Six Rules Doctors Have To Know.


Rule 1: They don’t want to be at your office.

It may seem odd to patients, but most doctors forget that going to the doctor is generally unnerving. We work there, and being in a doctor’s office is normal to us. Not so with most patients. The spotlight is on them and their health. They stand on the scale, undress, tell intimate things about their lives, confess errors, are poked, prodded, shot with needles, lectured at, and then billed for the whole thing….There is always an underlying fear and self-consciousness that pervades when a person is sitting on the exam table. The best thing to do in response to that is to show compassion.

Rule 2: They have a reason to be at your office.

They don’t come to the office to waste the doctor’s time. Yet early in my training I was incredulous at the reasons some of my patients were coming to see the doctor. Why come in for a headache? Why come in for a cold?…It took me being in my own practice (and trying to keep my business going) to realize that there is (almost) always an underlying reason for a patient to come in. Sometimes that reason is simple: they have terrible pain that needs to be treated. Other times, however, the reason is more subtle. When a person comes to my office with enlarged lymph nodes, for example, the real reason they are coming in is that they are afraid it is cancer. If a person has chest pains, they are afraid it is their heart. On every visit I try to identify the real reason (or the real fear) that brings them to see me. I don’t end the visit until I have addressed that reason.

Rule 3: They feel what they feel.

Patients will often tell me their symptoms in a very apologetic tone. They seem to think that they have to come to me with the “right” set of symptoms, and not having those symptoms is their fault. Sometimes those symptoms make no sense to me at all, and I am tempted to dismiss or ignore them. But as a physician, you have to trust your patient….Yes, some may exaggerate what they feel out of anxiety or out of fear that you won’t hear them for lesser symptoms, but then your job is to uncover the anxiety, not ignore the complaint. I have heard from many patients that their doctor “did not believe” their complaints because they did not make sense. If you don’t trust them, why should they trust you?

Rule 4: They don’t want to look stupid.

People are often worried that they are over-reacting. They wonder what I must think for a person to come to the office with that symptom. This is especially true of parents bringing their children in. Nobody wants to be “that mother that over-reacts to everything.” In response to this, I try to specifically say, “I am glad you came to the office for this because…” or “Yeah, I can see how that worried you because it could be….”

Rule 5: They pay for a plan.

What do people pay for when they come to the medical office? They pay for opinion, yes. They pay for knowledge as well. But what they really pay for is a plan of action….They want to know what is going to be done to help. I try and give a plan, either verbal or written, to each patient that walks out of the exam room. What medications are given and why? What medications are to be stopped? What tests are ordered and what will the results mean? When is the next appointment? What should they call for if they have problems? The better I can answer these questions, the more confidently the patient will walk out of the exam room. The days of paternalistic medicine are over – no handing a prescription and just saying “take it.” Patients should know why they are putting things in their body.

Rule 6: The visit is about them.

With all of the stresses in a doctor’s office, I get tempted to complain about things. Who better to complain to than someone who feels much the same way? But patients are paying for you to take care of their problems, not the reverse. I keep my personal gripes or frustrations to myself as much as possible.

http://www.doctorshangout.com/m/blogpost?id=2002836%3ABlogPost%3A902726

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Hope still for Comet Ison


Hope still for Comet Ison: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/hope-still-for-comet-ison/article5405667.ece

Euthanasia: Hope you never need it, but be glad of choice.


Sent from the CNN App for Android

Euthanasia: Hope you never need it, but be glad of choice
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/27/opinion/opinion-pro-euthanasia-philip-nitschke/index.html

Eutanasia: can we live without it.


Sent from the CNN App for Android

Euthanasia: We can live without it…
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/27/opinion/opinion-anti-euthanasia-kevin-fitzpatrick/index.html

Cholesterol ‘fuels’ breast cancer.


Cholesterol ‘fuels’ breast cancer http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25142026

HIV response ‘at turning point’


HIV response ‘at turning point’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25118975

Hope still for ‘dead’ Comet Ison


Hope still for ‘dead’ Comet Ison http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25143861

Why you should decalcify your pineal gland and how?


Nestled deep inside the middle of your brain rests the pineal gland. Descartes believed it to be the seat of the soul and scientists have found that it produces melatonin, which affects sleep patterns. In the metaphysical community, it is believed that the pineal gland in most people today is not activated or stimulated, due to too much electronic stimulation and fluoride in tap water and toothpaste.

However, pineal gland activation is possible if you know how. But why should we care about pineal gland activation? What are the benefits of pineal gland activation?



There are seven Chakras in our bodies and the pineal gland is the 6th one. All of the chakras should be balanced for the optimal performance of the body and the mind. Pineal gland activation will help the 6th Chakra reach its potential, which includes clairvoyance, psychic abilities, imagination, and dreaming.
Pineal gland activation will awaken our minds ability for prophecy. A person who has achieved pineal gland activation will experience increased psychic awareness and psychic talents. Some people believe that supernatural powers will be initiated with pineal gland activation.

Besides increased psychic awareness, pineal gland activation will help the pineal gland, or the third eye, to act as a stargate that can see beyond space and time. It also acts as a link between the physical world and the spiritual world.
That’s not all. Other benefits of pineal gland activation include telepathy and a greater level of perceptiveness that can go beyond this three dimensional world. There are three crystals in the pineal gland which help with this ability of visionary capacity. The three crystals are apatitie, calcite, and magnetite. 

Apatitie helps with inspiration, spiritual oneness, and psychic enhancement, while calcite is for the expansion of powers. Magnetite aids with mediation, visionary purpose, and establishing our experiences in the physical world. Together, all these three crystals create a cosmic antennae, which aids the transfer of signals between the different dimensional planes.

All these benefits have caused some people to believe that the most famous prophets of our history all have undergone pineal gland activation.

If all these benefits sound like something you want to experience, the next step is to learn how to achieve pineal gland activation. The most important step in activating the pineal gland is to raise the frequency in the body. This can be done through meditation, visualization yoga, chanting, dancing, drum sounds, Tai Chi postures, Qigong positions, and using stereo grams. Any of these methods will open the third eye (the pineal gland) and help you to be able to see beyond the physical world. This process takes practice – with practice, you will be able to do this faster and more often.

Producing certain sounds can activate your pineal gland. One method is to make the sound’nnnn’ while covering your ears. Then sound ‘mmm’ for a few minutes, and then say ‘ngngng’ for the same amount of time. These sounds will put a light pressure on the pineal gland, which stimulates it and activates it.

Light is one of the stimulators for the pineal gland. You can do a mediation that includes a beam of light. One method is to close your eyes and focus all of your thoughts on the pineal gland (remember, it is in the middle of your brain). Send beams of light to the following locations, all in this order: your front side, the back of your head, to the left of you, to the right of you, straight up, and straight down. Breathe in deeply thought your nose, and then exhale through your mouth. Repeat all the steps several times before relaxing and opening your eyes. Source: Untold Truth for Humanity

How to decalcify your Pineal Gland

Stop ingesting fluoride: One of the substances that does a great job calcifying the pineal gland is fluoride (sodium fluoride). Fluoride is very harmful to the pineal gland because it disrupts the pineal gland’s natural functions by hardening its interior walls. Fluoride is also very toxic to the brain and other organs of the body.

The name fluoride is a cover up term for many of the dangerous chemicals that make up fluoride, including arsenic, lead, aluminum, cadmium, fluorosilicic acid and even radioactive materials. If you live in the U.S., fluoride is commonly found in drinking water, fluoridated toothpaste and conventional produce.

To effectively remove fluoride from drinking water, you will need to use a water purification system that has a special filter called activated alumina (AAL). The water purification system worth checking out is made by Berkey. Reverse osmosis water filter systems are also great at removing fluoride. As for toothpaste, only use fluoride-free toothpaste.

Take an iodine supplement: Studies have shown that iodine supplement may help the body remove fluoride. The iodine supplement I recommend is NutrioDine because it is made of atomic iodine, a form of iodine that the body can easily utilize without the harmful effects of toxic buildups. I do not recommend taking potassium iodide because it can cause toxic buildups, especially if it is taken for long periods of time. For food, I recommend eating organic kelp because it is high in natural iodine.

Eat organic food: Most foods that are not organic usually contain harmful synthetic chemicals and heavy metals. Many of these toxins are toxic to the pineal gland. To reduce the level of these toxins in your body, you will need to eat organic food. Organic foods are produce with strict guidelines; therefore, they are not suppose to contain harmful synthetic chemicals and genetically modified ingredients.

The levels of nutrients in organic foods are usually higher than conventional foods. Many of these nutrients are essential for purging toxins from your body. Magnesium and calcium are two important nutrients for helping your body eliminate toxins, especially fluoride.

Consume natural butter oil and cod liver oil: High-vitamin butter oil and cod liver oil are very beneficial for decalcification of the pineal gland, because it helps decalcify calcium deposits. One of the best natural butter oils and cod liver oils is Green Pasture’s Blue Ice Royal Butter and Cod Liver Oil.

Source: http://energyfanatics.com/

Are Alzheimer’s and diabetes the same disease?


HAVING type 2 diabetes may mean you are already on the path to Alzheimer’s. This startling claim comes from a study linking the two diseases more intimately than ever before. There is some good news: the same research also offers a way to reverse memory problems associated with diabetes – albeit in rats – which may hint at a new treatment for Alzheimer’s.

“Perhaps you should use Alzheimer’s drugs at the diabetes stage to prevent cognitive impairment in the first place,” says Ewan McNay from the University at Albany in New York.

Alzheimer’s cost the US $130 billion in 2011 alone. One of the biggest risk factors is having type 2 diabetes. This kind of diabetes occurs when liver, muscle and fat cells stop responding efficiently to insulin, the hormone that tells them to absorb glucose from the blood. The illness is usually triggered by eating too many sugary and high-fat foods that cause insulin to spike, desensitising cells to its presence. As well as causing obesity, insulin resistance can also lead to cognitive problems such as memory loss and confusion.

Are brain changes associated with Alzheimer's (green) reversible? <i>(Image: Medical Body Scans/Jessica Wilson/Photo Researchers/SPL)</i>

In 2005, a study by Susanne de la Monte’s group at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, identified a reason why people with type 2 diabetes had a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s. In this kind of dementia, the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in learning and memory, seemed to be insensitive to insulin. Not only could your liver, muscle and fat cells be “diabetic” but so it seemed, could your brain.

Feeding animals a diet designed to give them type 2 diabetes leaves their brains riddled with insoluble plaques of a protein called beta-amyloid – one of the calling cards of Alzheimer’s. We also know that insulin plays a key role in memory. Taken together, the findings suggest that Alzheimer’s might be caused by a type of brain diabetes.

If that is the case, the memory problems that often accompany type 2 diabetes may in fact be early-stage Alzheimer’s rather than mere cognitive decline.

Although there is no definitive consensus on the exact causes of Alzheimer’s, we do know that brains get clogged with beta-amyloid plaques. One idea gaining ground is that it is not the plaques themselves that cause the symptoms, but their precursors – small, soluble clumps of beta-amyloid called oligomersMovie Camera. The insoluble plaques could actually be the brain’s way of trying to isolate the toxic oligomers.

To investigate whether beta-amyloid might also be a cause of cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes, McNay, Danielle Osborne and their colleagues fed 20 rats a high-fat diet to give them type 2 diabetes. These rats, and another 20 on a healthy diet, were then trained to associate a dark cage with an electric shock. Whenever the rats were returned to this dark cage, they froze in fear – measuring how long they stayed still is a standard way of inferring how good their memory is.

Memory boost

As expected, the diabetic rats had weaker memories than the healthy ones – they froze in the dark for less than half the time of their healthy counterparts. To figure out whether this was due to the beta-amyloid plaques or the soluble precursors, Pete Tessier at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, engineered fragments of antibodies that disrupt the action of one or the other.

When the plaque-disrupting antibodies were injected into diabetic rats, no change was seen. However, after receiving antibodies specific for oligomers, they froze for just as long as the healthy rats. “The cognitive deficit brought on by their diabetes is entirely reversed,” says McNay.

Until now, the standard explanation for the cognitive decline associated with type 2 diabetes is that it is a result of insulin signalling gone awry. One effect is to reduce the hippocampus’s ability to transport energy, or glucose, to neurons during a cognitive task. The fact that amyloid builds up in the brains of diabetic animals – and also in people, was seen as an unhappy consequence of insulin imbalance.

These experiments suggest oligomers are actually to blame. Previous work from other groups has shown that the same enzymes break down both insulin and beta-amyloid oligomers – and that the oligomers prevent insulin binding to its receptors in the hippocampus. So when there is too much insulin around – as there is in someone with type 2 diabetes – those enzymes are working flat out to break it down. This preferential treatment of insulin leaves the oligomers to form clumps, which then keep insulin from its receptors, causing a vicious spiral of impaired brain insulin signalling coupled with cognitive decline.

“We think that our treatment soaked up the amyloid oligomers, so that they could no longer block insulin from binding to its receptors,” says McNay, who presented the preliminary data at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego earlier this month. “Everyone thinks of amyloid build-up as a consequence of the events that cause cognitive impairment in diabetes, but we’re saying it’s actually a cause.” It means, he says, that the cognitive decline seen in type 2 diabetes may be thought of as early-stage Alzheimer’s.

It’s a bold claim, and if correct, one with big implications. Given that the number of people with type 2 diabetes is expected to jump from 382 million now to 592 million by 2035, we might expect to see a similar trajectory for associated Alzheimer’s (New Scientist, 1 September 2012). If beta-amyloid build-up can be stopped in people with type 2 diabetes and their cognitive impairment reversed – perhaps many of them will never progress to Alzheimer’s.

For the last few years, organisations like the UK’s Alzheimer’s Society have been backing clinical trials to look for diabetes drugs that may have an effect on Alzheimer’s patients. “We’re saying that this may be not the only way to think about it,” says McNay.

The next step is to repeat the work, and if the results are corroborated, start looking for a drug that would do the same thing as the group’s modified antibodies, without having to inject the drug directly into the hippocampus. It will also be necessary to work out just how much amyloid the brain can safely do without, since low levels are important for memory formation.

“The work opens the door to inoculating the most at risk group, people with type 2 diabetes,” says Tres Thompson of the University of Texas at Dallas. There have been plenty of failed attempts to use antibodies to relieve Alzheimer’s in the past. “But these were all in people with advanced stages of the disease. Vaccinating people much earlier could give better results.”

Some researchers are still wary of focusing on beta-amyloid when 20 years of working on a treatment for that particular aspect of the disease has come to nothing. “I think it’s brilliant work – he’s using new techniques that seem to be working, but it’s still very beta-centric,” says Olivier Thibault at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. He cautiously agrees that McNay’s data do seem to suggest a causative link between beta-amyloid and impaired insulin signalling but says the group needs to factor in the effect of ageing – both diabetes and Alzheimer’s become more likely as we grow older.

Jessica Smith, spokeswoman for the UK Alzheimer’s Society in London welcomes the work. “We need to tease out the difference between those with type 2 diabetes who develop Alzheimer’s and those who don’t. If people were developing the signs earlier than we thought, then perhaps we can intervene earlier, rather than waiting until they have full clinical Alzheimer’s.”

Of course, there is another solution to staving off type 2 diabetes and any consequential Alzheimer’s that requires no drugs at all. “Go to the gym and eat fewer twinkies,” says McNay.