Focused PSA Screening Strategy, Based on Empirical Data.


Three lifetime prostate-specific antigen tests (age: mid 40s, early 50s, and 60) are sufficient for at least half of men.

 

Swedish investigators have reported that 60-year-old men with blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels 1 µg/L have 0.2% risk for prostate cancer within 25 years (JW Gen Med Oct 7 2010). In this study, the same investigators determined the associations between PSA levels at various ages and subsequent risk for metastatic prostate cancer and prostate cancer–related death.

From 1974 to 1984, 21,000 men (age, 52) provided baseline blood samples; 4900 provided additional samples 6 years later. During a median follow-up of 27 years, prostate cancer was diagnosed in 1369 men: Metastatic disease occurred in 241 men, and 163 prostate cancer–related deaths were recorded. Outcomes were as follows:

  • 15-year risk for metastatic prostate cancer was 0.6% for men in the highest PSA decile at age 40 (1.3 µg/L), 1.6% for men in the highest PSA deciles at ages 45 to 49 (1.6 µg/L), and 5.2% for men in the highest deciles at ages 51 to 55 (2.4 µg/L)
  • For men with PSA levels below the median at ages 45 to 49 (0.68 µg/L) and 51 to 55 (0.85 µg/L), 15-year risks for metastatic prostate cancer were only 0.1% and 0.3%, respectively
  • 44% of prostate cancer–related deaths within 30 years occurred in men in the highest PSA deciles at ages 45 to 49 (1.6 µg/L) and 51 to 55 (2.4 µg/L)

Comment: Based on these results, the authors recommend that screening not begin until age 45 and that men with PSA levels 1.0 µg/L undergo one repeat screening in their 50s and one at age 60 (those with PSA levels 1.0 µg/L at age 60 should not undergo further screening). They also suggest that men with PSA levels >1.0 µg/L at any age undergo more frequent screening and that men in the highest PSA deciles at ages 45 to 55 receive “particular focus,” because they contribute close to half of all deaths from prostate cancer before age 75. Although this strategy could be more efficient than the annual screening often conducted in the U.S., whether screening in this manner would prevent prostate cancer–related mortality is unclear.

 

Source:Journal Watch General Medicine

 

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