heat up the crystal we find that the red light slows down by a tiny amount with respect to the green light,” Professor Luiten says.

“By forcing the to circulate thousands of times around the edge of this disk in the same way that sound concentrates and reinforces itself in a curve in a phenomena known as a “whispering gallery” – as seen in St Paul’s Cathedral in London or the Whispering Wall at Barossa Reservoir – then we can measure this minuscule difference in speed with great precision.”

Professor Luiten says the researchers have developed a new technique which could be redesigned for ultra-sensitive measurements of other things such as pressure, humidity, force or searching for a particular chemical.

“Being able to measure many different aspects of our environment with such a high degree of precision, using instruments small enough to carry around, has the capacity to revolutionise technologies used for a variety of industrial and medical applications where detection of trace amounts has great importance,” Professor Luiten says.

Constipation: 6 Ways to Unblock Yourself.


You’re bloated and blocked. You strain on the toilet with no results — or with results that are painful. You’re constipated.

Constipation is common. Sometimes it stems from stress. Other times it comes from bad diet or lifestyle choices. Still other times, it’s brought on by a medical condition that requires a doctor’s attention.

You can find relief, though, whether your constipation is a typical case or something more serious. The difference comes in how you find relief.

1. Solutions are simple for most people

Most of the time constipation happens because you’re not eating the right foods, you’re not drinking enough water and you’re not exercising enough. So the fixes are straightforward: Move more, drink more water and add fiber to your diet to add bulk to your stool. Some of my patients have had success taking probiotics, too, to change the composition of the bacteria in the gut.

“Here’s the bottom line: Try simple fixes first, but if they fail, don’t suffer needlessly.”

Brooke Gurland, MD

Department of Colorectal Surgery

2. Make time to move your bowels

This may sound simple, but people don’t always make bathroom time a priority. Try waking up earlier to eat breakfast and then move your bowels. Food can stimulate the need to go, and your home bathroom may be more relaxing. But don’t avoid public bathrooms when you feel the urge, either. Delaying a bowel movement can make constipation worse.

3. Look to your plate

Have you made a major change in your diet? Sometimes drastic changes to what you eat can cause constipation. For example, if you suddenly cut all fat from your diet, it’s easy to get blocked up. This can occur in weightlifters who eat all protein, no fat. It can happen in people with eating disorders, too. You don’t want to overdo fat, but you need a little to move things through your bowel.

4. When to see a doctor

Sometimes simple changes are not enough. If your constipation is more than just a short-term bother, if it’s not responding to treatments and if it lasts for weeks, get yourself checked out to exclude more serious medical causes. Chronic constipation can be a sign of conditions such as hyperthyroidism, hypercalcemia, celiac disease or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It’s especially important to see a professional if you have other symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, cramping or spasms.

5. Fiber is not always the answer

Fiber works for most people, but not all. If fiber makes you more bloated and blocked than before, it could mean many different things. For example, in “slow transit constipation,” a condition where the bowel does not move things quickly through, fiber just sits there in your gut and can make you feel worse. Long story short: If fiber makes you worse, don’t just add more. Seek help.

6. If your constipation is serious, you have options

People with slow motility or IBS don’t have a cure for constipation, but you can treat it. There’s a wide range of laxatives available, plus pro-motility drugs that a doctor can prescribe. Sometimes at-home remedies can bring relief, too, including increasing dietary vegetable or mineral oil to lubricate the bowels. For people with celiac disease or wheat intolerance, cutting out gluten can make a world of difference.

Here’s the bottom line: Try simple fixes first, but if they fail, don’t suffer needlessly. See a doctor — and find out what treatments can get your bowels moving again.

No Batteries Here: New Implants Can Charge Through Your Body’s Own Tissue .


A device being tested by Stanford University researchers is the latest in an area of medical development known as “electroceuticals.

Open up the average laptop and you’ll see two things: a processor about the size of a half-dollar and the relatively massive parts needed to power it—most notably, the battery.

The same applies to electronic medical implants, such as pacemakers. But inside the human body, there often isn’t room for a big power pack. So a team of researchers, led by Ada Poon, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the Stanford University School of Engineering, have developed a way to wirelessly charge devices implanted inside the body—allowing for medical devices as small as a grain of rice.

The team’s charging system is a riff on the technology used to power electric toothbrushes, smartphones and other small devices. In those setups, electricity passes through a coil in a power source, creating an electromagnetic field. A corresponding coil in the device itself collects energy from that field, which induces a current that can power the device or charge a battery. This type of wave, known as “near-field,” however, can’t travel very far or pass through tissue.

While there is room for a pacemaker with a battery pack near the heart, other parts of the body provide less area to work with. In the brain, for instance, there isn’t room for an implant to sit right at a treatment site. Instead, doctors would need to place it where there’s a relatively open area, such as the back of the neck, and use wires to reach the target site.

“We’re by no means the first people to do wireless powering for medical implants,” explains John Ho, a graduate student who co-authored the study. “[Implants are] used for things like cochlear implants, but the [power source] itself has to be fairly large and the implant has to be very shallow. They can’t reach the important places in the body, like the heart or the brain.”

That’s why Poon’s work aims to explore how to use “biological tissue to transport energy,” she says. Her 2-mm-by-3-mm electronic implant is powered through the body with a credit-card-sized source (charged independently) outside it.

Her team found a unique method to manipulate the waves so that they propagate and pass through live tissue. The power source generates near-field electromagnetic waves of a specific pattern. As the pulses hit and interact with live tissue, they become a new type of wave, called “mid-field.” “When you place [our power source] over the body, the properties of your tissue actually convert the waves,” she explains.

Pulmonary Fibrosis Associated with Aluminum Trihydrate (Corian) Dust .


A 64-year-old man who was an exercise physiologist was noted to have clinical and physiological features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.1 On detailed questioning, he stated that he had ground, machined, drilled, and sanded Corian (a solid-surface material composed of acrylic polymer and aluminum trihydrate2) in his garage for about 16 years (Figure 1A

Figure 1

Findings Indicating a Potential Causal Relationship between Corian Dust and Pulmonary Fibrosis in the Patient.). He had typical clinical features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and radiographic features of usual interstitial pneumonia, and a surgical lung biopsy showed histologic features of usual interstitial pneumonia (Figure 1B and 1C), a hallmark of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Prompted by an elicited history of exposure and findings on polarized light microscopy (Figure 1D), we conducted further tissue analyses that showed aluminum trihydroxide in the fibrotic lung (Figure 1E and 1F); this finding provided support for a potential causal relationship between the Corian dust and pulmonary fibrosis. Although the patient avoided further exposure to Corian dust, his respiratory status slowly deteriorated over the next 7 years and he died from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. High-resolution computed tomographic images of the chest showed an overall pattern that was consistent with end-stage usual interstitial pneumonia. At autopsy, the lungs were small; aluminum trihydroxide was detected in the fibrotic lungs.

Although the evidence from this single case is circumstantial, the history of exposure, analyses of the lung tissue, and the sample of dust obtained from the patient’s environment are consistent with a causal association. Pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with metal dusts and aluminum.3,4 A meta-analysis of six case–control studies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis showed a significant association between metal exposures and this condition.5 Without the elicited history of exposure to Corian dust and the finding of birefringent particles in the tissue, we would not have considered Corian dust as a potential cause of pulmonary fibrosis and the patient would have been considered to have idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.1 Although the findings from this case do not confirm causality, until further data to support or refute the association are available, inquiry into each patient’s occupational and environmental exposures should be made when considering a diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Source: NEJM

What is a Meningioma?


A meningioma is a type of tumor that develops from the meninges, the membrane that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. Most meningiomas (90 percent) are categorized as benign tumors, with the remaining 10 percent being atypical or malignant. In many cases, benign meningiomas grow slowly. This means that depending upon where it is located, a meningioma may reach a relatively large size before it causes symptoms.

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Meningiomas account for about 27 percent of primary brain tumors, making them the most common tumor of that type. With May marking Brain Tumor Awareness Month, we’re looking at some common questions about meningiomas:

What are the risk factors of meningiomas?

Meningiomas are most common in people between the ages of 40 and 70, and are more common in women than in men. Meningiomas are very rare in children, with pediatric cases accounting for only 1.5 percent of the total. There are not many predisposing factors associated with the development of meningiomas, but a few include:

  • Previous trauma – Meningiomas have been found at the site of previous trauma (such as near a previous skull fracture, scarred dura, or around foreign bodies), but the relationship between trauma and meningioma risk isn’t fully understood.
  • Radiation – Exposure to radiation has been associated with a higher incidence of meningiomas.
  • Genetic predisposition – People with a genetic disorder known as neurofibromatosis type 2 (Nf2) are more likely to develop meningiomas.

 

What are the common symptoms of meningiomas?

Not all meningiomas are symptomatic, particularly if they are small or developed relatively recently. Patients with symptomatic meningiomas may experience:

  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Seizures
  • Numbness
  • Weakness in the arms or legs
  • Speech difficulty

 

What are treatment options for meningiomas?

There are generally three treatment options for meningiomas:

  • Observation – If a meningioma is small and asymptomatic in a person over 65, it may just be observed. Observation requires annual CT or MRI scans with contrast. Typically, asymptomatic meningiomas can be observed for a period of 3 to 12 months before a definitive treatment decision is made.
  • Surgery – Surgery is the primary treatment for meningiomas, and is tailored to the size and location of the tumor. Complete removal is the ideal result.
  • Radiotherapy – Several recent studies have  shown radiotherapy to control tumor growth by 50 to 90 percent. Newer forms of focal radiotherapy (such as radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, or intensity modulated radiotherapy) also are effective and minimize effects  of radiation on the surrounding brain tissue.

 

How successful is meningioma treatment?

Eighty percent of patients reported satisfaction with the quality of their lives after undergoing treatment. The location of a patient’s tumor within the brain is the most important factor in determining  the success of treatment. Due to their location, certain types of meningiomas (convexity, parasagittal and lateral sphenoid wing) usually are completely removable through surgery, yielding excellent results. Optic sheath and skull-based meningiomas can be more difficult to remove surgically. Older patients or those or in poor health prior to surgery may face additional challenges during treatment and recovery.

 

Where can I find support for myself or family member diagnosed with a meningioma?

Your physician can answer questions about meningioma diagnosis and help you select appropriate treatment options.  Additionally, there are many groups that provide ongoing support to patients and families living with meningiomas. The National Brain Tumor Society and the Brain Science Foundation provide a list of support groups on their websites.

This post originally appeared on the Brigham and Women’s Hospital HealthHub blog. For more information on brain tumors, visit the website for the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center.

Leptin also influences brain cells that control appetite, study finds


http://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2014-06-leptin-brain-cells-appetite.html

From the desk of Zedie.

Can Childhood Mumps Virus Prevent Ovarian Cancer?


Researchers have found that young women with breast cancer were able to better preserve their fertility during cancer treatments by using hormone-blocking drug injections that put them into temporary menopause. The results announced today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago are from the Prevention of Early Menopause Study (POEMS), a clinical trial sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (ASCO late breaking abstract #505). Women receiving the injections were only about one-third as likely to experience ovarian failure, a common long-term toxicity of chemotherapy treatments, and were more than twice as likely to have a normal pregnancy after their cancer treatment compared to women in the trial who did not receive the injections.

In POEMS, premenopausal women with hormone-receptor negative breast cancer ages 18 to 49 were randomly assigned to receive standard chemotherapy with or without goserelin every four weeks. Goserelin is a drug that disrupts the body’s hormonal feedback systems, resulting in reduced estrogen production, which puts the women into a chemical menopause. Under usual use, that chemical menopause is reversible; POEMS was carried out to see if the treatment allowed the women to recover fertility after cancer treatment while not interfering with the cancer treatment itself.

The researchers compared the ovarian failure rate of the women two years after entering the study and found that 22 percent of patients on the standard therapy had ovarian failure (15 of 69 patients) compared to 8 percent of those who also had goserelin treatment (5 of  66 patients). Of the 218 patients enrolled in the trial, 12 patients on the standard arm (11 percent) became pregnant vs 22 patients on the goserelin treatment arm (21 percent).

“This trial was the first demonstration of improved fertility prospects and more successful pregnancies when goserelin was used,” said Halle Moore, M.D., Cleveland Clinical Foundation and the lead investigator for POEMS. “Premenopausal women beginning chemotherapy for early breast cancer should consider this new option to prevent premature ovarian failure.”

The trial was conducted by SWOG, one of NCI’s five National Clinical Trial Network groups, with the collaboration of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, and international access provided through the International Breast Cancer Study Group which includes the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Group.

The standard approach to preserving fertility in young female cancer patients is to harvest and store ovarian tissue, ovarian follicles, or embryos prior to cancer treatment. “Finding a simple and accessible way to protect fertility in young breast cancer patients while not harming cancer outcomes is an important issue,” said Lori Minasian, M.D., deputy director of the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention and one of the researchers on POEMS.

Fertility-preserving treatment was not expected to have an effect on cancer outcomes and this data was analyzed only to ensure there were no detrimental effects from that treatment.

In the United States alone almost 49,000 women under age 50 are diagnosed with invasive breast cancer each year; nearly 11,000 of those are under age 40. Of this population, about 15 percent have breast cancer that is hormone-receptor negative, meaning the disease does not feed on hormones or respond to therapy against hormones.

Treatment helps young women preserve fertility during breast cancer chemo.


Researchers have found that young women with breast cancer were able to better preserve their fertility during cancer treatments by using hormone-blocking drug injections that put them into temporary menopause. The results announced today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago are from the Prevention of Early Menopause Study (POEMS), a clinical trial sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (ASCO late breaking abstract #505). Women receiving the injections were only about one-third as likely to experience ovarian failure, a common long-term toxicity of chemotherapy treatments, and were more than twice as likely to have a normal pregnancy after their cancer treatment compared to women in the trial who did not receive the injections.

In POEMS, premenopausal women with hormone-receptor negative breast cancer ages 18 to 49 were randomly assigned to receive standard chemotherapy with or without goserelin every four weeks. Goserelin is a drug that disrupts the body’s hormonal feedback systems, resulting in reduced estrogen production, which puts the women into a chemical menopause. Under usual use, that chemical menopause is reversible; POEMS was carried out to see if the treatment allowed the women to recover fertility after cancer treatment while not interfering with the cancer treatment itself.

The researchers compared the ovarian failure rate of the women two years after entering the study and found that 22 percent of patients on the standard therapy had ovarian failure (15 of 69 patients) compared to 8 percent of those who also had goserelin treatment (5 of  66 patients). Of the 218 patients enrolled in the trial, 12 patients on the standard arm (11 percent) became pregnant vs 22 patients on the goserelin treatment arm (21 percent).

“This trial was the first demonstration of improved fertility prospects and more successful pregnancies when goserelin was used,” said Halle Moore, M.D., Cleveland Clinical Foundation and the lead investigator for POEMS. “Premenopausal women beginning chemotherapy for early breast cancer should consider this new option to prevent premature ovarian failure.”

The trial was conducted by SWOG, one of NCI’s five National Clinical Trial Network groups, with the collaboration of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, and international access provided through the International Breast Cancer Study Group which includes the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Group.

The standard approach to preserving fertility in young female cancer patients is to harvest and store ovarian tissue, ovarian follicles, or embryos prior to cancer treatment. “Finding a simple and accessible way to protect fertility in young breast cancer patients while not harming cancer outcomes is an important issue,” said Lori Minasian, M.D., deputy director of the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention and one of the researchers on POEMS.

Fertility-preserving treatment was not expected to have an effect on cancer outcomes and this data was analyzed only to ensure there were no detrimental effects from that treatment.

In the United States alone almost 49,000 women under age 50 are diagnosed with invasive breast cancer each year; nearly 11,000 of those are under age 40. Of this population, about 15 percent have breast cancer that is hormone-receptor negative, meaning the disease does not feed on hormones or respond to therapy against hormones.

###

Reference:  Moore HCF, et al. Prevention of Early Menopause Study (POEMS)/S0230, a Phase III Trial of LHRH Agonist Administration During Chemotherapy to Reduce Ovarian Failure in Early Stage, Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer: An International Intergroup Trial of SWOG, IBCSG, ECOG, and CALGB (Alliance). ASCO abstract LBA505. ClinicalTrials.gov

URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00068601.

POEMS was coordinated by SWOG, an NCI-supported cancer research cooperative group that designs and conducts multidisciplinary clinical trials to improve the practice of medicine in preventing, detecting, and treating cancer, and to enhance the quality of life for cancer survivors. An international study, POEMS was available worldwide through the International Breast Cancer Study Group, and supported by grants from the U.S. National Cancer Institute and in part by the Australia and New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group, the Breast Cancer Institute of Australia, and AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at http://www.cancer.gov or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).

NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

If You Are a Cancer Survivor, This Is a Must Read .


 

Watch for these 9 warning signs.

Getting through cancer treatment successfully is something to celebrate. To stay in good health, doctors say you need to watch for other symptoms, including vision changes, headaches and problems with balance.

What many cancer survivors don’t realize is that 25 percent of people who survive some common cancers go on to develop a brain tumor. These brain tumors don’t originate in the brain but are actually cancerous cells from the original tumor that travel to the brain through the bloodstream. When this happens, doctors call these tumors brain metastases.

xray film of brain

“About one-third of patients with the most common cancers — lung, breast and kidney cancer and melanoma — are at risk of developing brain metastases,” says Cleveland Clinic neurosurgeon Gene Barnett, MD.

When this happens, the resulting growth needs early treatment. Dr. Barnett says early detection can help people get the right treatment at the right time to avoid serious complications. This is why you need to be vigilant and pay attention to your symptoms.

Watch for these 9 signs

If you’ve had cancer and experience these symptoms, be sure to tell your doctor:

  1. Vision changes (such as double vision or partial vision loss)
  2. Headaches (possibly with nausea)
  3. Numbness or tingling in part of the body
  4. Paralysis or difficulty moving any part of the body
  5. Inability to walk
  6. Difficulty with balance and an increased incidence of falls
  7. Difficulty speaking (including slurred words or incoherent speech)
  8. Problems with mental acuity (such as not being able to read or tell time)
  9. Seizure or convulsions

Metastatic brain tumors tend to develop gradually, although severe episodes can occur. No matter what, it’s important to tell your doctor immediately so he or she can evaluate you and treat you early as needed.

Treatable brain tumors

For years, doctors believed that brain metastases were uniformly fatal. Treatment could only to relieve symptoms. Today, they know that such tumors are treatable, thanks to technological and medical advances. The key is early detection.

To help in this fight, Cleveland Clinic teamed with the Northern Ohio American Cancer Society to establish the B-Aware Program. “Our goal is to educate at-risk cancer patients so that brain metastases are detected as early as possible, when they have the greatest number of treatment options,” says Dr. Barnett.

Many treatments available

We’ve come a long way from the days when the only treatment option available for brain metastases was whole brain radiation. This often failed to control the tumors. Today, aggressive and precisely delivered treatments produce better outcomes with fewer side effects.

Treatment options depend on the location, type and extent of the tumor, and include:

  • Radiosurgery. Radiosurgery directs highly focused beams of radiation at the tumor with extreme precision. This will not destroy the tumor, but may succeed in stopping tumor growth. Surgeons deliver this radiation so precisely that they can spare the surrounding brain tissue. Gamma Knife surgery is a common form of radiosurgery.
  • Minimal access surgery. This type of surgery allows doctors to remove the tumor in a faster, simpler way. Surgeons make a very small incision in the skull or hidden in a nearby structure. This reduces postoperative complications, minimizes pain and scarring, and shortens recovery time.
  • Localized radiotherapy, or radiation therapy. Radiotherapy exposes the cancerous cells to ionizing radiation that injures or destroys them. Doctors often use radiotherapy before or in addition to radiosurgery.
  • Medical therapies. Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill tumor cells that are dividing most rapidly. Many drugs used successfully for tumors in the body cannot penetrate into the brain. However, in certain cases, chemotherapy or other medical treatments may secure control of certain brain metastases.

“We want to help patients ‘be aware’ of all management options, so they don’t blindly agree to a proposed treatment which may not be in their best interest,” says Dr. Barnett. “They always have the right to seek a second opinion.”

Tags: b-aware, brain metastases, brain metastasis, breast cancer, cancer, Headaches, kidney cancer, lung cancer, lung cancer awareness month 2012, melanoma, paralysis, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, seizures